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Old    Steve Jones (steve_jones)      Join Date: Jun 2006       01-28-2007, 10:42 PM Reply   
For Brannon (full speed): The Raley was my 3rd major trick and I never fell learning it, not even once. I did hit my bootie a couple times and it slapped pretty hard, but I stood up the trick. If you want to learn it, you can learn without falling but you have to have patient and respect each piece of the puzzle. I actually learned it on accident by trying to jump the wake as big as I could. One jump got behind me a little and I managed to recover. The rest was just repeating it and understanding the wake dynamics of snapping the board behind you. It’s like that first time you jumped the wake, only faster and higher.

A full detailed breakdown would take too long to write but here is a shorter breakdown of how to learn it without dying.

Baby step 1: You must have a super solid wake jump down, into the flats, staying in good form the whole time (standing tall, board slightly in front of you, handle by hips, looking for the landing, fairly relaxed in the air). The more you do this, you will naturally learn and understand what happens when you leave off your back foot too much (stargaze or big backroll) or leave off your front foot too much (back flip to back and bootie, or head/face plant). Doing this enough times will teach you to weight your feet equally into, through, and off the wake. (I actually think getting this down is much harder than the Raley.)

Step 1: Build up your heel side jump way into the flats. Get this down super solid. Go as far and as big as you can, but work up to it. Take an entire day or two if you need to and build up to the speed and distance…as far as you can. Don’t do anything else. Repetition is key. In all honesty, I could stop here because most people don’t have the patience to get this down….but just in case you are different…

Step 2: Repeat step 1 until you are seriously sick of it. To the point where you don’t give it a second thought and you are irritated to move on.

Step 3: Start thinking about standing as tall as you can and pointing your toes as you jump. Not a lot, just a little at first. Again, work up to it. The board will get behind you just a little as you build up each jump. Let it go.

Recover (after the peak of the jump) by pulling the handle with both hands (evenly, steadily, and strong) right to your thighs. This is called the safety position. Do this after you feel the big tug at the peak. As long as you recover correctly, the board will land in front of you and hit the water first EVERY single time. This will save you EVERY single time. Worst case if done correctly; when the board hits the water, sit down, collapse, and abort to the outside by doing a tumble turn / fall. You’ll slide out on your back with no fall at all.

Once you start pointing your toes on every big jump, you will naturally build up to the point where the board gets snapped behind you and you feel the “tug” at the peak of the jump. Not quite a full Raley yet, but you are on your way. DO NOT go to step four until this is comfortable for you. Spend another day if you need to. Take your time… or you’ll get worked.

Step 4: Once you start feeling the board snap behind you off the wake, you will naturally relax your body and let the board drift back and up, while you stretch out your arms. I don’t know why, but everyone seems to do this without thinking so go with it.

Wait…wait…wait…until you feel the tug of the boat/rope and then recover to your safety position, and look for the landing. BOOYA, you’ll land your first Raley.

Some people will say to try this off of a wakeskate. I actually tried a few this way but it was more for fun than anything. Some will argue that it can teach you the snap and recovery and it’s probably right so that’s another option to try. Just watch your bootie on the reentry into the water. Everyone learns differently so find what you are not afraid to try and build up to it.

Another one of my favorite tricks because of the drift is the 911 or Indy Glide. It’s a little scary but once you can do a Raley, you can learn the lookback and drift for the 911 or Indy Glide. We were a little jittery at first, but Brady Sammons and I learned the 911 in one night with zero falls. We broke it down, talked about it, and just guinea pigged a few. Get a buddy that’s learning the same tricks you are and it will push you and give you someone to figure things out with.

Good luck.
Steve Jones
Old    Roddyrod (wakeslife)      Join Date: Jul 2005       01-30-2007, 8:24 PM Reply   
Good advice!
What tricks, besides a huge wake jump into the flats like you said, do you suggest one to have under their belt before they start attempting Raleys?
Old    sean mckenna (marbles)      Join Date: Sep 2006       01-31-2007, 9:34 AM Reply   
What do you mean by "pointing your toes" as you jump?
Old    Eubanks (eubanks01)      Join Date: Jun 2001       02-02-2007, 12:40 PM Reply   
Rod - They aren't any "tricks" or inverts that are building blocks to the raley. So I would say none. It's more about technique and being able to load the line and stand tall than it is about anything else. The raley was my second big trick behind a backroll. Most people will learn less intimidating tricks first, but if the raley is a trick you want to learn, you sure don't need to have other inverts under your belt first.

Sean - Let me put it another way. Instead of being centered on your board from your toes to heels (or slightly on your heels) like most wake jumps...you instead will let the board get behind you a bit as you're leaving the wake. It is a scary and weird feeling at first but you will begin to crave it! You'll definitely feel your stomach muscles not wanting to let your feet behind you. Good luck!
Old    Steve Jones (steve_jones)      Join Date: Jun 2006       02-02-2007, 1:33 PM Reply   
Rod, you don't need any tricks to learn this. Just be able to jump the wake really big and stay in control.

Sean, exactly that, point your toes and the board will start to naturally get behind you. Re-read the how to and try a few. It will make sense.
Old    sean mckenna (marbles)      Join Date: Sep 2006       02-03-2007, 2:35 PM Reply   
At what point do you "relax" your shoulders and let the board drift out behind you?
Old    Curt Bernstein (curtbernstein)      Join Date: Aug 2004       02-05-2007, 1:21 PM Reply   
if you want to avoid dying trying this trick... make sure get a good pop off the wake, and be aware of your wake... for instance... I ride off of an air 210 and the wake is on average, steeper than most boats, and therefore if you go into the wake with too much speed and edge (which most people do when trying this trick for the first time).. you might end up cuting through the wake without getting any pop... this will result in death. know your wake!
Old    Curt Bernstein (curtbernstein)      Join Date: Aug 2004       02-05-2007, 1:24 PM Reply   
ohh.. heres a link from when i landed my first one... it better explains what im trying to say:

http://www.wakeworld.com/MB/Discus/messages/3184/336831.html?1168343259
Old    Steve Jones (steve_jones)      Join Date: Jun 2006       02-05-2007, 3:03 PM Reply   
Sean, good question but don't overthink this.

The board drifting behind you, and relaxing your arms will take place at about the same time; but will take place because the board gets "snapped" behind you by the wake. (Re-read that.)

As you build up to it and get this dialed in, the energy from the wake will snap (pull) the board behind you, and it will feel like you are going over the front. As it does (build up to this) let it go more and more each time. Your arms will naturally extend/relax as this happens. No matter how far the board drifts behind you, or your arms stretch in front of you, you can always recover by going to the safety position. Building up to it is the key. It's pathetically easy and will come to you with time.

Now what Curt has eluded to (for use later on with other Raley based tricks) is that you can approach the wake in different ways and with different speeds to get more or less pop (and height). 100% right but a little advanced for someone learning the basic Raley. You will naturally adjust to your wake by building up to this trick. And pointing your toes, will naturally help you pop. I didn't explain why on any of the steps but trust that it will come together for you, if you take your time with each step.
Old    Justin Rodier (jwr)      Join Date: Jan 2006       02-13-2007, 4:12 PM Reply   
So, how far into the flats do you think I should be going before I try this trick? like 10 feet?
Old    cameron (cameron)      Join Date: Feb 2007       02-13-2007, 6:22 PM Reply   
Rayley off the wakeskate, rope about 50ft, boat loaded and going about 20mph..

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Old    Randy (dudeman)      Join Date: Mar 2005       02-13-2007, 7:49 PM Reply   
cameron, I never understood why people would say to try the raley off a wakeskate first, but after looking at your pics, it makes perfect sense.
Old    J2 (zuka666)      Join Date: Aug 2005       02-13-2007, 8:38 PM Reply   
See that first pic...get your a$$ in the water or don't bother! Serious...
Old    marc (7890303)      Join Date: Sep 2006       03-17-2007, 2:30 PM Reply   
Niice...I like the wake skate version for learning porposes, I think i'll try that, thanks

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