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Old    Chase Tillett (tn_rider)      Join Date: Dec 2009       08-26-2013, 5:45 PM Reply   
I purchased a 2007 23LSV this last winter, it had 182 hours on it when I bought it. It's still in excellent condition and sits at 320 hours now. I've added a pretty decent stereo to it, as well as extensive LED work. The only two options the boat lacks are power wedge and the big motor. At what point would you guys consider selling before the hour meter keeps me from selling the boat? Thanks!
Old    Tim (dezul)      Join Date: Jul 2012       08-26-2013, 5:53 PM Reply   
I guess now that i am an experienced enough to answer the question, i would have no issue buying a boat with 500 hours. I bought mine with 120 hours on it and it now has 300. It still runs as good as the day i bought it. It comes down to if you like your boat and the wake it produces. Keep it if you are happy.
Old    Scott (scottb7)      Join Date: Oct 2012       08-26-2013, 7:37 PM Reply   
It is a funny thing as many many people are afraid of a boat with more then like 2 or 3 hundred hours. Even though these boats can go like 2000 hours or more before a rebuild. If you are not going to keep it for a long time then maybe you better sell, I dunno. I bought mine with like 580, and now has like 730.
Old    Tim (dezul)      Join Date: Jul 2012       08-26-2013, 7:53 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottb7 View Post
It is a funny thing as many many people are afraid of a boat with more then like 2 or 3 hundred hours. Even though these boats can go like 2000 hours or more before a rebuild. If you are not going to keep it for a long time then maybe you better sell, I dunno. I bought mine with like 580, and now has like 730.
I would buy a boat with 730. It is just broken in then...and probably upgraded too.
Old    Delta Force (wakebordr11)      Join Date: May 2001       08-26-2013, 7:57 PM Reply   
Chase, if I had your boat I'd never sell it...
Old    Swatguy (xstarrider)      Join Date: Jun 2007       08-26-2013, 9:19 PM Reply   
The hour meter would never have me considering selling my boat. Room, wake, storage and pocket book would though. My current ride has 1135 hours of which over 900 have been logged by me. It's been in the shop wait for it............0 times. I have blown an alternator and an MDC but other than that fluids, and regular maintenance keep this thing running like the day it came home. I have seen plenty of engines go 2k hours when well maintained.

With that said most people are very hesitant on buying when the hour meter reads 500 an above. That always seemed to be the magic number unless we are talking old 210's and Xstars in 20k range. I do know with over 1000 hrs on my boat it won't have the same appeal and it will take a small hit compare to boats it's age, but honestly I have seen boats over the years with low hours just beat to holy hell. If the boat is clean and the hours are high I think that really helps. If the boat is beat up forget it.
Old    Art (rallyart)      Join Date: Nov 2006       08-26-2013, 9:34 PM Reply   
You won't get a dime out of the LEDs and not much from a stereo.
I'd sell the boat when you found a different one that was clearly better.
My boat has 430 hours and I've only had to change the plugs once. Not exactly worn out now. I do have to say I might sell mine at 3000 hours, but then maybe I'll just keep the antique.
Old    Eric (DenverRider)      Join Date: Feb 2013       08-26-2013, 10:10 PM Reply   
Can you add the power wedge? I wanted to upgrade my last boat with a lot of sweat equity and a small chunk of cash but I realized that no matter what I did I couldn't get the hull shape that I wanted and I couldn't make a direct drive a v drive. If it wasn't for that I probably would have kept my last boat forever. Now I plan on keeping my current boat forever (until I change my plan). Upgrading is expensive and sometimes you have to way the value of having the newest bells and whistles but having to work your tail off to pay for them versus having time to use your toys and have fun. These boats can last a very long time if you take care of them with fluids and maintenance. I agree with Art that the stereo and LEDs are going to be something you take a big loss on. Used boat buyers don't see a lot of value in those things.
Old    Ron (Nordicron)      Join Date: Aug 2011       08-27-2013, 9:41 AM Reply   
Here is my take. There are a bunch of boats out there and really anything over 300hrs starts to seem on the higher side and better be reflected in the price. Like it or not, as a buyer you have choices. Example: 2 identically equipped 2008 wakesetters one has 200hrs an one has 400hrs. How much more are you willing to give for the 200hr boat? If the 400hr guy wanted $50k an the 200hr guy wanted $54k which would you choose?
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       08-27-2013, 10:22 AM Reply   
^The one in better condition and with the options/upgrades/colors I liked better.
Old    Ron (Nordicron)      Join Date: Aug 2011       08-27-2013, 11:20 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottog1979 View Post
^The one in better condition and with the options/upgrades/colors I liked better.
I said they where identical other than hours my man.

The other thing is its gonna be easier for you to sell a boat with lower hours which will also be of some value.
Old    Eric (DenverRider)      Join Date: Feb 2013       08-27-2013, 11:35 AM Reply   
Hours make a more significant difference when you are trying to get more than "value" for your boat. When I bought my 2005 SANTE last June, all of these boats were way overpriced in my opinion. They are consistently priced well over NADA values. I couldn't reconcile these high prices until I found my boat in perfect condition with only 180 hours on it. Hours were an issue because sellers were asking such a high price. At over 300 hours your 2007 already has an average amount of hours on it. You can't undo those hours so you'll already have to ask an average price in order to sell it. If you keep it for a few years and have 500 or fewer hours then you will still have an average amount of hours on the boat. You'll still have to ask an average price for it. The way boat prices have been, that average price may be the same in 3 years as it is today. Keep it for a while.
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       08-27-2013, 11:45 AM Reply   
That you did Ron. My bad.
Old    RB (boardman74)      Join Date: Jul 2012       08-27-2013, 1:00 PM Reply   
I know most say it doesn't matter, but I sell alot of boats ever year and IMO it matters ALOT. People ask hours first. They value on hours. They decide if they even want to see the boat based on hours. Its a large factor.

Example I am helping my dealer sell some remaining 2013 R20's. All have a few hours and all are sold as USED. You would be surprised the people that make a HUGE deal between 10 hours and 30 hours. Thats is insignificant and will never matter, but buyers make a big deal about it. So I can tell you they are going to make a big deal over whether said boat has 300 or 500 hours. The average is 50 per year in most places. More than that and people consider them high and want a discount. My opinion and experience. Thats having lived in the midwest and south east US.
Old    Eric (DenverRider)      Join Date: Feb 2013       08-27-2013, 1:35 PM Reply   
And your dealer RB is always trying to sell for a premium because you not only have to pay the previous owner but the middle man as well. I'm not knocking dealers so much as I'm pointing out an unavoidable fact. As a result, hours are extremely important because low hours are almost the only way to get the premium price as I mentioned. Average hours won't get you that premium. 320 hours on a 2007 is closer to average. A dealer would be required to show an average boat to a greater than average number of people until they find the person who is susceptible to a better than average sales pitch in order to sell an average hours boat for a low hours premium price. If you're not trying to sell your 2007 for the same price that you intend to pay for the 2010 that you replace it with then you are probably OK keeping it for a few years. If that is your intention, then you should have sold it 130 hours ago. You're within the 50 per year average that RB has mentioned and if it's under 500 in 3 more years then you will still be under the 50 hours per year average. It's a beautiful thing.
Old    Eric (DenverRider)      Join Date: Feb 2013       08-27-2013, 1:38 PM Reply   
On the other hand, the 2013 that you want now will be much cheaper in 3 years. The difference between used and more used will never be as extreme as the difference between bran new and a little bit used.
Old    Ron (Nordicron)      Join Date: Aug 2011       08-27-2013, 5:00 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by boardman74 View Post
I know most say it doesn't matter, but I sell alot of boats ever year and IMO it matters ALOT. People ask hours first. They value on hours. They decide if they even want to see the boat based on hours. Its a large factor.

Example I am helping my dealer sell some remaining 2013 R20's. All have a few hours and all are sold as USED. You would be surprised the people that make a HUGE deal between 10 hours and 30 hours. Thats is insignificant and will never matter, but buyers make a big deal about it. So I can tell you they are going to make a big deal over whether said boat has 300 or 500 hours. The average is 50 per year in most places. More than that and people consider them high and want a discount. My opinion and experience. Thats having lived in the midwest and south east US.
I agree! Thanks. Now could you put a value on a hour? I know its different with each boat and it depends on where the boat is in its life cycle. But lets say you have a 2010 boat what does each hour cost in depreciation? I had another tread on this but people didn't understand. It's the main reason I like having fellow boat owners as riding buddies! They come on mine and I go on theirs. Keeps hrs off everyones boats and we all get to do what we love which is ride!
Old    RB (boardman74)      Join Date: Jul 2012       08-27-2013, 5:38 PM Reply   
For me this year a quick number would be at least $150 per hour and that is breaking even selling the boat. Meaning my only cost was the payment and insurance plus gas. That is zero depreciation I sold the boat for pretty much what I paid and it still cost about $150 per hour to use it.

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