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Old    Jamie (Wiatowski)      Join Date: Aug 2011       05-16-2012, 7:09 PM Reply   
Can/Does your stance have an effect on certain tricks or even ability to Ollie?
I'm riding boards that are right for my weight... but even though my stance is comfortable I feel it's to narrow just looking at the board. I'm riding a Paradigm 144 with Ronix Ones but using the first inserts.

Any thoughts?
Old     (TheHebrewHammer)      Join Date: Jun 2011       05-16-2012, 7:58 PM Reply   
Some cable pros I ride with say that having the widest possible stance feels better when they're pressing on rails. Personally, I ride a tiny bit narrower than that because I like to have my feet a little closer together when I'm behind the boat. It feels like I can push off harder and pop better. I can make small adjustments because I use Slingshot's fast track system.

Anyhow, when I'm setting up boards for beginners, I generally advise against using the narrowest stance option. In my experience with the boards I've worked with, this is less than ideal. I usually put people one hole in and move them out to the widest possible stance once they're comfortable so that they can try and see what works best for them.

I'd say that you should at least try a wider stance. I think you'd like it!
Old    Seahawks #1 Fan Robert T (cwb4me)      Join Date: Apr 2010       05-16-2012, 8:09 PM Reply   
As long as you can squat till your butt touches the board without knee pain you'll be alright.Go as wide as possible,but have freedom to squat out.
Old    Brian A (Brian)      Join Date: Jun 2011       05-17-2012, 8:53 AM Reply   
I don't go wide as possible because of the strain on my knees. When you are to wide, the more punishment you knees take when you have a bad wreck (behind a boat)
Old    Jamie (Wiatowski)      Join Date: Aug 2011       05-17-2012, 7:41 PM Reply   
thanks for the input will test it out... but will a wider stance make it easier to Ollie? I guess that's really my big question.
Old     (TheHebrewHammer)      Join Date: Jun 2011       05-17-2012, 8:21 PM Reply   
I think having a wider stance makes my ollies easier/better, but not everyone has the same technique, especially when you're just learning. I can't guarantee it, but I think you'll find that a wider stance will make it easier to ollie.
Old    Justin Harrelson (skiboarder)      Join Date: Oct 2006       05-17-2012, 8:36 PM Reply   
Everyone has their "right" stance on a board. For me 24-26 (depending on board size and stance options) is perfect. I'm 5-9 with average length and pretty straight legs (not bowed or knocked-kneed).

A lot of people are saying wider is better, but I'll say only to a point. I don't have knee problems, but I have torn an mcl and 3 years later tore my Acl. Both times my stance was greater than 27. I really think the wide stance played a role.
Old    DC (durty_curt)      Join Date: Apr 2008       05-17-2012, 9:41 PM Reply   
Don't you guys ever feel pain in your hips when the stance is too wide?
Old    Ben Ax (hawkeye7708)      Join Date: Feb 2007       05-18-2012, 7:51 AM Reply   
Some good insights. I use the squat technique when sizing people up for where their boots should be placed. It's all a feel thing.

However, when it comes to Ollies, yes, you stance can and will affect it. Your ollie is created when you force the tail of the board into the water, causing the water to push back and allowing you use that force to elevate your board. (--{} {}--) <--- Having your feet like this, you aren't able to exert much force on the end of the board, the water doesn't push back, and you don't maximize your ollie potential. ({}-- --{}) <--- With your feet wider, you can push that tail into the water, increase the downforce, therefore increasing the up force the water reacts with, boosting your ollie. This is all contingent on your technique, however. Line tension, edging, and pre-pop all can play a part in your ollie performance.
Old    Jamie (Wiatowski)      Join Date: Aug 2011       05-23-2012, 7:03 AM Reply   
Thank Ben and Robert... used your squat method and moved the holes out to the center ones.... this also changed the angle of my feet position for 18 degrees to 24 but it's still comfortable. before I was using the jumping method to get my stance... will see if the couple of inches make a difference.
Old    Justin Harrelson (skiboarder)      Join Date: Oct 2006       05-23-2012, 8:53 AM Reply   
Jamie, about 90% of pros ride 10-15 degrees. 24 is pretty wild.
Old    John Anderson (fly135)      Join Date: Jun 2004       05-23-2012, 2:38 PM Reply   
Interesting question. My ollies are bad and I don't have a very wide stance. OTOH my knees have endured a lot for many years with no problems. I'll have to try widening it just to see if I can improve my ollie.
Old    MCXSTAR (snork)      Join Date: Jun 2007       05-23-2012, 3:43 PM Reply   
Theres a limit to everything, do what feels comfortable
Old    Jamie (Wiatowski)      Join Date: Aug 2011       05-23-2012, 5:43 PM Reply   
it's the only way squatting that low felt comfortable... like I said with them moved in a bit I do 18... the years of playing net in hockey have taken their toll on my knees.... have to go with what feels good as I can't afford to blow one out.

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