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Old     (pesos)      Join Date: Oct 2001       08-06-2017, 2:29 PM Reply   
Interesting (and somewhat scary) read.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine...ration/534198/
Old     (ralph)      Join Date: Apr 2002       08-06-2017, 7:25 PM Reply   
Not just a generation but humanity in general. I'm on holiday in Veitnam at the moment, it's striking when out and about how many people are glued to their phones. Not just tourists but locals too, almost everyone. I've been leaving my phone in the room so I don't keep playing with it myself when out. Addicted.
Old     (flatbroke)      Join Date: Jun 2013       08-06-2017, 7:58 PM Reply   
Took my oldest daughter (22) and her girlfriend (28?) out to Railroads and Vics last weekend for a little riding while the Wife was in Hawaii with the 3 little kids. From the time we left the house at 8:30 until the time we got home at 11:30 p.m. they were Snappin. So much so that one of their phones was on the charger at any given time all day. Both of them got a bunch of great sets at both Vics and RRs, but damn! I have never seen anyone so connected to their "device" in my life.

Until yesterday.

On our way home from Orwood again at 6:00 p.m. and about to hit the San Mateo bridge when "ding ding ding" - the check engine light comes on in the Yukon. "Coolant Overheated" message and "reduced power". With no where to pull over, I had to drive another 1/2 mile before there was a shoulder to pull off. Ended up snagging some fittings and hose clamps off of the Sanger and using the remainder of the cooler full of bottled waters to get it across the bridge and home.

The one thing I noticed as I was running back and forth from the front of the car to the boat for "supplies" was that not only were my 2 "littles" (12 and 10) on their devices and oblivious to what was going on but so was my Wife who was busy "snappin" her girlfriends about what was happening. Kind of disturbing being that we were only a foot or so off of the road and cars were flying by at 70+.

Wes, that article is interesting if only for the fact that it puts into better words than I can, what I notice in my own home. Im sure there's another survey or study that would debunk everything in that link but from where Im at and what Ive seen with 4 kids (3 with phones) and a Wife who's always connected it rings fairly consistent with my house. Lack of sleep, depression - yes it is scary.

I was reading a local paper front page article while getting coffee a few months back. It was about rehab for kids in China who were deemed "addicted" to devices - phones, tablets or otherwise and the attempt to socialize these kids before they have some very serious issues. Wonder if there is anything like that happening here in the States?
Old     (flatbroke)      Join Date: Jun 2013       08-06-2017, 8:10 PM Reply   
I also find it a little ironic that I read this on social media.
Old     (pesos)      Join Date: Oct 2001       08-06-2017, 9:07 PM Reply   
Social media is certainly a part of it but I feel like mobile devices are what really make the difference and have taken things to a new level. Hard for a family to even get some quality time. I look at my girls who are only 2.5 yrs and wonder where things will be in 10 years when they're clamoring for their own phones (yeah I know, they'll want them long before then). Even now I worry about little things - just the difference between the little screen time we do allow them already and what we had when we were kids... i.e. "back in our day" we had to wait for whatever it was we wanted to come on the tv. Missed it? Too bad. Now they can watch whatever they want exactly when they want it, etc.
Old     (grant_west)      Join Date: Jun 2005       08-07-2017, 7:15 AM Reply   
Anderson Cooper/60 Mins did a show about How progrmers are encouraged to make Apps "like Snapchat" more addictive. Programmers are making apps and social media platforms hook users by studying the brain. Sounds crazy I know. But you only have to look at any teen ager and you will see the are addicted to the "social media platforms and apps" yes they use the phone to do it. They also went over how Programmers know these apps they are making are addictive and engaging but they question how are these highly additive programs making the lives of the users better. I think we as a society will look back at this time and laugh at how smart phones, Facebook,Snapchat,Instagram stole so much of our time and moments with their kids,


Parents want your kids back
Get rid of their smart phone and get them a flip phone.
Old     (sidekicknicholas)      Join Date: Mar 2007       08-07-2017, 8:04 AM Reply   
Quote:
Parents want your kids back
Get rid of their smart phone and get them a flip phone.
I think this is the wrong answer .... phones aren't just phones anymore, and going back to just a phone isn't an option. I think kids being "lost" to phones is to be expected on nothing more than what phones have become.... while their parents don't fully understand it. I remember my first phone, I could call and play snake, thats about it. Currently my phone is more powerful than the laptop that got me through college (only like 7 years ago).

I think the vast majority of social media aspects of the phone are terrible time-sucks and for the most part completely useless, but so much good can be done with the phone too. On an average day my phone helps me in a thousand ways, that have only been around for a few years and I already completely take for granted. Yesterday my wife and I went shopping and to get dinner for her B-day... by like 2:00p my phone was at 40% battery and I couldn't figure out how the hell that happened.... but it does everything.
* 60 minute drive using spotify
* sending directions to my car via google maps
* making a dinner reservation
* price checking every bigger purchase that day while still in the store
* pulling up measurements of our house to make sure furniture fits
* pulling up photos of SKUs for folks at the checkout line
* Paying with my phone

.... its insane. It does everything. I think there are significant downsides to the way kids are being consumed by a phone, and I really think the problem is compounded by parents who DIDN'T grow up with this type of tech.

The baby-boomber vs. millennial battle is crazy to me... Baby boombers **** alllll over millennials, but they're the ones who raised them ... if they're ****ty kids, its their fault. This generation gap is more significant than any before because of the tech. I really think once folks my age (29) start pooping out kids you'll see a much more controlled use of tech in parenting, because for the most part, we know how to use it. I couldn't reasonably expect someone my parents age to do a good job of parenting in the tech world we have today.... when you understand less about a subject than the person you're trying to protect from that subject, you're setup for failure.

Last edited by sidekicknicholas; 08-07-2017 at 8:07 AM.
Old     (buffalow)      Join Date: Apr 2002       08-07-2017, 8:32 AM Reply   
I have a few simple rules in my house to help combat this (20 year old daughter/10 year old son).

1. Wifi turns off at 9:00 on the whole house. So no late night nonsense.
2. When they hit their data limit, they get no more for the month
3. I give acces to wifi to no one. I connected my family to it when I set it up and thats it. When you come to my home to visit my family, you will visit my family - not live on your damn phone. I know that my (4) teenage nieces do not agree with my policy, but I could care less.
4. On the boat - no cell phones - the occasionally photo during the day is ok, but thats it. This is one of the last places on the planet we can have our families and friends just sharing time together.

I realize times have changed and I see it every day, but I try to control what I can.
Old     (grant_west)      Join Date: Jun 2005       08-07-2017, 10:00 AM Reply   
^^^ My nephews came from LA to visit last week. They walked in the door and greeted us and the first thing they wanted was What's the Wi-Fi code! I felt like WTF you just got here you have not even unloaded your car and your need wi-fi.
Back to my point. Stupid Snapchat has these ridiculous thing called "streams" I don't even understand them fully, that reward users for constantly using the app. The 60 min show said that some teenagers give their friends their password to the apps so that the friends can log into the apps and keep posting for them so as they don't loose their "stream" F..King STUPID! Jason Good point on not passing out your wifi and turning it off at a certain time.
Old     (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       08-07-2017, 10:27 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by sidekicknicholas View Post
The baby-boomber vs. millennial battle is crazy to me... Baby boombers **** alllll over millennials, but they're the ones who raised them ... if they're ****ty kids, its their fault. This generation gap is more significant than any before because of the tech. I really think once folks my age (29) start pooping out kids you'll see a much more controlled use of tech in parenting, because for the most part, we know how to use it. I couldn't reasonably expect someone my parents age to do a good job of parenting in the tech world we have today.... when you understand less about a subject than the person you're trying to protect from that subject, you're setup for failure.
haha but the tech that will exist when your kid is 12 or 14 will be different than today, and your kids will use it differently than you do (likely in a way we haven't thought of yet). The "we'll do it better than our parents" thing has been tried for generations. You might do one thing better but you'll find a way to F em up one way or another. We all do!

That said the grumpy old man contingent on this thread is STRONG. I just spent a week on a houseboat with my wife, my son, and five of my son's friends, all just-graduated from high school. We were on shasta and for the most part had killer LTE coverage. Yes, they updated their snapchat stories, but they also spent a crap ton of time swimming, wakeboarding, and tubing, and stayed up late every night playing monopoly of all things.

Spending a week with these kids really made me feel good that our future is in good hands, snapchat be damned.
Old     (wakemitch)      Join Date: Jun 2005       08-07-2017, 5:03 PM Reply   
I read the Atlantic article on friday and instantly designed a lesson for my sociology class that I will teach tomorrow. I want the kids (11-12th grade) to annotate it with what they agree with and what they believe to be false or a generalization. They are studying perspective, so it will be interesting for them to read an article about their lives from the perspective of a baby boomer (50-60yr old)
Old     (bcrider)      Join Date: Apr 2006       08-08-2017, 9:08 AM Reply   
I snapped this pic saturday morning while I had my kids at the skate park. Have no idea what these people were waiting for but figured it summed up today's society.

I also wouldn't blame just the kids. I know just as many older people just like the photo that are no better.
Attached Images
 
Old     (onthecreek)      Join Date: Apr 2013       08-09-2017, 12:10 PM Reply   
[QUOTE=grant_west;1964649]A...Programmers are making apps and social media platforms hook users by studying the brain.../QUOTE]

This starts happening before kids even get their own phones. Disney and other sites target kids as young as 4 or 5 with games they can't resist. It's nothing terribly new. Donkey Kong, Mario Bros, Tetris...anyone writing a program wants people to get hooked. Big business fast food studies how to make our bodies crave their food. Buyer beware out there.
Old     (azeus17)      Join Date: Feb 2010       08-17-2017, 6:41 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakemitch View Post
I read the Atlantic article on friday and instantly designed a lesson for my sociology class that I will teach tomorrow. I want the kids (11-12th grade) to annotate it with what they agree with and what they believe to be false or a generalization. They are studying perspective, so it will be interesting for them to read an article about their lives from the perspective of a baby boomer (50-60yr old)
I would be very interested to hear their perspective. Please update us when you can.
Old     (wakemitch)      Join Date: Jun 2005       08-17-2017, 12:14 PM Reply   
The kids went into it thinking they would disagree with everything. But as they read they said that there were mainly generalizations, but said they agreed with and related to much of it as the article went on. They were surprised to see that what they experience is happening at a societal level (I had just taught them about sociological imagination). They were very surprised to see the differences between differences in generations like sex, drug use, and driving, but they understood.

I had them annotate the article and answer a few questions at the end. It was amazing how much they got into it. If youre interested I can scan a couple and share.
Old     (markj)      Join Date: Apr 2005       08-17-2017, 8:28 PM Reply   
Share away!
Old     (ralph)      Join Date: Apr 2002       08-18-2017, 6:48 PM Reply   
Keen to see it also

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