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Old     (SangerTom)      Join Date: Aug 2010       04-29-2019, 4:18 PM Reply   
First trip to powell is booked in August. Driving from So Cal. What do I need to know about the drive and towing so I don't trash the boat on the way.
Old     (TomH)      Join Date: Jan 2014       04-30-2019, 9:25 AM Reply   
For long trips - first order of business is cover on or off. Cover off prevents cover rub on the gel and rub-rail, but can let the boat get pretty damn dirty. Personally, for that length of a trip, I prefer to tow covered with a few caveats so that I can carry additional gear in the boat unless you have a ton of gear space in the truck. If you do go covered, I'd recommend doing several wraps of saran or pallet wrap where the cover contacts, which should prevent any damage from the cover. I would also wrap the tower in saran wrap for that length of trip to keep the bugs/dirt off (much faster to apply/remove saran wrap than to scrub bugs off a tower...).

On to the trailer; service your bearings/hubs. If it's been a while, just replace the bearings, as they're pretty cheap and it's easy to do. If you have oil baths, make sure the oil level is good. On long trips I tend to keep a full bearing set and grease in the truck on the off-chance something goes haywire. It's also not a bad idea to just keep a full on hub/bearings assembled and ready to go - which is an easier swap on the side of the road. If you have bearing buddies, don't over-pressure them, as it's a good way to blow a grease seal. Check out your brakes and make sure they're working (check fluid level/add/re-bleed as necessary).

Make sure your tires are relatively current (by date code on the tires). If they're older than 5-years, consider replacing them. Make sure the tires and spare are fully aired up. Trailer tires are only at their stated capacity when at their maximum pressure.

Have all the tools on hand to jack up your trailer (either extra jack or make sure your truck's jack will get you there) and to change a tire/hub/bearings, and make sure you have sockets/tire iron of the correct size for the trailer lugs. Keep the tools accessible so you don't have to unload the whole truck on the side of the road to access them.

Rock-tamers or the like on the truck will help minimize boat damage from anything kicked up by the truck tires.
Old     (cbarguy1)      Join Date: Dec 2012       04-30-2019, 9:46 AM Reply   
Awesome advice from Tom, can't really add much to that. The number 1 issue to watch for is wheel bearings. If you have any doubt about their condition replace them. A failed wheel bearing can waste your axle and that will ruin you trip, guaranteed. And cost you a pile of money.
Old     (SangerTom)      Join Date: Aug 2010       05-03-2019, 2:35 PM Reply   
Great tips. Thank you. I was wondering about the saran wrap idea for the cover.... i like the idea for the tower too.

Tires are 3 years old. May change them just to be safe. I think I will replace the bearings to be safe.
Old     (fish6942)      Join Date: Dec 2005       05-03-2019, 3:07 PM Reply   
At every stop, do a walk around of the trailer and touch the hubs to check for excessive heat.
Old     (Shawn)      Join Date: Aug 2011       05-04-2019, 4:12 PM Reply   
Have not actually ever had to try it, but have seen others recommend to coat the front of the tower and speakers with Pam cooking spray...then the wipe down once you arrive is a lot easier vs having all the bugs caked on.

Other than that, with your boat in your driveway and your garage door CLOSED...between everything in your truck and boat, can you successfully jack up your trailer and change a tire? Middle of nowhere sucks to discover that your car jack is too small without blocks or you don't have the correct tire iron for your trailer.

Having blown a hub...if it is anywhere closer to time for trailer service repack the bearings or at minimum hit them with the grease gun.

Last edited by Shawn; 05-04-2019 at 4:17 PM.
Old     (Summer225)      Join Date: Apr 2016       05-05-2019, 2:15 AM Reply   
I’ve always wanted to go to Powell! Looks so beautiful, SangerTom are you staying on a houseboat if so which service are you using?
Old     (SangerTom)      Join Date: Aug 2010       05-05-2019, 3:41 PM Reply   
We are going from Wahweep / aramark
Old     (srock)      Join Date: Mar 2002       05-06-2019, 2:56 AM Reply   
I'll add one item. Make sure if you use your vehicle jack that it will work on your trailer. Vehicle jacks are often too tall to get under the axle and too short to get to the frame.
Old     (wombat2wombat)      Join Date: Sep 2018       05-06-2019, 9:28 AM Reply   
For trailer jacks you can't go wrong with this one

https://www.amazon.com/Trailer-Aid-T...2CTDYCZWHKQYKK

Needed it one & it made life so much easier
Old     (bcrider)      Join Date: Apr 2006       05-06-2019, 10:29 AM Reply   
Everything Tom said. I always say it's not a matter of IF you get stuck on the side of the road... it's a matter of WHEN.
Old     (SangerTom)      Join Date: Aug 2010       05-07-2019, 5:03 PM Reply   
wombat - i have one of those jacks. they are great to travel with.
Old     (ryand121)      Join Date: Feb 2007       06-09-2019, 5:16 AM Reply   
I have always carried a laser temp gun in my truck. Everytime you stop for fuel or anything, check your trailer hub temps and get an idea of what they normally run in good condition. If you get one thats running hotter than the others you can catch a problem before it actually fails.
Old     (Medium)      Join Date: Aug 2011       06-13-2019, 5:01 AM Reply   
Get AAA Premier coverage with RV/Trailer coverage. Your boat railer will be covered for a 100 mile tow if you have a breakdown that you cant fix on the side of the road.

I just spent $600 to flat tow my boat 20 miles when I had a bearing go bad on a long trip.
Old     (TomH)      Join Date: Jan 2014       06-14-2019, 6:30 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medium View Post
I just spent $600 to flat tow my boat 20 miles when I had a bearing go bad on a long trip.
This is why I carry spare bearings/seals/grease on longer trips. I can do bearings in a half hour roughly. Sure, doing it on the side of the road sucks, but sure beats a $600 tow. If you carry a spare hub with everything pre-assembled, it's a really quick swap.
Old     (TomH)      Join Date: Jan 2014       06-14-2019, 6:24 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryand121 View Post
I have always carried a laser temp gun in my truck. Everytime you stop for fuel or anything, check your trailer hub temps and get an idea of what they normally run in good condition. If you get one thats running hotter than the others you can catch a problem before it actually fails.
My non-tech version is just to put my hand on each hub every time I stop, as my dad taught me long ago. You won't have your hand there long if you have a problem.

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