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Old     (ironj32)      Join Date: Jan 2007       03-24-2016, 3:02 PM Reply   
Any one have experience with the 10k capacity FLOE lift? Looking for some experience with minimum depth requirements.
Old     (boardman74)      Join Date: Jul 2012       03-24-2016, 6:51 PM Reply   
Hydraulic or vertical cable?
Old     (scottb7)      Join Date: Oct 2012       03-24-2016, 8:27 PM Reply   
I would not buy a floe product. There are some on my lake and none of them sit straight and the canopy is crap and that kind of thing. not glamorous but get shoremaster.

http://shoremaster.com/products/hydraulic-lift/

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/cs...502271471.html
Old     (ironj32)      Join Date: Jan 2007       03-25-2016, 5:48 AM Reply   
I've already got a hydraulic lift, and in 40" of water, I have to power it on and off, which I'm trying to get away from. The guy at the factory said that the 8k & 10k pound FLOE lifts only require about 28-30" of water. Hoping to just do some dbl checking on that.

I am open to other ideas though, I wonder how much water the Shoremaster requires?
Old     (Gary)      Join Date: Mar 2010       03-25-2016, 6:30 AM Reply   
I have a floe 8000 pound and that is pretty accurate if you have less than 30" It may need some help but nothing to terrible.
Old     (ironj32)      Join Date: Jan 2007       03-25-2016, 6:47 AM Reply   
Thanks Steve!
Old     (sidekicknicholas)      Join Date: Mar 2007       03-25-2016, 8:25 AM Reply   
My brother sells docks and lifts for a living and said that in his experience the FLOE stuff isn't any better than anything else.... he said a hydraulic Shorestation is the best he has seen since the "V" of the bunks fit inside the frame, that plus the no legs, just pads on the frame can get work in really shallow water. He said this setup can get a boat on for basically the boat's draft + 6-8" of extra water depth.

... he only had prices on stuff up to 6,000# version of that lift, he would sell a lift like that for ~$9800, thats no canopy, just the 6k# hydraulic Shorestation. Obviously 8k or 10k lifts would be more though.


** One other thing he said to be careful of with FLOE is their 10ft wide lift is 10ft from center of post to center of post, but they stash cables and mounting hardware to the inside of the posts, so you lose 6-8" of width... and with the G I would guess you need almost all of the 10 ft.

Last edited by sidekicknicholas; 03-25-2016 at 8:30 AM.
Old     (boardman74)      Join Date: Jul 2012       03-25-2016, 9:34 AM Reply   
We are in a shallow situation at our lake. I had a couple different vertical lifts and that was with much smaller lighter boats than your G. I can tell you that There is no way that its gonna go in 28 to 30 inches of water for an inboard. Maybe the guy is talking with a standard V bunk for a inboard/ outboard or outboard style boat. They are literally 8-10 inches shorter as they don't need the height to clear the fins and running gear. With inboard bunks having to be as high as they are there's no way. Out neighbor was a floe lift with a deck boat on it with the low V bunks. He's in about 30 inches of water. He has no feet on his lift and has to remove the wheels when he gets it in place. He still has to power on and off. No way if he had Inboard bunks on there he'd ever get on and off.

I have always been told hydraulics require less water than a traditional cable vertical lift. It sounds to me like you have the best set up for your situation currently.
Old     (ironj32)      Join Date: Jan 2007       03-25-2016, 10:23 AM Reply   
Thanks for the input guys!
Old     (Gary)      Join Date: Mar 2010       03-26-2016, 9:05 PM Reply   
Nick is correct about the hardware on the inside. I have plenty of room on both sides I had a Supra SE. The lowest the water got on my was 29 inches and I had to hop in the water and push it out. If you have a hard bottom shore you may have to measure the minimum height the bunks can be and cut the excess off the bottom. If that doesnt make sense its because I suck at explaining stuff
Old     (atthelake)      Join Date: Mar 2011       04-15-2016, 4:44 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottb7 View Post
I would not buy a floe product. There are some on my lake and none of them sit straight and the canopy is crap and that kind of thing. not glamorous but get shoremaster.

http://shoremaster.com/products/hydraulic-lift/

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/cs...502271471.html
It's official. I have now heard everything.

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