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Old    Surf Addict (Desi) (phathom)      Join Date: Jun 2013       07-21-2014, 3:46 PM Reply   
I've wakesurfed all of last season and this season and being about a hour or so away from the coast, I want to give ocean surfing a try. My buddy with no board experience except a little skateboarding here and there went last week and told me where he went. Well I've been out from behind the boat for a few weeks now and it's getting to me. This is something I've always wanted to try and got the wife on board to make a whole family beach trip day with my main reason to go surf.
We are headed out to Cannon Beach next week and I want to get some input from you guys who have done both.

What can I expect, what are major differences. I know boards are bigger, you are using a leash not a PFD, paddling out and having to do a pop up start. Any tips for me?
Old    Nick Wiersema (Chaos)      Join Date: Apr 2010       07-21-2014, 6:25 PM Reply   
Surfing is hunting. You have to hunt your wave, paddle around, position, and once you have made your selection and have a shot, then you have to turn around and paddle, and paddle, and pop up. It is all about timing. The actually riding is similar, not exactly the same but similar, especially in smaller surf. Larger surf is quite a lot different.
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       07-21-2014, 6:35 PM Reply   
Go for it. But... You're going to find ocean surfing a LOT harder for all the reasons Nick mentions & more. The timing of identifying a wave, positioning, paddling into it and getting up take a LOT of trial & error practice. It's not a once or twice out & getting it down kind of thing. I'd recommend starting with a longer/long board. That way, you can catch waves even in the white wash and get the hang of it.
Old    Dennis (denystaucd)      Join Date: Feb 2003       07-21-2014, 7:31 PM Reply   
What Nick and Andy said! Longer boards help with the learning curve. If the surf is up and big waves are rolling in, stay on shore. Trust me! The first time you get sucked under and pop out 30 seconds later you'll really respect those CRAZY big wave surfers. If the surf is low to medium its pretty chill and a lot of fun, but part of the fun is the paddling workout and waiting. Thus when you get a good wave it'll make your day. Behind the boat you can more easily recreate good condition, the ocean just doesn't cooperate. It'll also llok great from shore and you paddle out and can find a curl anywhere.
Cheers,
DC
Old    E Double U (three6ty)      Join Date: Feb 2004       07-21-2014, 7:51 PM Reply   
The hardest part of Surfing that you will experience is the popping up and balancing properly. In wakesurfing your already standing and riding on a flat surface where as real surfing your are attempting to stand up on a board that is both moving forward and angled down in most cases. Once you get your pop up and balance right you should be good to go. I suggest you practice and surf for a while on a longboard as the learning curve will be much faster and your experience will be much more enjoyable. Plus you will catch alot more waves!!!
Have fun!!!
Old    Justin Harrelson (skiboarder)      Join Date: Oct 2006       07-22-2014, 7:46 AM Reply   
If you like to swim, you will love surfing. If you don't, you are going to hate it. I have never seen an exception to that rule.
Old    Trayson Harmon (trayson)      Join Date: May 2013       07-22-2014, 10:44 AM Reply   
I was just talking about this with my brother in law on Saturday. he grew up ocean surfing every day in SoCal and he watched me wakesurf on Saturday. Yes, there are transferable skills but ocean surfing doesn't have the consistency. the waves vary a lot in size, shape, strength, and speed.

The place to go in Oregon is "short sands". it's Oswald West state park. it's a few miles south of Cannon Beach off Hwy 101. You park in a parking lot that straddles the HWY and you hike down a trail to a rocky beach.

Take a look at this link: http://goo.gl/maps/xnsNi the parking lot is on the right and you can see Short Sand Creek that goes down to the beach area on the left.

I have been body boarding there a few times. The water is COLD on the Oregon Coast. I wore my full suit and my hands and feet went numb. Sure you're better with cold than me, but still. You also get crazy tired swimming and you end up eating a lot of sand and salt water.

Don't get me wrong, it's fantastic when you actually catch a wave and ride it in (for a whopping 15 seconds). Wakesurfing is ridiculously easy in comparison.

If you want, before you spend the time renting a surfboard and all that, you could try it with a Boogy board. I have a pair of Moorey Boogie bodyboards that are in a nice backpack case that I would be happy to let you borrow any time you want. They haven't been used for years!!! they have the wrist leash. Yes, it's not a surf board, but it's also a lot easier to do and the learning curve is even quicker.

Just let me know and I can bring them to work with me and I'll let you use the boards for as long as you'd like.

If you do rent, there's a great surf shop in Cannon Beach called Cleanline Surf. You'll also want to stop in there just to shoot the sh**.

http://www.cleanlinesurf.com/theshop/surf-rentals/

Honestly, it might be worth starting with the Body board since I'll let you use mine for free and you can get a taste of the ocean thing before you commit to it more...
Old    Ben Holloway (BenHolloway)      Join Date: Aug 2012       07-22-2014, 10:50 AM Reply   
Oregon Coast, bring your cold gear... I was out last July in a 4/3 full with 3 mil. booties and pretty much no gloves. I was riding a super jet so I was working a little harder than you will be... and after about 20 mins. my feet were toast...
Old    Trayson Harmon (trayson)      Join Date: May 2013       07-22-2014, 11:03 AM Reply   
^^^^ right. last time I went it was a 3/2 farmer john with jacket and my feet went numb.
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       07-22-2014, 11:58 AM Reply   
^ We call that "club foot". (When your feet turn to wood.)
Old    Dave (bcrider)      Join Date: Apr 2006       07-22-2014, 12:04 PM Reply   
West coast temp doesn't change much year round it's more just the air temp that makes it better in the summer. What Dennis said. The last time I was down in West Port my friend and I walked out on the jetti to jump in past the break. Once in the water I realized how big the waves actually were. I got tossed out the front and dragged under. Came up and got dragged under again. Once up I had more waves coming in at me. I swallowed a lot of water that day. It sucked!!! Granted, I had only surfed a couple times before that so was still a rookie and only had wakeboarding and snowboarding as a background then. I would like to try it again now with being behind the boat but I just hate salt water. It stings my eyes and no matter what you are always going to get a bit of water in your mouth. Lastly, no matter how good of shape you are in your shoulders will be burning within 10 minutes of paddling if your not used to it.
Old    Mason Obray (MCObray)      Join Date: Mar 2013       07-22-2014, 12:05 PM Reply   
The wave you ride in the Ocean can kill you. The wave behind your boat can not.
Old    Surf Addict (Desi) (phathom)      Join Date: Jun 2013       07-22-2014, 1:45 PM Reply   
Thanks for all the replies. I was definitely going to bring my suit, maybe rent one if it's really cold put. Early August should be warmish.
I plan on renting a longboard, the timing seems like it's going to be the big factor.
As for fatigue, we'll see how that goes. I do enjoy swimming and hit the gym about 3 times a week for weight training and cardio, hopefully that helps.
Old    Ben Holloway (BenHolloway)      Join Date: Aug 2012       07-22-2014, 2:43 PM Reply   
What Mason said, prepare to suck at it, get your ass kicked and be cold if you aren't geared up. But the only way to learn it is love it and keep repeating till you get better...
Old    S. R. (stingreye)      Join Date: Oct 2012       07-22-2014, 4:23 PM Reply   
I am not familiar with the waves up there but sit on shore and observe, you can learn a lot by just watching:

1) Is everyone out there on a short board and you are going to take out a long board. The break could be a very steep takeoff and not conducive to a long board or a beginner. If you are renting a board ask the shop if its a good beginner longboard break. Most rental shops will not be renting short boards and at a short board break they would expect you to ride a long board in the white water near shore (vs surfing the actual wave which is what I think you would want to do).

2) Where is the lineup? Where are people sitting and waiting for the wave to come?

3) Time the sets. You should see something that makes sense. 5-6 waves with a lull in between. For learning, that lull in between is your greatest ally.

4) Watch those that know what they are doing paddling out. Some places you might paddle and gently stay put, duck diving, turtle rolling, what ever you need to, until the set ends. Then paddle as fast as you can to get back out there. The area right in front of where it breaks is no man's land, you do not want to be caught there, so use all your energy to avoid that area. Paddle hard and fast to get out there and you can rest after you make it. Pay attention to where people paddle out at, there may be an easier way out that going straight out and fighting it.

5) Paddle out where everyone else is, that's where you will need to catch the waves. Go further out than others so you are in the "safe zone" (A bigger wave comes and crushes you because you can't paddle over it). If you are near people, tell them you are a beginner and will wait to take waves near the end of a set. The regulars there will appreciate it because if you start trying to catch waves early in a set then they may let you take the wave and when you don't catch it, 1) someone else missed out on a good wave, 2) if guys start assuming you will never catch one they will try to catch it when you do and ignore your attempt, 3) When you paddle and miss the wave you are likely going to end up in the way of another surfer and potentially in the danger zone I spoke of earlier. If you attempt a wave near the end of a set, you won't be in the way after you don't catch it and even if you do, there will be less waves to fight getting back out. Most breaks have an etiquette where the person on the inside of the point where the wave first breaks has the right of way but not everywhere is the same. Do not catch a wave someone else is already (sometimes called "Snaking a wave"). To be honest if you go out of your way to show others there that you are really trying not to ruin their surf day, you will likely get some help or words of encouragement. Every surfer started poorly. The learning curve is just too steep to be able to do it immediately.

6) Learn what a rip tide is and how to get out of it (don't fight it paddle parallel to shore). Some places are easy to spot them, others I would struggle with it. With the sandy bottom breaks, it would churn up the sand a bit and the water would get choppy in the area. Again, by observing others, I bet you could get a clue. You see everyone paddling parallel to shore, the water is getting choppy, and you are drifting further out to see, you likely found a rip tide. Found a decent link with pics : http://www.ceoe.udel.edu/ripcurrents...ify/index.html

There are few things as rewarding as learning how to ocean surf. Its a very peaceful amazing experience. Its amazing how some peaceful glassy days you will always remember. For me, I loved it when I could go 2-3 times per week. Now that its sporadic, I am too out of shape for paddling to enjoy it like I used to. Heck, if you are serious and goal oriented to learn. Your learning curve would be dramatically shorter by just being in phenominal paddling shape. Heck paddle around our tiny wakesurf boards (they are slow for paddline) and you will get in shape quickly.

Lastly, rent the movie North Shore and I bet you will laugh at Rick Kane's first forays from wavepool surfing to ocean surfing!
Old    Markj (markj)      Join Date: Apr 2005       07-22-2014, 11:15 PM Reply   
^^^^^ Thanks for the link on rip currents. Very helpful.
Old    Arun Frances (poon)      Join Date: Dec 2001       07-23-2014, 11:21 PM Reply   
Surfing is 95% paddling and 5% Surfing. It is the funnest most organic board sport there is (my opinion). I done every board sport and surfing is the one board sport that I never got burmed out on. 30 years of surfing and counting. Enjoy!
Old    Greg D (shorewake)      Join Date: Jun 2013       07-24-2014, 6:38 AM Reply   
Know the most important rule. Don't cut anyone off!

The rule of thumb is the person on the "inside" has right of way. This means if the person closest to the peak catches it, it's their wave.

A lot of kooks get reemed out, sprayed and messed with for dropping in on experienced surfers. At least that's how it is around here in NJ.
Old    Trayson Harmon (trayson)      Join Date: May 2013       07-24-2014, 9:57 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by poon View Post
Surfing is 95% paddling and 5% Surfing. It is the funnest most organic board sport there is (my opinion). I done every board sport and surfing is the one board sport that I never got burmed out on. 30 years of surfing and counting. Enjoy!
Old    Davis (kimper)      Join Date: May 2008       07-29-2014, 4:34 PM Reply   
I had only wakesurfed. Went to Hawaii a month ago. Took a surf lesson in ocean.
My thoughts:

It sucks compard to wakesurfing.. It's mostly just paddling around fighting currents and getting like for a beginner about a 6 second ride.

Did the skills translate? Not so much for me.. Going from a 4 foot something board to a 10 foot board was crazy. It was like riding a log. Did I stand up and balance and ride in after a couple tries? Yes, but I wouldn't really call it surfing. The board was so stupidly large you just stood on it for your 6 seconds of thrill.

I'm in good shape, sorta old (41), my muscles weren't sore, but my chest where it rubbed in the board paddling was sore for days.
Old    G Netz (Bagar55)      Join Date: Aug 2013       07-29-2014, 7:52 PM Reply   
Anyone who says real surfing sucks hasn't put in the time to really learn how to surf. You don't go surfing once or twice on a big foam board and have any clue. Surfing a man made wave just can't compare. Making a late steep drop on a good size wave and fading back into a deep barrell is where it's at. Doing 1 ft airs and 360's on a consistent small man made wave just isn't that cool. It's fun don't get me wrong but it's not very balls out.
How come the line at the snack stand and the vendors tents gets extra busy when the wake surfing part of the event starts.
Old    Davis (kimper)      Join Date: May 2008       07-29-2014, 8:09 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bagar55 View Post
Anyone who says real surfing sucks hasn't put in the time to really learn how to surf. You don't go surfing once or twice on a big foam board and have any clue. Surfing a man made wave just can't compare. Making a late steep drop on a good size wave and fading back into a deep barrell is where it's at. Doing 1 ft airs and 360's on a consistent small man made wave just isn't that cool. It's fun don't get me wrong but it's not very balls out.
How come the line at the snack stand and the vendors tents gets extra busy when the wake surfing part of the event starts.
I'm sure you're completely right, but at my age living in the heart of Texas (not near a coast). I am not ever going to be the big Kahuna, so I might as well enjoy my little wave that is hassle free and fun.
I am sure anyone that really knows how to ocean surf on huge waves would find a wakesurf wave.. Meh..

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