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Go Back   WakeWorld > >> Boats, Accessories & Tow Vehicles Archive > Archive through June 08, 2008

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Old     (spoondog)      Join Date: Feb 2008       05-22-2008, 1:50 AM Reply   
I just got my boat back from the dealer after getting the 100 hour/yearly service. My manual has a checklist of what to do and I considered doing it myself. It seemed easy enough but when I set out to do it, I realized that with my limited mechanical abilities it would take me a reeeeeaaaaally long time to do it and hopefully I wouldn't screw anything up. So I decided to just fork over the $$$$ to get it done.

Here's the question, anyone else want to do their own service but just unsure of their own ability? Something I would love to do next year is have someone who does their own servicing spend the day with me to teach me how to do it. Now here is the beneficial part to the mechanic. We get a group of people who would like to learn and meet somewhere like an empty parking lot, bring all of our tools and parts, and do it together. Everyone chippping in to pay the mechanic for his services of course. I think it would be a great way to learn and a good way for someone to make a great days wage. Since I plan on owning a boat for decades to come, I don't want to have to dish out big bucks every year to tune up my boat.(I could've really used the money I just spent on the service for stereo upgrades or some other equipment I've been eyeballing) The other plus of course is when you do it yourself, you know it gets done! How's idea sound to you guys? Would anyone be interested? I'm in the Sacramento area by the way.
Old     (loudsubz)      Join Date: Aug 2001       05-22-2008, 4:19 AM Reply   
Get a good manual with diagrams and pictures and you should be set.

Also ask as many questions on forums as you can to make sure you know exactly what you need to know and you should be comfortable. The first time is always the hardest but after that it will be second nature.
Old     (trace)      Join Date: Feb 2002       05-22-2008, 5:21 AM Reply   
I've actually never seen a good shop manual for an Indmar, no idea why.

That's a great idea to hire a mechanic to show you the basics. I bet there are some mobile boat service guys in your area, surely you could talk one of them into giving a class. It wouldn't take more than a couple hours to show you all the routine maintenance.

You will DEFINITELY save yourself a lot of money by learning how to do things yourself. Once you get the feel of things, more complicated projects will be less intimidating too.
Old     (srh00z)      Join Date: Jun 2003       05-22-2008, 4:26 PM Reply   
I have traditionally done everything myself on my boats. Inboards are pretty straight forward, V-drives are a little trickier since you have to stand on your head to do things. The computers of today's engines can throw a wrench into the works though. My recent purchase is a V-drive and I took it in for its first service to have everything checked over. I'll probably do the rest of the service myself unless I get stumped. I have seen Indmar service manuals on eBay.
Old     (watersnake)      Join Date: Jul 2006       05-22-2008, 4:46 PM Reply   
Mikey, I'm down for it! I hate shellen out the dough for stuff that I can do...with some guidence first. I'll keep an eye on this post and see if a boat mechanic steps up.
Old     (spoondog)      Join Date: Feb 2008       05-22-2008, 8:34 PM Reply   
Jesse,
I dropped my prop off at DCR this week. Just like you said, $85 for the repair and they were really cool also. Thanks dude.
Old     (ttuclint)      Join Date: Sep 2003       05-22-2008, 8:57 PM Reply   
I have this book but I really haven't looked at it too much.

http://www.marineengine.com/manuals/clymer/indmar/indmar.html
Old     (spoondog)      Join Date: Feb 2008       05-22-2008, 10:16 PM Reply   
Thanks for the link Clint. I'm going to contact them for a 2007 edition manual.
Old     (russian)      Join Date: Feb 2008       05-22-2008, 10:43 PM Reply   
Where is DCR? I need to have a prop fixed
Old     (spoondog)      Join Date: Feb 2008       05-22-2008, 10:59 PM Reply   
DCR Propeller Company is at 4946 Watt Ave #36 95660.
phone: (916) 344-8930

The $85 was because I only had 1 damaged blade. It could be more expensive depending on the size of prop and damage.
Old     (watersnake)      Join Date: Jul 2006       05-23-2008, 9:17 AM Reply   
Mikey,

Glad to hear DCR has hooked you up, I wonder if they would be down for giving WW users a discount for referrals? I'll make the call to them, maybe find out if they can advertise on this site?
Old     (ldr)      Join Date: Nov 2002       05-23-2008, 2:03 PM Reply   
Jesse,

you should get a commision. I wasn't so lucky. The prop I hit the sand bar with was unrepairable. Luckily the guy who sold me the boat also gave me a torn up spare, so torn up that DCR is charging me $135 to fix it. Plus my shaft got bent too and now i have to pay an additional $290 for a new one.

Did I mention that i got a $250 speeding ticket in Oregon the week before or that someone threw a rock through my SUV's back window the week after.

I've learned to just tell them
"put it on my tab"

as for the original post by Mikey, I would definately be interested. Or you can just come check my boat out since it's already in pieces.
Old     (watersnake)      Join Date: Jul 2006       05-23-2008, 2:47 PM Reply   
Holy bad luck!!!That sucks Matt, hopefully you broke the cycle and all is going to be smooth for the rest of the season. How long is your x-star(profile pic?) going to be in pieces? If your out for long, you can hitch a ride with me when I go out.
Old     (ldr)      Join Date: Nov 2002       05-23-2008, 9:37 PM Reply   
Yeah, I need to change the profile pic. That was my parents X they actually have a different one now, My boat is a 89 malibu sunsetter.
Old     (outlaw_78)      Join Date: Nov 2006       05-25-2008, 4:44 AM Reply   
i'm not paying some grease monkey 400 bucks to change the fluids, filters and impellers. its not hard and i'm no grease monkey
Old     (tdiggity)      Join Date: Dec 2006       05-25-2008, 7:55 AM Reply   
grease monkeys work on cars we boat mechanics prefer to be called bilge rats
Old     (05mobiuslsv)      Join Date: Apr 2006       05-25-2008, 8:42 AM Reply   
It's hard for me to pay someone to do something I can do myself.
Old     (watersnake)      Join Date: Jul 2006       05-26-2008, 1:14 PM Reply   
So all you "do it your selfers", How did you learn? or is it that simple, once you get into it? I have put normal stuff like throttle body spacer and intake manifolds,oil changes, spark plugs on my truck, just thought that a boat whould be more difficult
Old     (tj_in_kc)      Join Date: Jan 2008       05-27-2008, 7:05 AM Reply   
someone make a video and put it on youtube!
Old     (texastbird)      Join Date: May 2003       05-27-2008, 7:20 AM Reply   
Jesse a boat is no more difficult to work on than a car. In many cases, the engine is more accessible that a car. If you are doing tune ups and changing manifolds, etc, you should be able to find your way around a V8 inboard with ease.

I have always worked on my own cars and boats. I have never had any problem that I was not able to overcome as far as simple repairs or maintenance. Availability of information via internet forums etc only makes it easier.
Old     (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004       05-27-2008, 7:29 AM Reply   
Jesse, just jump into it. More basic than a car IMO. easy to access and pretty straightforward. have fun.
Old     (hal2814)      Join Date: Feb 2006       05-27-2008, 7:44 AM Reply   
I learned by reading the factory service manuals, asking a lot of questions over at iboats forums (do it in that order if you want decent responses from those guys), and checking out a few videos on youtube when I don't understand a certain concept (ex. engine timing). I also learned real early on that if the procedure calls for specialty tools, you'll spend at least 1.5 extra hours per specialty tool you try to get by without. As long as you have the tools and the manual, boat work is just as easy as automotive work.

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