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Old    Brian Deegan (irishrider92)      Join Date: Jun 2009       06-21-2011, 2:58 AM Reply   
So I got a pair of Franks a month ago and am loving them cept for one problem. Whenever I take a kinda long set (~20mins) my arches start to hurt, and then hurt when I come out of them. It definitely feels like muscle pain at the base of my foot and I've heat molded them twice, the second time while standing up. Any advice?
Old    Jeremy Byrom (wakerider111)      Join Date: Jul 2006       06-21-2011, 10:03 AM Reply   
don't think heat molding is gona do it.
maybe the arches are too defined for your foot?
maybe your stance width or angle is putting pressure on the insides of your feet somehow?

don't think i have any other thoughts...
Old    Brian Deegan (irishrider92)      Join Date: Jun 2009       06-21-2011, 1:44 PM Reply   
Yeah I was thinking it might be my width/angle. I have them at full duck and 1 hole in on a 142 phoenix which I think is 27", but I've ridden roughly the same stance width and duck on 09 Company's. I'll try a less ducked angle and maybe move in a hole and let you know.
Old     (TheHebrewHammer)      Join Date: Jun 2011       06-21-2011, 4:10 PM Reply   
Full duck is a pretty crazy angle if you ask me. I've never seen anyone ride like that. I ride at 12 degrees each foot, which is exactly half the ducking range of my bindings. I definitely think that might be contributing to your pain, and I imagine it would make riding pretty awkward as well.
Old    Ben Wilcox (benjaminp)      Join Date: Nov 2008       06-21-2011, 4:41 PM Reply   
^As far as I know, full duck doesnt mean all the way out. Nobody can comfortably ride with both feet at 25+ degrees, thats inhuman. I second changing your stance a bit though, just tweak some stuff to see if it helps. Any chance you can check out the footbed of the Companys and look for differences that you might be able to change in the Franks?
Old    Jordan Podsiad (jpods22)      Join Date: Sep 2008       06-24-2011, 11:46 AM Reply   
I've tried them on and they aren't very comfortable in my opinion. I say that in the nicest way cuz I like easy e. But to note on The arch, I didn't really feel one. Could be your problem.
Old    Jamie Corvin (Bumpass1)      Join Date: Oct 2010       06-24-2011, 2:40 PM Reply   
Sorry to hijack, but how do you heat mold the boot?I am looking to get some new bindings and saw that many of the Ronix heat form to your foot.
Old    Brian Deegan (irishrider92)      Join Date: Jun 2009       06-26-2011, 2:44 PM Reply   
Quote:
Nobody can comfortably ride with both feet at 25+ degrees, thats inhuman.
Guess I'm inhuman. Yeah I was riding at 25 degrees and actually liked it. I've been talking to a mate of mine and he says he gets it on his obrien boots too but once they're broken in it goes away. Guess I just need to ride more.

There's a bunch of ways to heat mold. If you're near a shop that has a special machine to do it, go there. Otherwise a bath filled with water round 80 Celsius works too. Just get them warm, put your feet in and tighten the bindings. The foam will shrink in some places but also expand in others. I found the toe box way too big when I got them but now its almost water tight.

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