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Go Back   WakeWorld > >> Wakeboarding Discussion Archives > Archive through June 30, 2009

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Old    Henry Gates (captain_vilfo)      Join Date: Apr 2007       06-26-2009, 6:26 AM Reply   
I have an issue about waiting to throw my backroll. For some reason or another I always break at the waist and try to throw my backroll off the wake and as a result I consisantly get half the air I normally get and case the wake. Now I've landed one already, the one I somehow magically waited on, so I know this trick is possible!

Do any of you know about any tips the could help me get the mindset to wait until I am at the top of wake to start rotating this trick? I've already heard it all, carve all the way up the wake and stand tall! But my problem is just mental and maybe one of you guys has a solution that might have worked on you.
Old    Ridin Dirty (duffy)      Join Date: Feb 2006       06-26-2009, 8:30 AM Reply   
Treat as a wake jump and then at the last second lean your head towards your back shoulder and let your legs go out from underneath you. Make sure you keep your line tight, that is what pulls you around. It sounds like your trying to HUCK it!
Old    Justin Thompson (tchs22)      Join Date: Sep 2005       06-26-2009, 11:11 AM Reply   
hahaha I had the same problem....I rode with one of my buddies who throws a HUGE backroll...he told me to take a hard cut (not a raliey cut) and ride all the way up and thru it....wake takes care of rest...just do it and dont think about it lol....
Old    Garret Schmidt (garret_s)      Join Date: Apr 2006       06-26-2009, 12:48 PM Reply   
Backroll is a trick that people complicate unnecessarily. If you are breaking at the waist, you are leaving too early and probably trying to huck it.

The best advice I can give you is this: Think of your cut like a half crescent. You should continue accelerating all the way through the wake. However, your cut doesn't stop there...you want to continue to cut away from the boat as you are riding up the wake, with your head over your left shoulder (if you're regular). Lots of people say to tuck your head to your back shoulder: don't do this. It causes you to leave the wake way early, and put way too much pressure on your back foot.

Instead, keep your weight over both feet equal, and just look over your left shoulder (basically, look back at the wake wash). This way, when you pop, you will already have your head in the right position to spot the landing.

Good luck.
Old    Henry Gates (captain_vilfo)      Join Date: Apr 2007       06-26-2009, 9:13 PM Reply   
Yeah I am trying to huck it which is causing me these issues. You guys gave me some pretty solid advice and Ill be sure to put it to some use tomorrow.

Any more on the subject would be most appriciated.
Old    Roddyrod (wakeslife)      Join Date: Jul 2005       06-26-2009, 9:45 PM Reply   
Garret is spot on with the cut. I've been throwing this trick and landing it about 3 out of 4 for two seasons, but just recently really figured out the ideal edge. Start the edge slowly, and then really get on the gas when you get to the bottom of the wake. The tension built up if you hold that edge will do all the work initiating the flip, and just keep the handle in close and you will stick it no problem.

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