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Old    Joe Sellhausen (joesell)      Join Date: Apr 2001       05-09-2010, 6:12 PM Reply   
My truck is starting to look a little rough. It has at least 1 scratch in every panel. I should take it to a professional and have it done, but I'd kind of like to learn.

Can someone point me in the right direction please?
Old    Aaron Ware (99_slaunch)      Join Date: Oct 2005       05-09-2010, 6:21 PM Reply   
Buffing a car or truck is nothing like doing a boat. It is very easy to burn through the paint/clear coat especially on the edges. If you have never done this before I would recommend an orbital waxer with a fine compound verses a buffer. The waxer may not be enough to get the scratches out though. For some one who has never done this I would say spend a few hundred and take it to a reputable detail shop and tell them what you want.
Old    Cliff (ord27)      Join Date: Oct 2005       05-09-2010, 6:48 PM Reply   
It's a truck. Let it ride....
Old    Joe Sellhausen (joesell)      Join Date: Apr 2001       05-09-2010, 10:49 PM Reply   
To be honest, I have been letting my truck ride. However, my kids just put a nice scratch in my girls new car.

I have a big pile of shii sitting on the driveway that I can practice on. So I figured I could practice on the junker, get better on my truck, then fix her car easy.

But you guys are saying it's that hard?
Old    Aaron Ware (99_slaunch)      Join Date: Oct 2005       05-10-2010, 6:08 AM Reply   
Not hard. Just run the buffer at slow speeds. Keep away from edges and keep the buffer moving(don't stay in one spot). Definitely practice on the junker. I would recomend using a fine cut compound.
Old    KStateAlumni (bbeach)      Join Date: Jul 2002       05-10-2010, 8:12 AM Reply   
clay bar it first... the polish out scratches, then wax...
Old    RTH (gotboost)      Join Date: Jun 2007       05-10-2010, 8:13 PM Reply   
Check out www.adamspolishes.com. They have a lot of great products and instructional videos to get your paint looking better than new.
Old    michael morton (mortbike)      Join Date: Feb 2005       05-10-2010, 9:02 PM Reply   
clay bar then a polish such as menzerna , also the best tool for this as you are a novice is the flex tool 3401, very pricey but worth every penny!!! i use it on my houseboat, supra 24ssv, truck and cars, check out properautocare.com outstanding customer service and support as to what products you need.
Old    Joe Sellhausen (joesell)      Join Date: Apr 2001       05-11-2010, 7:09 AM Reply   
Thanks a lot guys this is the stuff I'm looking for. I'm a big do-it-yourselfer. I actually look forward to new challanges.
Old    Brad Lenderman (bradlayinlow)      Join Date: Mar 2010       05-11-2010, 7:32 AM Reply   
if they arent that bad you can get some polish put it on there then get a buffer and keep the buffer at about a 15 degrees angle and just go over the scratches 2 or 3 times if that dont work. you need to get some really fine sandpaper and wet sand it and then buff it out.
Old    Bawshogg (bawshogg)      Join Date: Dec 2005       05-11-2010, 7:46 AM Reply   
Just use a scotchbrite pad on the whole truck. Then at least it will all look the same, you won't have to worry about scratches.

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