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Old     (aryder)      Join Date: Apr 2012       05-18-2015, 11:48 AM Reply   
Evidently, I suck at pulling new riders out of the water.

What are some tips that you guys might be able to share so I can get the newbies out of the water more quickly? I've almost always just pulled guys out of the water that are seasoned riders so I'm not well versed in pulling people out gently.
Old     (jarrod)      Join Date: May 2003       05-18-2015, 12:46 PM Reply   
Super short line. Tie it off at about 45-50 feet. It's less strenuous for the rider and you'll be able to see what's going on better.
Old     (TomH)      Join Date: Jan 2014       05-18-2015, 1:13 PM Reply   
Just nice and steady on the start. Hold the throttle lower if you tend to hammer it. Try not to overshoot the speed if you can - as one, it's terrifying for the newb, and two when you back off the throttle you'll likely cause them to overcompensate and they'll slide out the back. Like Jarrod said, a shorter line is better as well.
Old     (RideClaytorVT)      Join Date: Oct 2010       05-18-2015, 1:55 PM Reply   
I like to do a couple things when I am teaching new riders. I'm actually 29/29 for getting new riders up! These are the three things I teach/show/tell the rider to do.

1). Knees Bent
2). Arms Straight
3). Toes pointed (towards the boat)

I then like to pull the rope in (physically pulling the rider towards the boat) while the boat is in neutral and the rider is sitting in the water. I use the swim platform (which the rider places the middle of their board on the end 'edge of the platform' horizontally) and me gently pulling the rope to give them an idea of how rising out of the water should feel. I also like to tell new riders that the boat should pull you up onto your feet, there is no need to lean back.

If you have a fairly large rider and encounter difficulty, I've actually taught larger beginner riders how to deep water start. Some find it easier to get up that way.

Generally, a gradual pull will get any rider out of the water. The little guys (50-80lb riders) will pop up right away.

Hope some of this information helps! Didn't mean to go on and on : )
Old     (aryder)      Join Date: Apr 2012       05-18-2015, 2:03 PM Reply   
That's great info guys. I've so far been telling them not to stand up too quickly, push toes down (to plane out the board) and not to turn the board too quickly. I think my starts are just a little inconsistent and i'm throwing them off.

I'll have to try pulling the rope in more and try holding the hammer lower, as well as more gradual pulls.
Old     (biggator)      Join Date: Jul 2010       05-18-2015, 3:03 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by RideClaytorVT View Post
Generally, a gradual pull will get any rider out of the water. The little guys (50-80lb riders) will pop up right away.
THIS!!! Pull them up slowly unless they're big and heavy..
Old     (aryder)      Join Date: Apr 2012       05-18-2015, 3:21 PM Reply   
I may be reaching now, but how long of a second count do you take to get to speed?
Old     (tampawake)      Join Date: Mar 2008       05-18-2015, 3:30 PM Reply   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTnYRdiCqGo
Old     (liquidmx)      Join Date: Jun 2005       05-18-2015, 4:43 PM Reply   
I agree with J-Rod. Shortening the line length pulls them up more than a standard length...making it easier. Other obvious ones: Pull them at a slower overall speed, slowly bring the line tight and try different accelerations. Some beginners need a really slow pull, others seem to respond better to a faster pull.
Old     (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       05-18-2015, 5:01 PM Reply   
Tell them to "stay in a ball", that is heels to their butt, arms around their knees with toes pointed slightly toward the boat. Tell them to stay this way until they & the board are on top of the water. "Standing up" should be the very, very last thing they do. However, just about [U]everyone[U] that's a first-timer will start to straighten their legs immediately which makes getting up significantly harder (it just seems to be a natural, but unhelpful, tendency).
Old     (Orange)      Join Date: Jun 2012       05-18-2015, 6:56 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by aryder View Post
I may be reaching now, but how long of a second count do you take to get to speed?
I assume you mean time to get full throttle, not to speed...

That's tough to answer as the difference between a fast and slow start is probably measured in fractions of seconds. It's hard to describe how fast I do a throttle push... maybe like the amount of time it takes so say "one Mississippi"? Or the time it takes to take an exaggerated full inhale of breath (like if the doctor asks you to take a deep breath)?

The really important part is to be smooth and consistent. I do slow my throttle push down a little for youngsters and newbies. Better riders will adjust to almost anything you do, but even they will find predictable and consistent a benefit.

The tip earlier about simulating a start with the wakeboard braced against the swim step is a good one. I frequently also do a similar simulation without the wakeboard with them sitting on the floor of the boat.

I also tell my beginners to have their arms straight with their elbows touching the insides of their knees and to keep them touching their knees until the boat pulls them up. If their elbows stay at their knees, they avoid standing up too early or trying to pull themselves up by pulling their hands to their chest - both common mistakes.
Old     (whiteflashwatersports1)      Join Date: Dec 2012       05-19-2015, 8:28 AM Reply   
STAY IN THE BALL!!!! Keep your arms straight!!! If they do this and you pull them up nice and smoothly they will "pop" up every time.
Old     (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004       05-19-2015, 9:05 AM Reply   
skiers like a harder pull, so if they have a ski background consider that.

OTT, it takes about 10 seconds to get newbs up to speed.
Old     (dukeno1)      Join Date: May 2006       05-19-2015, 10:54 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orange View Post
I assume you mean time to get full throttle, not to speed...

That's tough to answer as the difference between a fast and slow start is probably measured in fractions of seconds. It's hard to describe how fast I do a throttle push... maybe like the amount of time it takes so say "one Mississippi"? Or the time it takes to take an exaggerated full inhale of breath (like if the doctor asks you to take a deep breath)?

The really important part is to be smooth and consistent. I do slow my throttle push down a little for youngsters and newbies. Better riders will adjust to almost anything you do, but even they will find predictable and consistent a benefit.

The tip earlier about simulating a start with the wakeboard braced against the swim step is a good one. I frequently also do a similar simulation without the wakeboard with them sitting on the floor of the boat.

I also tell my beginners to have their arms straight with their elbows touching the insides of their knees and to keep them touching their knees until the boat pulls them up. If their elbows stay at their knees, they avoid standing up too early or trying to pull themselves up by pulling their hands to their chest - both common mistakes.


Money!
Old     (razorjaw)      Join Date: Jan 2003       05-19-2015, 4:28 PM Reply   
Quick tip for the uncoordinated kid - don't say "point the toes", say "toes up" and show them. So many new riders I've met who think they have to point their toes DOWN and wonder why they keep going over the front!
Old     (biggator)      Join Date: Jul 2010       05-20-2015, 7:43 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by razorjaw View Post
Quick tip for the uncoordinated kid - don't say "point the toes", say "toes up" and show them. So many new riders I've met who think they have to point their toes DOWN and wonder why they keep going over the front!
I'm going to disagree with this one.. I've tried both - and saying 'toes up' often makes people pull their toes up when waiting for the pull.. it makes the board tilt back toward them and bury them when they start moving forward.

I go with 'point the toes'.. and tell them to let the board come up under their butt.
Old     (allzway)      Join Date: Feb 2014       05-20-2015, 10:04 AM Reply   
Knees bent - arms straight is what we preach over and over. It seems most beginners want to get the rope to close to their chest and have difficultly balancing doing this.

Also.. I have seen drivers try to jerk people out of the water and it just isn't necessary for a wakeboard or wakesurf board.

I slowly add throttle as the rider starts to surface.
Old     (denverd1)      Join Date: May 2004       05-20-2015, 10:38 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by biggator View Post
I'm going to disagree with this one.. I've tried both - and saying 'toes up' often makes people pull their toes up when waiting for the pull.. it makes the board tilt back toward them and bury them when they start moving forward.

I go with 'point the toes'.. and tell them to let the board come up under their butt.
board to butt is a phrase we use a lot
Old     (razorjaw)      Join Date: Jan 2003       05-20-2015, 4:24 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by biggator View Post
I'm going to disagree with this one.. I've tried both - and saying 'toes up' often makes people pull their toes up when waiting for the pull.. it makes the board tilt back toward them and bury them when they start moving forward.

I go with 'point the toes'.. and tell them to let the board come up under their butt.
Agree to disagree - as I said - for the uncoordinated kid I get many riders who think they have to point their toes (like a ballerina). I cannot tell you how many people I've gotten up by changing that one point alone - and I'm not suggesting it doesn't come with any other instruction.
Old     (aryder)      Join Date: Apr 2012       05-22-2015, 9:41 AM Reply   
Just wanted to follow up. Got my new rider out last night and used the tips of (1) shortening the rope to 55' (2) slow pulling (3) telling him over and over and over to stay into a ball and (4) starting him off at about the 2 o'clock position (instead of directly behind the boat), so when he started coming up he had a bit of lateral direction helping him.

Took about 5 tries, but he got up this time. Thanks guys!
Old     (JoLo_Si)      Join Date: Oct 2011       05-26-2015, 11:24 AM Reply   
I know you already got him up but for others. My new go-to for new riders is Shawn Murray's Wake MD App. One of the free vids is teaching how to get up. It is the easiest way to explain it from the best coach and obviously has video built in so they can see how it is supposed to look when they are trying to stay in a ball till their pulled up, ect. Plus, like I said, this one is free and mobile.

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