Articles
   
       
Pics/Video
       
Wake 101
   
       
       
Shop
Search
 
 
 
 
 
Home   Articles   Pics/Video   Gear   Wake 101   Events   Community   Forums   Classifieds   Contests   Shop   Search
WakeWorld Home
Email Password
Go Back   WakeWorld > Boats, Accessories & Tow Vehicles

Share 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old    Josh B (joshugan)      Join Date: Apr 2005       03-08-2017, 10:29 AM Reply   
Hi all, I have about $18,000-$20,000 to spend on a used truck. I'd like something that will be a decent daily driver but will also be able to haul a heavy boat (Super Air 230). I'm open to any variety of brands and both gasoline and diesel engines but reliability is a huge factor for me. Would also like to know what to steer clear of. Any thoughts you guys have would be much appreciated. Thanks!
Old    Shane (srich5)      Join Date: Apr 2016       03-08-2017, 11:50 AM Reply   
I just bought a 2016 Ford F150 ecoboost last fall. I bought it new and it was expensive but I cannot say enough about how powerful this thing is! It will tow your boat no problem. You should be able to find one of the earlier models in that price range I would guess.
Old    Nacho (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004       03-08-2017, 12:47 PM Reply   
Tundra
Old    C.I.E. J-Rod (jarrod)      Join Date: May 2003       03-08-2017, 1:18 PM Reply   
Diesel probably isn't an option unless you go with an old truck like an old F250/350 7.3. That's not going to be a good DD though.

I just sold my 2011 GMC Sierra 4X4 for 18K. It was a great truck. Only a 5.3 but the 6 speed auto made up a lot of towing power. I towed into the mountains with it many times and it did a good job. I ran it to 130K miles and it was still going strong.

I would be looking at any of the Ford, GMC/Chevy, and Dodge 1/2 ton V8 pickups. They're all going to do a good job. If you only need 2 wheel drive you can probably get one with low miles in your budget.
Old    BLAIR BARHAM (jonblarc7)      Join Date: Jul 2006       03-08-2017, 1:49 PM Reply   
You can find an 07-08 sierra denali like I have for that kinda of money. All denalis from 07 to 13 come with the 6.2 V8 with 405 hp It pulls great.

I would look at a tundra too, those come with a 4.30 rear end which would be great for towing.
Old    Rob Fullerton (Gotmods)      Join Date: Nov 2012       03-09-2017, 6:56 PM Reply   
20k 05 duramax 110k
Old    Nailem (nailem)      Join Date: Apr 2011       03-10-2017, 5:06 PM Reply   
I second the 05' duramax. I had one as my daily driver. Averaged around 16mpg mixed driving and 20 highway. I also got 20mpg towing my 23' Enzo. Couldn't tell it was back there.
I would not count out a 03' or 04' duramax or an 03' Cummings. They did not have as much emissions stuff and got better mileage.
Old    Rob Fullerton (Gotmods)      Join Date: Nov 2012       03-10-2017, 5:34 PM Reply   


Have a 03 3500 cummins 140k for 20k too.

25k can get a 07 mega cab loaded 140k
Old    Curtis Hunter (PotatoShack)      Join Date: Aug 2013       03-11-2017, 3:31 AM Reply   
I've got a 2013 RAM Hemi 4X4 I'll let go for $16000 double cab half ton
Old     (WheelerWake)      Join Date: Mar 2013       03-11-2017, 6:47 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshugan View Post
Hi all, I have about $18,000-$20,000 to spend on a used truck. I'd like something that will be a decent daily driver but will also be able to haul a heavy boat (Super Air 230). I'm open to any variety of brands and both gasoline and diesel engines but reliability is a huge factor for me. Would also like to know what to steer clear of. Any thoughts you guys have would be much appreciated. Thanks!
Buying used are the key words here. Gas trucks depreciate more than diesel, so use that to your advantage, buy a gas burner.
Old    Nacho (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004       03-11-2017, 8:38 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonblarc7 View Post
You can find an 07-08 sierra denali like I have for that kinda of money. All denalis from 07 to 13 come with the 6.2 V8 with 405 hp It pulls great.

I would look at a tundra too, those come with a 4.30 rear end which would be great for towing.
Tundras also come with a 6 speed trans behind a 380 horse motor. pulled a 28' rv with the last one I had.
Old    Todd (antoddio)      Join Date: Dec 2006       03-11-2017, 12:35 PM Reply   
Duh, Toyota. Buy it and you will have it for your kids to drive, even if you don't have any kids yet. 13 years, 155K and mines only needed two sets of brakes, 2 batteries, and a CV boot.Plus Toyota's are often more "made in america" than the American brands, if that matters to you.
Old    Marc H (ctxaggies)      Join Date: May 2010       03-11-2017, 7:28 PM Reply   
My 2011 tundra has been outstanding. 155k trouble free miles and plan to put atleast another 50k on it.
Old    Todd (antoddio)      Join Date: Dec 2006       03-11-2017, 10:55 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctxaggies View Post
My 2011 tundra has been outstanding. 155k trouble free miles and plan to put atleast another 50k on it.
another 50K or another 500K? No joke but both are highly probably. These are just incredible machines. It's fun to watch them cross 300, 400 or 500K plus with no rebuilds and original tranny. Try that with a domestic lol.
Old     (WheelerWake)      Join Date: Mar 2013       03-12-2017, 7:12 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by antoddio View Post
Try that with a domestic lol.
I have, lol.
Old    Marc H (ctxaggies)      Join Date: May 2010       03-12-2017, 9:35 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by antoddio View Post
another 50K or another 500K? No joke but both are highly probably. These are just incredible machines. It's fun to watch them cross 300, 400 or 500K plus with no rebuilds and original tranny. Try that with a domestic lol.


This
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       03-12-2017, 4:56 PM Reply   
'80-'97 F-350 with either 460 or diesel. My daily driver is an '86 crew cab F-350 4x4 with 6.9 turbo diesel and 5 speed manual. Great truck, it's a simple and reliable workhorse. If reliability is your #1 concern I'd be looking at '82-'87 460 trucks or '83-'94 diesel trucks. Reason being in '88 they went EFI on the 460 and after '94 the diesel was EFI. For reliability I will only have a carburetor or mechanical fuel injection on my daily driver, I need it to just plain work every time so EFI won't cut it.
Old    Matt Zelenik (mlzelenik)      Join Date: Apr 2016       03-13-2017, 9:55 AM Reply   
I DD my 05 6.0 powerstroke. I personally don't think you need a diesel to tow the 230 unless you spend a lot of time towing, or tow long distance, then a diesel is nice. I love driving something big so my F250 is a great DD for me but unless you are like me I'd stick to the 1/2 ton for best of the DD world
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       03-13-2017, 6:11 PM Reply   
Don't need a diesel to tow <6000 lbs, but keep in mind short wheelbase trucks can get scary towing anything with appreciable weight. 1/2 ton may be fine (though less forgiving) but at least have a regular cab long bed. Tail wagging the dog is a lot of pucker factor. A 300 six will tow a SAN 230 adequately, it will suck but it'll get the job done. For it to be pleasant you'll want a big block or a diesel and you'll appreciate 3/4 ton or bigger brakes on a long wheelbase truck.
Old    DC (durty_curt)      Join Date: Apr 2008       03-13-2017, 7:18 PM Reply   
Hey Josh, congrats on the bigger boat! OK so since we both live in same area, how far do you intend to tow (which lakes etc) also as dd what is your round trip commute? Both of these things would help determine which route to go. But I'm leaning towards petrol, and that's coming from a diesel dude.
Old    Todd (antoddio)      Join Date: Dec 2006       03-14-2017, 6:29 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadunkle View Post
'80-'97 F-350 with either 460 or diesel. My daily driver is an '86 crew cab F-350 4x4 with 6.9 turbo diesel and 5 speed manual. Great truck, it's a simple and reliable workhorse. If reliability is your #1 concern I'd be looking at '82-'87 460 trucks or '83-'94 diesel trucks. Reason being in '88 they went EFI on the 460 and after '94 the diesel was EFI. For reliability I will only have a carburetor or mechanical fuel injection on my daily driver, I need it to just plain work every time so EFI won't cut it.
So for the sake of reliability, buy a 35 year old truck??
Old    Rick (CALIV210)      Join Date: Jun 2015       03-14-2017, 8:07 AM Reply   
I vote Tundra or used Cummins or Duramax . Never liked Ford but you know what they say about opinions hahaha

I really hate this conversation all the 1/2 ton guys will say us 3/4 ton guys are compensating lol Then all of us 3/4 ton diesel guys swear we would never go back to a half ton gas truck . Ive had lots of trucks and as far as feeling safe and capable goes I'll stuck with my Dmax . I think those Ecoboosts are pretty cool but I'd never own one .

Last edited by CALIV210; 03-14-2017 at 8:11 AM. Reason: add
Old    C.I.E. J-Rod (jarrod)      Join Date: May 2003       03-14-2017, 9:41 AM Reply   
Diesel is a luxury unless you're towing bigger things than a boat. I love my Cummins but in this case I think a newer truck with gas is smarter than an old Diesel.
Old    Rick (CALIV210)      Join Date: Jun 2015       03-14-2017, 10:02 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarrod View Post
Diesel is a luxury unless you're towing bigger things than a boat. I love my Cummins but in this case I think a newer truck with gas is smarter than an old Diesel.
Some times the better fuel mileage will pay for the luxury of a diesel . But I agree for lots of people a gas powered truck fits the bill better.
Old     (WheelerWake)      Join Date: Mar 2013       03-14-2017, 7:07 PM Reply   
Diesel cost about 20% more in this area, which must be considered when using fuel mileage as a justification.
Old    Rob Fullerton (Gotmods)      Join Date: Nov 2012       03-14-2017, 9:40 PM Reply   
Really a 20k ram 1500 sounds perfect. Lol.
Old    C.I.E. J-Rod (jarrod)      Join Date: May 2003       03-15-2017, 7:11 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by CALIV210 View Post
Some times the better fuel mileage will pay for the luxury of a diesel . But I agree for lots of people a gas powered truck fits the bill better.
I did the math multiple times to try and justify it. It never worked out but I did it anyway. Maybe if you can pay cash for the truck and avoid interest there's a chance of that working out. I just bought my 2011 Laramie Megacab, and the truck was almost double what you would pay for a loaded gas 1500 of the same year. Granted its a lot more truck, but still is a big chunk of money. I tuned my cummins and did exhaust. I'm getting about 4 more miles per gallon than my gas 1500 did. But Diesel is also the same cost of mid grade here so it's a wash.
Old    BLAIR BARHAM (jonblarc7)      Join Date: Jul 2006       03-15-2017, 8:49 AM Reply   
I had a 2008 duramax with everything upgraded but turbo and injectors as my last truck and a 2008 6.2 denali 1500 as my current truck. I loved the duramax BUT there is something for the peace of mind that if something does break in a modified truck it won't cost 4,000 to 7000 dollars. I'm upgrading the fueling in my 1500 now for up coming LSA supercharger swap or PRO charger. Used injectors and a fuel pump are only 600 buck. Injectors on a duramax are what 2000$.

All that said after pulling a 24 foot boat with lead. With both truck a 6.2 gas engine pull almost as good as the duramax. Now up the side of a mountain of course the duramax was better but for a wake boat once a week a 1500 with a bigger engine or gears will be fine.

I pulled this boat with an 03 5.3 Silverado for almost 2 years and it did fine but I wouldn't want to do it any more.
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       03-15-2017, 10:55 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by antoddio View Post
So for the sake of reliability, buy a 35 year old truck??
Correct, OP stated reliability was a huge concern hence my recommendation for a simple and reliable truck that won't leave him stranded.
Old    Rob Fullerton (Gotmods)      Join Date: Nov 2012       03-15-2017, 11:11 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadunkle View Post
Correct, OP stated reliability was a huge concern hence my recommendation for a simple and reliable truck that won't leave him stranded.
Love your style Cadunkle. I called my old DD the tractor because year after year it just chugged along. Something to be said about mechanical simplicity.
Old    Todd (antoddio)      Join Date: Dec 2006       03-15-2017, 6:36 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotmods View Post
Love your style Cadunkle. I called my old DD the tractor because year after year it just chugged along. Something to be said about mechanical simplicity.
I agree with that, but 35 years later power steering, suspension arms, AC, wheel bearings, the frame, wiring, gauges, fuel pumps, heater cores, radiators, shocks, etc etc. have a tendency to wear out even if your engine starts. And I was the only one in my family that could reliably start a carburetor engine- drop the pedal to the floor and slowly let it up twice. However I was always crossing my fingers hoping it would start. Most tricky when the engine was luke warm and you tried to start it. Pump the gas and you flood it, but don't pump and it will just crank and not catch. Similar thing with the stupid carbureted boat engines. In the last 25 years with EFI, it's always just been turn once and start!
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       03-16-2017, 7:43 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by antoddio View Post
I agree with that, but 35 years later power steering, suspension arms, AC, wheel bearings, the frame, wiring, gauges, fuel pumps, heater cores, radiators, shocks, etc etc. have a tendency to wear out even if your engine starts.
Power steering: Some of the most reliable components on 30-50 year old vehicles in my experience. There's little to go wrong, and the most common failure is the high pressure hose ($10 and a few minutes to replace) or the sector shaft seal, $5 and maybe 15-20 minutes. Good preventative maintenance to do every 30-50 years, but these things don't fail often and won't leave you stranded.

Suspension arms: The vehicles I suggested don't have control arms, regardless control arms and other suspension arms are not wear items unless you park and drive in a salt mine and don't maintain your vehicle.

AC: I've never owned a vehicle that had air conditioning so I can't speak to the reliability or maintenance of such systems but a failed air conditioner will not leave you stranded.

Wheel bearings: Are regular maintenance items. Front bearings on Dana 44 and Dana 60 axles should be inspected, repacked and adjusted at least every 30k miles or whenever you have water above the axle. I've never had a wheel bearing failure and even on trucks I've seen that had wheel bearings badly neglected I've never seen a failure that left anyone stranded.

Frame: Is not a wear item unless you park and drive in a salt mine and don't maintain your vehicle.

Wiring: Main under hood wiring should be inspected periodically and any wiring with cracked insulation replaced. Grounds should be inspected and cleaned as part of regular maintenance. Replacing some wiring every few decades, namely battery cables, is a normal maintenance item. Wiring wiring issues are typically caused by previous owners hack jobs, but are quick and easy to fix on a 35+ year old vehicle and won't leave you stranded.

Gauges: In all my years of driving 30+ year old vehicles I can't think of any chronic gauge problems. Occasionally a sender fails, they're cheap and only take a couple minutes to replace. Failure will not leave you stranded.

Fuel pumps: Are wear items that may fail every few decades. In my experience failures are very rare. $15 and 10 minutes to replace, if you're worried about being stranded keep a spare in the truck or proactively replace every dozen years or so.

Heater cores: Chronic failure is a result of replacing with cheap aluminum replacement made in China. Buy OE brass/copper heater cores for replacement and you don't have chronic failure. Aside from that not using proper coolant or maintaining the coolant system will cause premature failures. Regardless, on the trucks I suggested heater core replacement is a 5-20 minutes job depending if it has factory air conditioning or not.

Radiators: See heater cores

Shocks: Are wear items. They typically last 30k-50k miles depending on quality and use. Failure will not leave you stranded.


I'm not really following what you're getting at... Some parts eventually wear out with use and must be repaired or replaced, and with enough neglect and abuse things can fail prematurely? Check your owners manual, there's a maintenance schedule specifying service intervals for various major components. Take care of your vehicle and it will take care of you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by antoddio View Post
And I was the only one in my family that could reliably start a carburetor engine- drop the pedal to the floor and slowly let it up twice. However I was always crossing my fingers hoping it would start. Most tricky when the engine was luke warm and you tried to start it. Pump the gas and you flood it, but don't pump and it will just crank and not catch. Similar thing with the stupid carbureted boat engines. In the last 25 years with EFI, it's always just been turn once and start!
Sounds like some combination of vehicles not well maintained and the operators declining to learn how to operate a vehicle.
Old    Todd (antoddio)      Join Date: Dec 2006       03-16-2017, 8:23 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadunkle View Post
Power steering: Some of the most reliable components on 30-50 year old vehicles in my experience. There's little to go wrong, and the most common failure is the high pressure hose ($10 and a few minutes to replace) or the sector shaft seal, $5 and maybe 15-20 minutes. Good preventative maintenance to do every 30-50 years, but these things don't fail often and won't leave you stranded.

Suspension arms: The vehicles I suggested don't have control arms, regardless control arms and other suspension arms are not wear items unless you park and drive in a salt mine and don't maintain your vehicle.
-well when I lived in the salt mines in Ohio and WI, I spent a lot of money replacing control arms, tie rods, pitman arm parts, etc. Most are non-maintenance parts in my experience.

AC: I've never owned a vehicle that had air conditioning so I can't speak to the reliability or maintenance of such systems but a failed air conditioner will not leave you stranded.

Wheel bearings: Are regular maintenance items. Front bearings on Dana 44 and Dana 60 axles should be inspected, repacked and adjusted at least every 30k miles or whenever you have water above the axle. I've never had a wheel bearing failure and even on trucks I've seen that had wheel bearings badly neglected I've never seen a failure that left anyone stranded.
Maintenance items?? 30k?? That's ridiculous. Another reason to drive a Toyota, those go hundreds of thousands of miles and you don't even have to look at them.


Frame: Is not a wear item unless you park and drive in a salt mine and don't maintain your vehicle.
Again, living in the OH and WI salt mines after a decade in my experience ford and GM products started to show a lot of rust and often parts started falling off. In 35 years I doubt there would be anything left! Not sure how you get around this one. Washing the car every day won't help, the salt is everywhere.

Wiring: Main under hood wiring should be inspected periodically and any wiring with cracked insulation replaced. Grounds should be inspected and cleaned as part of regular maintenance. Replacing some wiring every few decades, namely battery cables, is a normal maintenance item. Wiring wiring issues are typically caused by previous owners hack jobs, but are quick and easy to fix on a 35+ year old vehicle and won't leave you stranded.
Quick and easy when you are a mechanic or an electrician

Gauges: In all my years of driving 30+ year old vehicles I can't think of any chronic gauge problems. Occasionally a sender fails, they're cheap and only take a couple minutes to replace. Failure will not leave you stranded.
Again, easy fix if you are a mechanic

Fuel pumps: Are wear items that may fail every few decades. In my experience failures are very rare. $15 and 10 minutes to replace, if you're worried about being stranded keep a spare in the truck or proactively replace every dozen years or so.

Heater cores: Chronic failure is a result of replacing with cheap aluminum replacement made in China. Buy OE brass/copper heater cores for replacement and you don't have chronic failure. Aside from that not using proper coolant or maintaining the coolant system will cause premature failures. Regardless, on the trucks I suggested heater core replacement is a 5-20 minutes job depending if it has factory air conditioning or not.
Good luck trying to get the local autozone dude to know the diff btw a brass/copper/aluminum core

Radiators: See heater cores

Shocks: Are wear items. They typically last 30k-50k miles depending on quality and use. Failure will not leave you stranded.
30-50k is crap! Money doesn't grow on trees! 155K and 13 years later the shocks on my Toyota are fine and perfectly operational even with a lot of towing, as they are most toyotas. They are not a wear item to them


I'm not really following what you're getting at... Some parts eventually wear out with use and must be repaired or replaced, and with enough neglect and abuse things can fail prematurely? Check your owners manual, there's a maintenance schedule specifying service intervals for various major components. Take care of your vehicle and it will take care of you.
Well, you can consider almost any part mentioned above maintenance. Maintenance can be as expensive and annoying as repairs. I'd rather have the vehicle that just doesn't break.


Sounds like some combination of vehicles not well maintained and the operators declining to learn how to operate a vehicle.

LOL the average person does not need to learn how to replace a heater core, sender unit, shaft sector seal, wheel bearing, etc. YES, if you want to buy a 35 year old truck and spend several weekends a year replacing stuff, getting dirty, and spending money, then if that's your definition of reliable, more power to you. However if he can spend 18-20K he can get something where its not going to need constant attention.

And yes, my parents generally had to work, so they could not get their ASE mechanic certification. And apparently our mechanics weren't very good either. Even by the book carb engines carb engines can be a pain, let alone you miss your 2 month tune up interval. lol

I hope you are taking this all in good fun!!
Old    Nacho (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004       03-16-2017, 8:48 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by antoddio View Post
I hope you are taking this all in good fun!!
good fun? I hope you're taking notes
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       03-16-2017, 6:15 PM Reply   
I see you're pushing buying a new Toyata every couple years, and hope nothing breaks in those few years that maintenance is neglected. You mentioned a 30k wheel bearing repack interval being ridiculous... That is the recommendation from Spicer, I've seen trucks go 100k+ before they start to get wobbly... Or you can maintain your vehicle every few years and have original bearings last decades, far longer than "sealed for life" (however short that life may be) unit bearings that cost an arm and a leg. With a solid axle you don't have control arms because there are none to rust out.. Furthermore, tie rods are big and meaty, they don't rust out, unlike tiny car sized components on a modern IFS truck that rust through or snap like twigs, and of course no numerous IFS bushings to dry out, crack, and result in a truck that wanders all over the road. No worries about ball joints either, king pins last decades and hundreds of thousands of miles... But, if you want to go a few hundred thousand miles without any parts replacement, you need to maintain the axle. That means repack bearings every few years, grease the tie rod ends and king pins every oil change. If that's too much you can just buy a $20k Toyota every few years though.

I've never had issues with frames rusting out on the trucks I recommended. They are C channel frames, open on the inside so easy to hose the salt off now and again through the winter.

Shocks lasting 150k miles? Keep dreaming. Sure they're still bolted on but they do not work like they did when they were new. My go to brand is Bilstein, very high quality, and they simply don't last that long before losing significant and appreciable effectiveness. You likely don't notice it because they wear out gradually.

Nothing difficult about getting an OE quality heater core, you just walk into any Ford dealership and order one or look it up online and order that way. Real easy in this day and age. Some parts are worth getting OE, others the aftermarket companies make fine replacements.

Regarding being a mechanic, electrician, or ASE certified to do basic maintenance and repairs... Well that's simply not necessary. We're not talking about rebuilding transmissions or diagnosing complex computer controlled electrical and emissions systems, just basic maintenance. I'm a desk jockey and I'm perfectly capable of maintaining my vehicles. In this day and age with the internet at your fingertips there's no excuse to not learn.

I work hard for my money, too hard to spend a fortune on a brand new vehicle that's going to nickel and dime me to death with one expensive repair after the next and suck up all my time due to maintenance or downtime. For me, an under $10k truck that will serve me well for the rest of my life hands down beats a $50k comparable new truck that I couldn't even order how I would want it. TCO of a simple reliable truck is a fraction of a comparable new truck. I'd rather save my money to retire earlier and spend more time on the water doing what I enjoy both before and after retirement.

And yes, it's all in good spirit. Different strokes for different folks.
Old    Todd (antoddio)      Join Date: Dec 2006       03-17-2017, 7:30 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadunkle View Post
I see you're pushing buying a new Toyata every couple years, and hope nothing breaks in those few years that maintenance is neglected. .
Nahh. I actually maintain my vehicle and can do just about anything to it. But there's just not a whole lot to maintain. Clean it and fluid changes. I do drain the axles every 75K and change the tranny fluid every 75K as well. However even with Toyota's where those fluids are not touched ever, I've seen very few failures even after 200-300k of operation. Not my style not to maintain though. I do oil every 10K, even though the oil analysis I did said I could keep running it. Brakes seem to happen every 75K cause one pad ends up getting stuck and wearing out.

If I sold it right now, I'm around $90 a month all in over the 10 years I've owned this vehicle including all maintenance and repairs (other than taillights and mirrors that have been knocked off). Not including gas of course. Best of all I've swapped the headlights, taillights, radio, and wheels to versions from the newer toyotas and people only think the car is a few years old, when it is 13. I'll have this thing for my kids to drive and I'm not even married yet. lol. Once thing I hate about older cars is rattles and loose steering, even if everything checks out. I could put someone behind the wheel of this thing and they would think it's new. So yea, as you say, I will do mostly only the required maintenance, which is next to none, enjoy hassle free operation, and will buy my new Toyota every few years (few years being 20). Just saying, they are awesome vehicles. So are the old trucks as you say, just depends where you want to invest you time I suppose.

Typically, as it works out, I get a girlfriend that owns a BMW, so I get all my fun fixing that, however new it is. Plus then I get to pay for everything else because they spent all their money on the car. Sigh.

If I wanted to waste money I would buy a Cayman or 911. I will fully admit that is a waste of money though and it would only be when I am in a position to buy it with cash and have paid off everything else.

Reply
Share 

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 6:57 PM.

Home   Articles   Pics/Video   Gear   Wake 101   Events   Community   Forums   Classifieds   Contests   Shop   Search
Wake World Home

 

© 2016 eWake, Inc.    
Advertise    |    Contact    |    Terms of Use    |    Privacy Policy    |    Report Abuse    |    Conduct    |    About Us