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Old    Nauti 210 (brett33)      Join Date: Apr 2011       09-28-2011, 11:04 AM Reply   
I have a 98 Cummins 12v at my ranch and have been having some problems with it lately. I am not down there at the moment and the ranch-hand isn't exactly a "go to mechanic", so any help from you guys would be much appreciated.

From what he has been telling me the steering seemed to be stiffening up a considerable amount, checked and added power steering fluid and the problem still continued. Last week I sent him to go buy a new power steering pump. He replaced the old one, but the "steering problem" still continues! He just says it is very hard to turn, and now it is overheating regularly. Any ideas... replace the water pump? Are there any blueprints of a 12v? I have been having a tough time finding anything online..

I am heading out there (5 hour drive from my house) tomorrow morning to do some work before archery season opens this weekend, so if there is anything i need to get from the parts house i'll need to do it before the weekend.

Thanks in advance guys!
Old    Trace (trace)      Join Date: Feb 2002       09-28-2011, 11:09 AM Reply   
This shouldn't have anything to do with the make of the truck or engine. The steering system is pretty similar on all HD trucks.

The steering box could have a bearing going out. Have him jack it up and make sure the ball joints, tie rods, etc look okay and turn freely when it's in the air. Also, it should have hydroboost brakes - it could be leaking or bypassing somewhere on the brake booster side, too.

Last edited by trace; 09-28-2011 at 11:14 AM.
Old    SamIngram            09-28-2011, 11:27 AM Reply   
Could be many things. I also have a 12V Bomber truck. I had similar issues and just replaced the steering box with a new box from Borgeson and it fixed the problem I was having and improved the steering 100%.

If you are really nuts here is what my Klineman Service Manual says:

PUMP FLOW RATE AND PRESSURE

The following procedure is used to test the operation of the power steering system on the vehicle. This test will provide the flow rate of the power steering pump along with the maximum relief pressure. Perform test any time a power steering system problem is present. This test will determine if the power steering pump or power steering gear is not functioning properly. The following pressure and flow test is performed using Power Steering Analyzer Tool kit 6815 Pressure Test Gauge and Adapter Kit 6893.
POWER STEERING ANALYZER INSTALLATION
WITHOUT HYDRAULIC BOOSTER
Remove the high pressure hose from the power steering pump.
Connect Tube 6844 into the pump hose fitting.
Connect pressure gauge hose from the Power Steering Analyzer to Tube 6844.
Connect Adapter 6826 to Power Steering Analyzer test valve end.
Connect the power steering hose from the steering gear to Adapter 6826.
WITH HYDRAULIC BOOSTER
Remove high pressure hose which goes to the steering gear from the tube coming out of the booster.
Connect Adapter 6826 to the Power Steering Analyzer pressure gauge hose.
Connect pressure gauge hose to the tube coming out of the booster.
Connect Tube 6844 to the steering gear hose and Power Steering Analyzer test valve end.
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST
Check belt condition and tension.
Open the test valve completely.
Start engine and let idle long enough to circulate power steering fluid through flow/pressure test gauge and to get air out of the fluid. Then shut off engine.
Check fluid level, add fluid as necessary. Start engine again and let idle.
Gauge should read below 1034 kPa (150 psi), if above, inspect the hoses for restrictions and repair as necessary. The initial pressure reading should be in the range of 345-552 kPa (50-80 psi)
Increase the engine speed to 1500 RPM and read the flow meter. If the flow rate (GPM) is below specification (Refer to pump specification chart for GPM) the pump should be replaced
CAUTION: The following test procedure involves testing maximum pump pressure output and flow control valve operation. Do not leave valve closed for more than three seconds as the pump could be damaged.
Close valve fully three times and record highest pressure indicated each time. All three readings must be above specifications and within 345 kPa (50 psi) of each other.
Pressures above specifications but not within 345 kPa (50 psi) of each other, replace pump.
Pressures within 345 kPa (50 psi) of each other but below specifications, replace pump.
Open the test valve and turn the steering wheel to the extreme left and right positions three times against the stops. Record the highest pressure reading at each position. Compare the readings to the pump specifications chart. If pressures readings are not within 50 psi of each other, the gear is leaking internally and must be repaired
CAUTION: Do not force the pump to operate against the stops for more than 2 to 3 seconds at a time because, pump damage will result.
PUMP SPECIFICATION
ENGINE RELIEF PRESSURE (P.S.I.) FLOW (G.P.M.) at 1500 RPM
3.9L 1400 to 1500 2.7 to 3.1
5.2L 1400 to 1500 2.7 to 3.1
5.9L 1400 to 1500 2.7 to 3.1
8.0L 1400 to 1500 2.7 to 3.1
5.9L Diesel 1450 to 1550 3.1 to 3.5
All With Hydraulic Booster 1450 to 1550 3.1 to 3.5
NOTE: After preforming test and removing Power Steering Analyzer, check power steering fluid level.

All the part #'s listed are from the Chrysler Service Department
Old    Nauti 210 (brett33)      Join Date: Apr 2011       09-28-2011, 11:39 AM Reply   
Sam- Thanks for the info... I'm sure it will come in handy when i get down there and actually look at it. I would be willing to bet replacing the steering box would make a huge difference and is probably what i am going to do, seeing as the truck is really used and driven hard. However, what would be causing the power steering pump to get hot? Im talking melting the cap hot. Ranch hand says he will turn it on and let it idle, within 10 minutes the power steering pump is scorching hot and the wheel will hardly turn.
Old    Trace (trace)      Join Date: Feb 2002       09-28-2011, 11:52 AM Reply   
The steering box is a gear pump running in reverse. It could be bypassing worn gears in the steering box, which would cause heat buildup.
Old    Nauti 210 (brett33)      Join Date: Apr 2011       09-28-2011, 11:55 AM Reply   
Thanks Trace- Im going to check the steering box out when i get there and most likely replace it. Sounds like that could be the root of the problem!
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       09-28-2011, 1:50 PM Reply   
Check out www.cumminsforum.com

We have lots of helpful members over there.
Old    Jarrod Perkins (jperkinsttu)      Join Date: Mar 2008       09-30-2011, 3:38 AM Reply   
Dieseltruckresource.com by far the best for any and all things cummins
Old    Nauti 210 (brett33)      Join Date: Apr 2011       10-03-2011, 7:44 AM Reply   
Update- So i got the new steering box installed this weekend (PITA) and i found one of the ball joints is bad, which is not allowing the truck to turn properly. So my question now is, will turning the wheel and having that ball joint out cause the heat buildup ive got going on?
Old    SamIngram            10-03-2011, 11:02 AM Reply   
Over time maybe, by putting extra strain on your pump and steering box and wearing them out, but probably not if everything is in good working order. It is possible that it is binding up so bad that it won't turn at all, in that case maybe also...

I run a demolition derby car whenever I have time to build and run one and usually just run grade 8 bolts instead of ball joints and have never had a problem. I run the bolts instead, because the ball joints will pop off if hit the right way and leave the car stranded without steering. I have bent plenty of the bolts, but have never broke one and have never had steering box problems.
Old    Trace (trace)      Join Date: Feb 2002       10-03-2011, 11:18 AM Reply   
I agree with Sam - can't see a worn ball joint causing heat buildup, especially if it does it while sitting and idling. How do you know it's actually overheating? Most things under the hood tend to be way too hot to touch anyway. If it is really overheating, I would start looking on the brakes side of the circuit.

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