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Old    Ross (CTXxRoss)      Join Date: Apr 2013       06-24-2013, 9:11 AM Reply   
Ok y'all I'm looking for my first wake surf board. What's a size range I need to be looking for? I know nothing about this and want to make sure I get a board that's gonna keep me afloat.
Old    Nick Wiersema (Chaos)      Join Date: Apr 2010       06-24-2013, 10:22 AM Reply   
Ross, you are in that size range that most board will float you. Boards are sold by length, but two boards of the same length can be quite different in terms of displacement and float. Stay away from smaller skim-style board, anything less than 52". For surf-style boards consider 4'8" and above. Notice, that skim style board are sold in total length as inches (in the US, i.e. 48" or 51"), where as surf-style board are typically sold in feet and inches, i.e. 4'8" or 4'11" or 5'4".

If you would like some specific models and brands to look at just hit me back. Happy hunting.

Nick
Old    rzap (zap)      Join Date: Jan 2009       06-24-2013, 11:04 AM Reply   
Boat and ballast info would help us help you, at 200 lbs, ballast is importaint


Basic (inexpensive, indestructable and boring)
Hyperlite landlock
O'Brien Alias 5.0

Mid price ( indestructable and fun)
Inland sufer Blue lake
Inland surfer Mucas

Custom/Performance (expensive, lots of fun, fragile)

Shred stixx pirhana or custom
Custom soulcraft

If you are learning, and want a tough but fun surfstyle board that will let you progress, you can't beat the mucas for the price.
Old    Art (rallyart)      Join Date: Nov 2006       06-24-2013, 11:37 AM Reply   
When you are learning you need a bigger board. That helps you stay behind the boat and you gain more experience so you get better, and it is easier. If you have a choice, I would recommend getting a bigger board that works now for you rather than one suitable for you as you get to be an intermediate or would let youdo more tricks. With an easier to ride board you will enjoy the sport more and progress faster.
Getting the boat set up right for surfing will make the world much easier also. I had about 900# in mine and was getting a nice clean wake that my kids could ride easily but I always had more trouble staying with. I added another 400# sac and everything became better for everyone.
Go big. You do this for fun, so start off where it's easy.
Old    Ross (CTXxRoss)      Join Date: Apr 2013       06-24-2013, 12:24 PM Reply   
I've got a 2000 Moomba Kamberra with 4 550lb sacs so I have around 2200 pounds of Ballard I can move around however I need. I'm a pretty good rider and don't think I'll have any problems picking this up so I'd like kind of a mid level board
Old    Drew Wolfe (wolfe_drew)      Join Date: Mar 2010       06-24-2013, 1:46 PM Reply   
Ross, you can check out the Moomba Owner's forum for some tips on how to weight your boat for the best wave. In regards to a board, try and find some to try out before you buy and try to ride both a surf & skim style to see if you prefer one over the other. Regardless of what you start with, you'll catch the bug and soon own many boards of each type and will have a blast riding any of them.

If you just don't have availability to boards, time, patience and/or $$$, some good, intro boards are the LF Doum skim, the Phase 5 (P5) skims and the Inland Surfers both skim & surf. If you have the $$ and find that surf style is what you like, the IS Keenan model and/or Flyboy are great boards as is a Soulcraft. Those are just my preferences, but there really are a ton of great options out there.
Old    Ross (CTXxRoss)      Join Date: Apr 2013       06-24-2013, 2:08 PM Reply   
So what's the basic difference in skim vs surf?
Old    rzap (zap)      Join Date: Jan 2009       06-25-2013, 9:07 AM Reply   
The "Basic" difference between skim and surf style boards are:

Skims have small fins and the board has little to no rocker. They are typically slower down the line, but are loose so you can do spins and surface tricks.using the rocker and the rails

Surf style have large fins to create drive, they all have some form of rocker (some more than others), you carve your turns on a surfboard using the rocker and the rails.

With that said the boards seem to be gravitating to a hybid of both disciplines these days.
Old    Michael Haseck (SacSurfer)      Join Date: May 2012       06-25-2013, 9:13 AM Reply   
Ross,

Really have you even looked or read what the guys above stated? Skim style is a like an ocean skim board (think surface spins tricks, floaters etc), surf is going to be larger with fins for (airs, carves, snap turns)

I'm not sure if we can help you, here try one of the major online retailers
Old    Ross (CTXxRoss)      Join Date: Apr 2013       06-25-2013, 2:37 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacSurfer View Post
Ross,

Really have you even looked or read what the guys above stated? Skim style is a like an ocean skim board (think surface spins tricks, floaters etc), surf is going to be larger with fins for (airs, carves, snap turns)

I'm not sure if we can help you, here try one of the major online retailers
I asked a question so of course I read what they were saying...... I understood there was a difference in the way the boards rode and handled... What I was asking was the differences in tricks and the purpose of each board. I suppose I should of been more specific with my question. But what would the point of asking a question be if you didn't read the responses???
Old    rzap (zap)      Join Date: Jan 2009       06-25-2013, 3:37 PM Reply   
Ross,

What you need to decide is which style you prefer to learn skim or surf.. If you go on youtube and search Drew Danielo you will see great examples of skim style ridding. If you search Chase Hazen, you will see a great example of surf style.

Since you are new to surfing, and still unsure which style you want to ride, I suggest getting a larger (5'0) wakeboard brand board (Ronix or Hyperlight) as they are very inexpensive. The only downside is they don't perform that well and you will grow out of them skill wise in a hurry. This is OK, as once you get into it and you buy "Your Board", you will need a boat board for other riders and guests.

Now based on what you have told us about your weight and wake, my personal suggestion is an Inland Surfer Mucas, they are really priced well, they are alot of fun and the design will allow you to grow your skills, it will be two years before your better than the board.

One thing to remember 200lbs at home is 225 lbs in the water (wet life jacket), so error on the heavy side when researching the rider weights on the boards.

enjoy the sport!

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