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Old    John Gunnels (cragrat)      Join Date: Mar 2012       11-02-2012, 11:26 AM Reply   
So after thirty plus years of destroying my body in the world of hard core rock climbing, I discovered the incredible sport of Wakesurfing a little over a year ago. So many things about it appeal to me. The movement... the environment... the gear... and of course, the low impact nature of the activity.

Had a follow-up visit with my "Arthritis Doc" yesterday... and a total hip replacement is inevitable in the next couple of years. There is tons of data regarding the success and relative "ease" of this surgery these days, but nothing really out there regarding water sports. So.....

I was wondering if anyone in Wakeworld has had this procedure and how it has affected your surfing ability. Positive results? Negative results? Any and all opinions would be greatly appreciated.
Old    Dennis (dennish)      Join Date: May 2005       11-02-2012, 12:22 PM Reply   
Like you I am a candidate for replacement surgery. Mine would be both knees. They wanted to replace them when i was 35 but wouldn't because of my age then. I am 61 and still need them done. I have read a lot about people having hips replaced and returning to surf in the ocean which would bode well for you. I have never seen anyone return to surfing after a knee replacement. I keep looking.
Old    Sue (malibu)      Join Date: Sep 2004       11-03-2012, 8:19 AM Reply   
I don't know about a hip or knee replacement but I do have a total shoulder replacement. I had it done on 8/9/11 and I was wakesurfing in AZ with the Mike and Angie Viland, the last week of March of 2012! I don't have any of the pain in my right shoulder (replaced one), during or after wakesurfing. It was a game changer for me.
My surgeon is a wakesurfer too, so he understood when I talked to him before the surgery about how much I love this sport. He said as long as I didn't wakeboard anymore I would be fine. I did a lot of physical therapy and I did the home exercises that they gave me. It was totally worth it!
The hardest part of the whole deal was not being able to wakesurf for about 7 months but that trip to AZ and my first surf after surgery was so rewarding.
cragrat, I hope your hip replacement is as successful as my shoulder. I'm sure you will be amazed at how good it feels to not be in pain anymore.
Dennis, good luck with your knees too! I am always inspired when I see the pics of you surfing. I had a great time visiting with you at the Polar Bear.
Sue
Old    Frank Berg (Iceberg)      Join Date: Dec 2011       11-04-2012, 6:34 PM Reply   
The hardest part will be reboarding the boat!
Old     (bigcatpt)      Join Date: Aug 2007       11-07-2012, 11:26 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by cragrat View Post
So after thirty plus years of destroying my body in the world of hard core rock climbing, I discovered the incredible sport of Wakesurfing a little over a year ago. So many things about it appeal to me. The movement... the environment... the gear... and of course, the low impact nature of the activity.

Had a follow-up visit with my "Arthritis Doc" yesterday... and a total hip replacement is inevitable in the next couple of years. There is tons of data regarding the success and relative "ease" of this surgery these days, but nothing really out there regarding water sports. So.....

I was wondering if anyone in Wakeworld has had this procedure and how it has affected your surfing ability. Positive results? Negative results? Any and all opinions would be greatly appreciated.
John
I am a physical therapist and get asked this kind of question all the time. "Can I do__________ after I have __________ procedure done. Lots of different things go in the blanks.

In your case... Can I wakesurf following THR. My answers.... absolutely!!!!

Now here is the disclaimer. Make sure you use a surgeon that does an anterior approach THR and not a posterior or posterior/lateral approach! Read this and it will all make sense. http://eastcoastortho.com/technology/anterior-hip.php

The main difference between the two approaches is how much muscle has to be cut or detached to perform the procedure. In the anterior approach, no muscle is detached or cut open. In the posterior/lateral approach several muscles are cut apart or detached. When you cut or detach those muscles and then put them back together it takes a long time to get them working again. Furthermore, those muscles are no longer working well to prevent the new hip from dislocating and there is a huge risk for dislocation. With the posterior/lateral approach you have to follow strict precautions for a long time (6+ months) after the surgery. Here is some more info about those precautions after a posterior lateral approach.

Hip precautions are recommendations that orthopedic surgeons discuss with patients before and after surgery. These only apply to patients who have a hip replacement through a posterior approach. These recommendations are to prevent patients from dislocating their new hip replacement which as I just mentioned is one of the most common complications that can occur after a hip replacement. The precautions start on the day of surgery when a pillow is placed between your legs for approximately the first 4-6 weeks whenever you are sitting or lying down. When you sleep, you have to sleep on your back with the pillow between your legs for the first 4- weeks. In addition you are told to follow a 90-90 rule which means donít bend your hips or knees beyond 90 degrees. You are also told not to cross your legs, turn your toes inward, or tie your shoes. You shouldn't sit on low chairs or couches. To assist with these precautions, you are also recommended to get an elevated toilet seat so that when you sit down on the toilet, you donít go beyond 90 degrees at the hip either when you sit or get up. If you have your hip replaced by an anterior approach as I described earlier, none of these precautions apply. The risk of dislocation is almost eliminated and you donít need that cumbersome pillow between your legs, you can sit or sleep in any comfortable position you like, you can cross your legs, tie your shoes, and you donít need an elevated toilet seat.


Bottom line.... Do an anterior approach, be very diligent with physical therapy after the surgery, and you will be back surfing in no time at all!

Good luck!
Old    John Gunnels (cragrat)      Join Date: Mar 2012       11-07-2012, 9:34 PM Reply   
Thanks for the insight and the great link, Bigcat. My wife is a Home Health RN... and I have several close friends that are PTs. Opinions are consistent... anterior is DEFINITELY the way to go. Hate to sound like a "baby"... but it's kinda scary. Not the surgery or rehab, but knowing that since I'm "only" 51 there's a good chance I will need a second procedure at somewhere between 65 and 70. Oh well... who would want to wakesurf at that age. Oops... guess that would be ME!
Old     (bigcatpt)      Join Date: Aug 2007       11-08-2012, 7:24 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by cragrat View Post
Thanks for the insight and the great link, Bigcat. My wife is a Home Health RN... and I have several close friends that are PTs. Opinions are consistent... anterior is DEFINITELY the way to go. Hate to sound like a "baby"... but it's kinda scary. Not the surgery or rehab, but knowing that since I'm "only" 51 there's a good chance I will need a second procedure at somewhere between 65 and 70. Oh well... who would want to wakesurf at that age. Oops... guess that would be ME!
Yes you bring up a good point. Hip replacements in young/active people are really only expected to last 10-15 years. And most people only have enough good bone quality to do one revision in their lifetime. So you are looking at those 2 replacements lasting you until you are 71-81 years old. This is the reason they try to get everyone to wait until they are at least 60 and preferably 65 before doing a total hip replacement. Hips last longer in older people because they have more sedentary lifestyles. If you had your first at 65 and it lasted 15 years and your second at 80 then it should last til you are 95. Chances are that hip would outlast you. But since you are young you need to take care of it properly. Get the best surgeon you can find, do your PT 100%, stay physically fit and strong, keep your weight down, and hope you have good bone quality!
Old    Chris Kinsey Sr. (Elite95)      Join Date: Feb 2011       11-08-2012, 11:15 AM Reply   
Also, check with your doctor about a hip resurfacing in leu of a total hip replacement. Much less bone is removed and it is designed for a younger more active patient. I have a friend who had a hip resurfacing in his late 40's. Here is more information
http://www.hipresurfacingsite.com/
Old    John Gunnels (cragrat)      Join Date: Mar 2012       11-08-2012, 10:03 PM Reply   
Is that what is referred to as a "Birmingham Cap"?
Old    John Gunnels (cragrat)      Join Date: Mar 2012       07-19-2013, 12:26 PM Reply   
Holy 20 years younger.

Completed a total hip replacement 6 weeks ago. Amazing. Life altering. Why didn't I do it sooner?!? No, wait... I'm glad I waited. Technology has advanced so much. Anterior approach, no screws or adhesive in the joint, and no staples in the incision. Absolutely ZERO pain since I woke up from the surgery. Some folks just don't understand... there's a distinct difference between "pain" and "soreness".

After 6 weeks of therapy, Doc released me to do "anything I want". Hike, bike, climb... and SURF! Headed to the lake this weekend to shred... pics to follow!
Attached Images
 
Old    Douglas Bachtel (guido8000)      Join Date: Jun 2013       07-31-2013, 7:49 PM Reply   
Hey John, I just joined this forum and this is actually my first post. But I do know something about the topic. I have had both hips done, a full replacement about 7 years ago and a hip resurfacing about 4. I would advise the resurfacing over total hip. I see you have already done a full hip but I can tell you the pros and cons. Full hip is a quicker less invasive and quicker recovery. The resurfacing feels better after about six months.

I too have destroyed my body and continue to do so. I still snow ski, anything, everything and spend lots of time in the steeps, bumps and powder when ever I get the chance. I ride moto when I am not skiing, mtn bike, slalom ski, wake board, racquet ball, you name it. I avoid getting air in whatever it is I am doing but I feel better now than I did in my 40's. My son turned us on to wakesurfing last fall and I just bought my first V-drive that I will be setting up this next month. I like the wakesurfing due to the low impact aspect of it. Slalom skiing iand wake boarding are fine on my hips but my neck and shoulders suffer.

My advise is do your therapy, do it some more, and keep on doing it. The only time my hips bother me is when I am not moving. Standing in one place is the hardest thing for me. Good luck and good surfing..


Quote:
Originally Posted by cragrat View Post
Holy 20 years younger.

Completed a total hip replacement 6 weeks ago. Amazing. Life altering. Why didn't I do it sooner?!? No, wait... I'm glad I waited. Technology has advanced so much. Anterior approach, no screws or adhesive in the joint, and no staples in the incision. Absolutely ZERO pain since I woke up from the surgery. Some folks just don't understand... there's a distinct difference between "pain" and "soreness".

After 6 weeks of therapy, Doc released me to do "anything I want". Hike, bike, climb... and SURF! Headed to the lake this weekend to shred... pics to follow!
Old     (Bluewater)      Join Date: Oct 2013       10-06-2013, 8:36 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by malibu View Post
I don't know about a hip or knee replacement but I do have a total shoulder replacement. I had it done on 8/9/11 and I was wakesurfing in AZ with the Mike and Angie Viland, the last week of March of 2012! I don't have any of the pain in my right shoulder (replaced one), during or after wakesurfing. It was a game changer for me.
My surgeon is a wakesurfer too, so he understood when I talked to him before the surgery about how much I love this sport. He said as long as I didn't wakeboard anymore I would be fine. I did a lot of physical therapy and I did the home exercises that they gave me. It was totally worth it!
The hardest part of the whole deal was not being able to wakesurf for about 7 months but that trip to AZ and my first surf after surgery was so rewarding.
cragrat, I hope your hip replacement is as successful as my shoulder. I'm sure you will be amazed at how good it feels to not be in pain anymore.
Dennis, good luck with your knees too! I am always inspired when I see the pics of you surfing. I had a great time visiting with you at the Polar Bear.
Sue
Hi Sue,
I'm really interested in your shoulder replacement. I'm a long term ocean surfer who hasn't been able to surf for a couple of years because of a very arthritic shoulder. I'm 51 and am in pretty good shape otherwise. Does your replaced shoulder function pretty similarly to your original shoulder? Derek
Old    Train (ttrigo)      Join Date: Dec 2004       10-06-2013, 10:36 AM Reply   
My ortho told me he has 2 patients with both hips replaced in their fifties, and both are back in the ocean surfing. They ride longboards, but still. I dont see how wakesurfing could be any kind of deterrent for a hip replacement patient. I am only 38, and have had both hips scoped in the last 3 years, due to labral tears caused by afemoral acetabular impingements. I dont wakeboard anymore, but i have zero worries about wakesurfing, and even riding cable sometime again. With that said, if i am put into 2 new hips at 45, my doc doesnt see a huge risk of me continuing the lifestyle i lead for at least 20 years before i would need to replace them.
I wish you luck. Its odd going to PT, and seeing other hip surgery patients in there, and i am like 30 years younger than all of them!
Old    Sue (malibu)      Join Date: Sep 2004       10-06-2013, 7:06 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluewater View Post
Hi Sue,
I'm really interested in your shoulder replacement. I'm a long term ocean surfer who hasn't been able to surf for a couple of years because of a very arthritic shoulder. I'm 51 and am in pretty good shape otherwise. Does your replaced shoulder function pretty similarly to your original shoulder? Derek
Derek,
My right shoulder was replaced two years ago at age 50 and it functions pretty much like the left one. I am left handed but I wore the right one out crashing on my mountain bike back in my 20's. It has a little less range of motion than the left but not much. I did a lot of physical therapy after my total shoulder replacement and that helped a lot. I used my iceman (the ice chest with cooling pad), day and night for about 2 weeks, whenever I was sitting or sleeping. It kept the swelling and pain down.
I wakesurf, bicycle and do some shooting sports with out any trouble.
My shoulder was pretty much bone on bone before the surgery without much cartilage left. I bet you will be back surfing after your replacement and so glad you had it done. The hardest part is waiting to go back to your sport but since you can't surf now you should do it so you can surf! I may want surfing lessons. When we go to the Oregon Coast I watch the surfers and it looks like so much fun but it's a whole different sport than behind the boat!

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