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Old    JR Smith (wakintime)      Join Date: Jul 2011       07-10-2013, 12:37 PM Reply   
I have been told you should weld the differential on my truck instead of having the factory bolting for towing boat. Anyone know about this? I have really never heard this until I went in to get ball and hitch to lower about an inch. Any one know anything about this or is this just trying to get more money?
Thanks
Old    Shred Candlewood (ShredCandlewood)      Join Date: Dec 2011       07-10-2013, 12:41 PM Reply   
Don't weld your diff.

[/thread]
Old    Eric (DenverRider)      Join Date: Feb 2013       07-10-2013, 12:56 PM Reply   
That sounds crazy. Welding the spider gears to lock the diff or welding the diff to whatever it may be attached to besides the axle tubes? They both sound crazy. There are a few ways to lock the diff with mechanical, electric, or pneumatic lockers but you would never leave them locked while towing down the road unless you want your truck to ride squirrelly and eat up your rear tires. The only reason you would ever lock the diff while towing a boat would be because you were spinning tires while trying to tow out of a rugged boat ramp in low range. Then once it was out you would unlock again. The only reason I've ever heard anyone would weld the spider gears was because they were building a low budget trail rig that they towed to the trail.
Old    Ryan (Wakesounds)      Join Date: May 2011       07-10-2013, 1:12 PM Reply   
Your post is a little unclear about what your trying to accomplish? Under no circumstances should you weld your differential for any on-road use. Its a terrible idea.
Old    JR Smith (wakintime)      Join Date: Jul 2011       07-10-2013, 1:20 PM Reply   
He says my receiver is bolted in my heavy duty tow package and it should be soldered not bolted like it came from the factory.is he just full of it?
Old    Delta Force (wakebordr11)      Join Date: May 2001       07-10-2013, 1:29 PM Reply   
Dude, first you said differential which is inside your rear axle pumpkin... now you're saying hitch receiver. What the heck are you talking about?? Bolting the hitch to the frame, receive in the hitch?
Old    Anthonyv911 (tonyv420)      Join Date: Jul 2007       07-10-2013, 1:33 PM Reply   
you must be talking about welding you trailer hitch(reciever) to the frame of your truck??? Mine is bolted on, and most are. Once you weld it on, it's there for good! You def can't be talking about soldering it on LOL Right??
Old    JR Smith (wakintime)      Join Date: Jul 2011       07-10-2013, 1:42 PM Reply   
Sorry with the confusion. He said the hitch/ receiver on our truck which is bolted on like every other truck or SUV should be soldered. Our truck has the heavy duty tow package. I just have never heard of soldering the receiver to the frame. @delta my wife calls me pumpkin. So ..
Love,
Pumpkin
Old    JR Smith (wakintime)      Join Date: Jul 2011       07-10-2013, 1:45 PM Reply   
Sorry met welded
Old    Anthonyv911 (tonyv420)      Join Date: Jul 2007       07-10-2013, 1:59 PM Reply   
Bolted is fine, my boat is 4,000lbs with trailer and my hitch is bolted on. Never had a problem
Old    Charlie Zulu (Pad1Tai)      Join Date: Jan 2013       07-10-2013, 2:57 PM Reply   
Bolting is fine just use stainless or grade 8 bolts.. I tow everything with my GMC 2500 duramax..

Just curious, where did you come up with the word "differential"?..

Also soldering is for wires...
Old    Tim C (lifetimewarranty)      Join Date: Oct 2008       07-10-2013, 3:53 PM Reply   
This:
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakebordr11 View Post
Dude, first you said differential which is inside your rear axle pumpkin...
and This:
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakintime View Post
@delta my wife calls me pumpkin. So ..
Love,
Pumpkin

Completely made my day...


But to be productive, a bolted receiver (if I understand the "normal" OEM way) is the only way I'd do it.
Old    Tim C (lifetimewarranty)      Join Date: Oct 2008       07-10-2013, 3:57 PM Reply   
If it is good enough for a Semi...(notice the 5th wheel is bolted...)
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Old    Johnny Zero (dirtrider)      Join Date: Sep 2008       07-10-2013, 5:38 PM Reply   
No need to weld it to the frame. In some cases it can be viewed as frame damage. For
example when I worked at Mercedes if we got a trade in ML or E class wagon with welded on hitch it was considered frame damage and the dealer would not resell.
Old    RB (boardman74)      Join Date: Jul 2012       07-10-2013, 6:28 PM Reply   
Never heard of welding a hitch to the frame. Always seen them bolted...factory or aftermarket. I think what you need it a new mechanic!!
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       07-11-2013, 12:49 PM Reply   
Get a Detroit Locker if you want the best. Lunchbox lockers (Lock Right, etc.) are cheap and easy to install as they replace the spider gears and do not require you to set up the gears, though they will be more noisy/clunky and not as strong. For what it's worth I run a lunchbox in my Sterling 10.25" and it works fine but is a little more clunky than a Detroit.

Don't weld your gears, that should only be done for strictly off road trucks and even then you're better off using a spool as they're cheap enough and much stronger.

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