Articles
   
       
       
Pics/Video
   
       
       
Shop
Search
 
 
 
 
 
Home   Articles   Pics/Video   Gear   Wake 101   Events   Community   Forums   Classifieds   Contests   Shop   Search
WAKE WORLD HOME
Email Password
Go Back   WakeWorld > Non-Wakeboarding Discussion

Share 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-20-2012, 9:43 AM Reply   
My girlfriend has an extremely entry level road bike right now and has figured out she likes biking and is going to continue riding. We are signed up for the STP(Seattle to Portland) this summer. All her riding is going to be almost all training rides. We did 27 miles this last weekend and it is only going to go up from there. We will be riding every weekend for the most part. She is looking to spend between 1000-1400 bucks. We have found your typical aluminum bikes with 105 for as low as 1000, one Fuji Aluminum bike with Sram Rival(I would consider a slight upgrade from 105) for $1100, an aluminum bike with Ultegra for 1300 and a full carbon bike with 105 for $1400.

The basic question would be seeing how she is going to use the bike would you rather have an aluminum bike with ultegra or 105(cheaper) or a carbon bike with 105? I am leaning towards the Carbon bike because of the better ride and less wear and tear and the body. I don't think the better components will benefit her as much as the carbon frame. Thoughts?
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       02-20-2012, 9:59 AM Reply   
Brett,

I'd go with Carbon. You can always upgrade components later if you want. If you want her to like long rides go with comfort. I've owned aluminum doing 3-4 hour rides and then went to carbon. It was like night & day better on carbon. I used to chuckle at cycle enthusiasts' discussion of frame material. Not anymore!
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-20-2012, 10:10 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottog1979 View Post
Brett,

I'd go with Carbon. You can always upgrade components later if you want. If you want her to like long rides go with comfort. I've owned aluminum doing 3-4 hour rides and then went to carbon. It was like night & day better on carbon. I used to chuckle at cycle enthusiasts' discussion of frame material. Not anymore!
I am really starting to lean that way. About 2 years ago I went from an aluminum scott to a cheapish Steel Soma to now a Jamis with Reynolds 853 and carbon seat tube, top tube and seat stays and I already love the better quality frame with good quality steel and carbon.
Old    Sean M (magic)      Join Date: Mar 2002       02-20-2012, 10:22 AM Reply   
Short answers...
Kit is king
Carbon rides sooooooooooo many nice ( have Ti, Carbon, Steel and Al bikes, have done many 100+ mile rides on all of them)
S105 I find to be more female friendly over SRAM. I personally dig on SRAM, but my wife finds Shimano easier to shift.
Compact crank up front
Good bar tape
Saddle that fits
ride lots
Old    Sean M (magic)      Join Date: Mar 2002       02-20-2012, 10:53 AM Reply   
Edit for above FIT is king.... no idea why I typo'd Kit for Fit...
Old    Darren Yearsley (ralph)      Join Date: Apr 2002       02-20-2012, 12:11 PM Reply   
IMO hi end alloy is better than low end carbon. You can soften up a stiff bike with the right seat post and cockpit setup but a floppy carbon bike you can't fix.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-20-2012, 12:50 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph View Post
IMO hi end alloy is better than low end carbon. You can soften up a stiff bike with the right seat post and cockpit setup but a floppy carbon bike you can't fix.
I guess I have no idea where the carbon Schwinn ranks in the world of carbon. Doing some quick google searches I have found that Schwinn has been building their N'Litened Black Label carbon since 06 or 07. I believe they are built in China. I saw the bike at Performance bike and talking with the guy there who may or may not be full of ****e he said Schwinn has been building carbon bikes for a number of other bike companies but hasn't done much to push their own name in the carbon or high end world. He didn't name any names on who they may be building for. Not sure if it is just because the schwinn name isn't what it use to be and they basically sell really cheap box store bikes mostly or for some other reason. I for one don't care about brand name at all. I could care less and wont' pay the extra money for a bike to have a Cannondale, Trek or Specialized sticker on the side vs soemthing else. Hell, I would be just fine buying a Chi-done carbon bike. Since my girlfriend isn't racing, or anythign close for that matter, I am not sure what little bit of extra flex there may be in cheaper carbon will affect her since she isn't absolutely pounding on the pedals or have the tourque to really flex the bike. Besides fit I am just hoping she finds the bike that will be the most comfortable for long distance rides.

Do you think "floppy" carbon will really be noticable to a beginner rider who isn't riding super hard. She probably averages 15 mph or so on flat ground with no tail or head wind.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-20-2012, 12:52 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottog1979 View Post
Brett,

I'd go with Carbon. You can always upgrade components later if you want. If you want her to like long rides go with comfort. I've owned aluminum doing 3-4 hour rides and then went to carbon. It was like night & day better on carbon. I used to chuckle at cycle enthusiasts' discussion of frame material. Not anymore!
What carbon bike do you ride now? A high end bike or something more middle of the road?
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       02-20-2012, 1:18 PM Reply   
I have a tri-bike, a 10-year old Kestrel Airfoil. It was a $4,000+/- bike new. I bought it used when it was about 5 years old for $1,300. The specific bike I rode prior was an aluminum Cannondale CAAD 7. The Cannondale was actually lighter than the Kestrel by a couple of pounds, but just not fun to ride for more than a couple of hours.

I don't profess to be a bike guru at all (I'm a runner). But, I will tell you that the difference between aluminum & carbon was noticeable. (That's the best pic I could find of the Cannondale.)
Attached Images
  
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       02-20-2012, 4:20 PM Reply   
In a blind test between two bikes that fit, a bigger difference in comfort will result from more compliant tires than frame material. IMHO and all that.
Old    Darren Yearsley (ralph)      Join Date: Apr 2002       02-21-2012, 12:04 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by polarbill View Post
I guess I have no idea where the carbon Schwinn ranks in the world of carbon. ..... Do you think "floppy" carbon will really be noticable to a beginner rider who isn't riding super hard. She probably averages 15 mph or so on flat ground with no tail or head wind.
I am not familiar with Schwinn bikes either, but my point was about class of bike rather than a specific manf vs another. Ie I would take a high end alloy Giant with ultegra rather than low end giant carbon with 105. (I ride a top end carbon giant currently)

On reflection, no she won't tell the difference in frame performance until she is a little more advanced, but she might tell the difference between good gearing and entry level gearing. And yes good tires make a massive difference to ride quality and rolling resistance.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-21-2012, 8:12 AM Reply   
Thanks guys. There is also the possibility of steel as well. If I could find a higher end steel bike with 105 or rival for less the 1500 I would also throw that into the ring.

So what tires does everybody think are good for ride quality and rolling resistance? Are tires that are good in those characteristics going to pick up stuff easy(flats)? My older Soma steel bike had 21mm gatorskins and my current bike has 2.3mm gatorskins. I have nothing to compare for ride quality although I think I have only had 1 flat in ~1500 miles of the gatorskins which I thought was pretty good. When I bought my last Jamis carbon/steel bike the guy I bought it from told me he really likes a different Continental tire then the gatorskins but they looked similar. He liked them a lot more then gatorskins.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-21-2012, 9:00 AM Reply   
These are the tires the guy really liked.
http://www.biketiresdirect.com/produ...nd-prix-4000-s
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       02-21-2012, 9:04 AM Reply   
So (Darren & Shawndog) I have a good question. Aren't compliant tires (soft ride) and rolling resistance on the opposite sides of the tire spectrum? Just curious as I have never contemplated this issue with regard to tires.
Old    Mik (norcalrider)      Join Date: Jun 2002       02-21-2012, 9:22 AM Reply   
I had a horrible experience with continental tires last season and won't be buying any soon. They kept splitting or bulging on me.

You should hit up Craigslist. I bought my ex a S-Works with campy components for under $1500 from a team rider. Thing was immaculate.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-21-2012, 9:41 AM Reply   
What are your guys' thoughts on bikesdirect.com? I see they have some nice motobecane titianium frames and can get this bike for 1500 or sub rival for an extra $100. The components all the way through look pretty solid including the wheelset, brakes, crank, seatpost, stem and handlebars which a lot of the 1000-1500 dollar bikes skimp on .

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...mp_ti_apex.htm
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-21-2012, 9:48 AM Reply   
Here is another bike we would possibly consider. I like Jamis and this frame has carbon stays and fork. 105 shifters and derailleurs but a cheaper FSA crank, cheaper wheelset and tektro brakes. THat being said if the frame is good I/she can live with the brakes and crank being not that great. Since she isn't racing stopping isnt' a huge deal for her and she has a set of Ksyrium Equippe wheels anyways that will be put on the bike.
http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebik...race_spec.html
Old    Darren Yearsley (ralph)      Join Date: Apr 2002       02-21-2012, 10:50 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottog1979 View Post
So (Darren & Shawndog) I have a good question. Aren't compliant tires (soft ride) and rolling resistance on the opposite sides of the tire spectrum? Just curious as I have never contemplated this issue with regard to tires.
Not in my experience no, good tires and better in both regards. But to be fair I have pretty much always run conti's and have not experimented much after I found what worked for me. I think if you get a tire with low rolling resistance you can run a lower pressure which gives better ride quality if you want it. I am pretty much race focused and the ISP on my bike gives a pretty good ride for a race bike so I am not overly worried about comfort.

My choice in tires Conti 4000S with cheap tubes @ 90-100PSI for training and Conti super sonic tubes and tires @ 105-110 psi for racing.
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       02-21-2012, 3:21 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ottog1979 View Post
So (Darren & Shawndog) I have a good question. Aren't compliant tires (soft ride) and rolling resistance on the opposite sides of the tire spectrum? Just curious as I have never contemplated this issue with regard to tires.
Three big factors in tires: comfort, rolling resistance, and resistance to flats. Flat resistance comes at the expense of the other two. My race tires (before I got too fat and lazy) were vittoria corsa evos. Very very compliant and comfortable tire and also extremely fast (deformation actually makes the tire faster, counterintuitively enough). But thin enough that if you ever skid one it's absolutely done for.

Gatorskins... man, those suckers won't flat, but the ride is pretty terrible too. As a middle ground, by going to a slightly bigger tire, say a 25 or 27, then extra air allows you to run a slightly lower pressure and provides a lot more cushion. It's all relative. I run 105 lbs on 23s and could get away with 90 or so on a 25. The big fat 25s are going to roll a bit slower though.

Nowadays I'm not doing 60 or 80 mile days, so comfort for a few hours isn't a big issue. I'll chose flat resistance over comfort any day on a 30-35 mile ride.

If you really want to geek out on it, the guys over at biketechreview.com have put together rolling resistance charts for years.
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       02-21-2012, 3:23 PM Reply   
^ Damn! Perfect, thanks.
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       02-21-2012, 3:24 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by polarbill View Post
What are your guys' thoughts on bikesdirect.com? I see they have some nice motobecane titianium frames and can get this bike for 1500 or sub rival for an extra $100. The components all the way through look pretty solid including the wheelset, brakes, crank, seatpost, stem and handlebars which a lot of the 1000-1500 dollar bikes skimp on .

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...mp_ti_apex.htm
the bicycle equivalent of buying an epic. don't expect much dealer support, but the bang for the buck is there if the bike does what you are looking for.

A partner of mine has bought a couple of low end mtbs from bikesdirect and has been happy with them. All the better if you are a competent wrench and can put it together out of the box.
Old    Jim Fergus (jfergus7)      Join Date: Jul 2011       02-22-2012, 12:02 AM Reply   
I have worked in bike shops for over 15 years now and I can tell you regardless of where you purchase her bike from the most important thing will be fit. The best bike in the world will be terrible for her if she isn't fitted to it properly. I would strongly suggest that you look at purchasing through a retailer that has a good fitter on staff. I know you can find decent deals online but you are purchasing blind that way. And what you will find is that after your purchase and a $150+ for a good fitting not to mention any parts changes that may need to be made the cost savings will be minimal if any. Not to mention that through a local retailer you should get some decent support for example flat replacement, gear and brake adjustments, follow up checkup as well as usually a good discount on accessories. Unless you now how to adjust your gears and brakes plan on taking it into a shop 3-5 times in the first year while those cables stretch out and at $20 per visit or so that is a good amount of money that will eliminate any good deal you found online.

As for the options you were comparing I would go with a carbon with slightly lower components over the aluminum frame. In the long run she will be much happier and you can always upgrade components down the road.
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       02-22-2012, 10:48 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfergus7 View Post
I have worked in bike shops for over 15 years now and I can tell you regardless of where you purchase her bike from the most important thing will be fit. The best bike in the world will be terrible for her if she isn't fitted to it properly. I would strongly suggest that you look at purchasing through a retailer that has a good fitter on staff. I know you can find decent deals online but you are purchasing blind that way. And what you will find is that after your purchase and a $150+ for a good fitting not to mention any parts changes that may need to be made the cost savings will be minimal if any. Not to mention that through a local retailer you should get some decent support for example flat replacement, gear and brake adjustments, follow up checkup as well as usually a good discount on accessories. Unless you now how to adjust your gears and brakes plan on taking it into a shop 3-5 times in the first year while those cables stretch out and at $20 per visit or so that is a good amount of money that will eliminate any good deal you found online.

As for the options you were comparing I would go with a carbon with slightly lower components over the aluminum frame. In the long run she will be much happier and you can always upgrade components down the road.
GREAT advice.

If you know the exact frame geometry that works, etc, and are a wrench, but don't have access to bro deals, bikes direct CAN be great. For instance, it can almost be worth it sometimes to buy a bike from them just for the grouppo, strip it to the frame and resell the frame and fork.

But once you factor in labor for assembly, part switching for fit (which is frequently free) and the intangible of developing a relationship, the cost savings may be illusory.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-22-2012, 11:30 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfergus7 View Post
I have worked in bike shops for over 15 years now and I can tell you regardless of where you purchase her bike from the most important thing will be fit. The best bike in the world will be terrible for her if she isn't fitted to it properly. I would strongly suggest that you look at purchasing through a retailer that has a good fitter on staff. I know you can find decent deals online but you are purchasing blind that way. And what you will find is that after your purchase and a $150+ for a good fitting not to mention any parts changes that may need to be made the cost savings will be minimal if any. Not to mention that through a local retailer you should get some decent support for example flat replacement, gear and brake adjustments, follow up checkup as well as usually a good discount on accessories. Unless you now how to adjust your gears and brakes plan on taking it into a shop 3-5 times in the first year while those cables stretch out and at $20 per visit or so that is a good amount of money that will eliminate any good deal you found online.

As for the options you were comparing I would go with a carbon with slightly lower components over the aluminum frame. In the long run she will be much happier and you can always upgrade components down the road.
Thanks Jim, that makes a lot of sense and would be the main advantage of buying from a local LBS.

On the other hand It looks like bikesdirect now assembles the biek 90% of the way. There isn't much assembly. You don't have to mount the levers, run the cables or chace/face the BB. Not sure if this is how it has always been done?I am completely fine with setting up and adjusting the derailleurs myself.

As far as fit what are the most important measurements? Right now my girlfriend rides a 54 Raleigh that has a 54.5cm top tube and 51cm or so seat tube. For example the titanium Motobecane in a 51cm(not sure why they measure the bike from the seat tube instead of the top tube, does this have to do with a compact geomtry vs standard?) that has a 54cm effective top tube and 51cm seat tube so in essence they are very similar in size. Would adjusting the seat and playing with the stem height, angle and length be the only adjustments?
Old    Sean M (magic)      Join Date: Mar 2002       02-22-2012, 1:04 PM Reply   
Will chime back in:
-- I'd say current carbon frames are pretty good, I'd personally do a current carbon frame over most Al frames these days.
-- Tire size is an interesting topic. Like Ralph I'm partial to Conti. I run 25mm 4000s, GP4 Seasons and Gatorskins depending on the bike. the 25mm rolls and ride very nice. I'm 6'2" and 185lbs at racing weight. so 23mm are a bit narrow for me. I've run a 23 front and 25mm rear, like that combo on road bikes. I'd run GP4 Seasons for a great all around tire.
-- Fit is king
-- Compact geo frames have an effective top tube, you go with that. Stem and seat position should be for fine tuning fit, not to fix a poorly fitting frame.
-- I've bought four bikes without ever riding the them first. Still have 3 of the 4 (the one that is gone I destroyed the frame). I'd not be afraid to but online or have a shop order a frame (I've done both). So many of the current frames across brands are close in size and fit these days. Unless the rider has long torso or really long legs, you can find the style that suits and then shop the various brands models that match.

Ti frames ride really nice, they have a spring to them. Carbon feels dead in comparison, but carbon does soak up road buzz very nicely. I have an older Litespeed Tri frame that I'll never let go. I've replaced the fame with a modern current one and converted the Litespeed to a fixie and Ti makes for a great fixie.

I'll attach a random bike pick. Just picked up a Seasucker bike rack, test fitting it with my track bike and Tri bike in training kit.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by magic; 02-22-2012 at 1:06 PM.
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       02-22-2012, 1:13 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by polarbill View Post
Thanks Jim, that makes a lot of sense and would be the main advantage of buying from a local LBS.

On the other hand It looks like bikesdirect now assembles the biek 90% of the way. There isn't much assembly. You don't have to mount the levers, run the cables or chace/face the BB. Not sure if this is how it has always been done?I am completely fine with setting up and adjusting the derailleurs myself.

As far as fit what are the most important measurements? Right now my girlfriend rides a 54 Raleigh that has a 54.5cm top tube and 51cm or so seat tube. For example the titanium Motobecane in a 51cm(not sure why they measure the bike from the seat tube instead of the top tube, does this have to do with a compact geomtry vs standard?) that has a 54cm effective top tube and 51cm seat tube so in essence they are very similar in size. Would adjusting the seat and playing with the stem height, angle and length be the only adjustments?
That's how factory bikes have come boxed since at least 1990 (the first year I worked at a bike shop). You will need to adjust brakes, true the wheels, adjust the derailleurs, install pedals, adjust stem height and tighten everything up. By no means rocket science. For a "pro" build (i.e. how a shop rat would build his own bike) I would often cut down excess brake and derailleur housing, remove the "dork ring" on the inside of the cassette, remove reflectors, etc. Used to be customary to chase and face the BB on a pro-build, along with facing the headtube, but that's kinda old school these days.

the length of the tubes are only one part of it. You also need to consider the angles, because those define how the tubes relate to one another. In these days of aheadset (does anyone even call non-quill stem setups that anymore?) stems, headtube length plays a very big role in comfort because a longer head tube will bring the bars up relative to the saddle. "Comfort" bikes tend to have a longer headtube, while race frames will have a shorter headtube (and consequently more seat to bar drop).

You can adjust saddle setback to a degree by switching seatposts (compare a zero setback tomson style post with a more tradition setback post). That changes the effective seat tube angle, though... Different bars with shallower drops are common for women. It's been a while, but I recall at least one variety of shimano sti levers was also adjustable for womens' smaller hands and reach.

I also have a strong preference for the tilt of my bars and the position of the levers relative to that tilt, so for me personally, if the bars are already wrapped, chances are I'd be re-wrapping them after I make my adjustments.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-29-2012, 12:02 PM Reply   
What do you guys think about this bike. Seems like a smoking deal for a Aluminum frame with carbon fork and seat stays with good components. Not sure there is a single bad component on the biek and that includes the wheelset and brakes which are usually crappy as hell on bikes in this range. A 105 setup trek or specialized, with crappy wheels, no name brakes and crappy seatpost, stem and bars is probably a couple hundred more. The frame also looks to have a nice natural rise to the top tube so it should be a nice comfortable bike for centuries.

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...0_20000_400306

Frame: Aluminum frame with carbon stays
Fork: Carbon with alloiy steerer
Levers: Ultegra
RD: Ultegra
FD: 105
cranks: mid level FSA energy(should be as good as 105 or rival)
brakes: FSA gossamer(probably abou tthe same as 105 or rival)
Cassette:Sram(looks like one of their lower level cassettes but I am sure wtill fine), has a 26 tooth cog so should be ok up hills since she will be going from a triple
Stem: carbon FSA
seatpost: Carbon FSA
Bars: mid level FSA
Wheelset:Mavic Aksium(better then most bikes in this range)
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-29-2012, 12:07 PM Reply   
They also have this one for a grand. Same frame and fork but with mostly 105. Everything is a slight step below but not full out crappy.
http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...0_20000_400306
Old    alan plotz (alanp)      Join Date: Apr 2001       02-29-2012, 1:01 PM Reply   
see if your state has a cycling forum on google groups. VA has one and ppl sell bikes on there all the time dirt cheap. for 1300-1500 bux you should be able to get a bike outfitted w dura ace, albeit used. thats the route i would go. also you can just post to the forum(wtb) and you'll probably get a ton of responses. ive bought 3 bikes on thru that forum for myself and friends.
Old    alan plotz (alanp)      Join Date: Apr 2001       02-29-2012, 1:02 PM Reply   
this showed up today. may be a little out of your price range but i bet it could be had for 1500

Road Bike - Cannondale CAAD 9 - 2010 - Size 50cm - $1800
White frame with red writting and some silver details
Full carbon forlk
All Dura Ace7800/7900 new components (DA 7900 deuraileurs)
53/39 crankset 170mm crankarm BB30 technology bottom bracket Carbon
Handlebar Easton EC90
Wheels Roval Classique Pave SL E5- 10sp w/ MichelinPro3 (new tires)
Bike was used only about 20 times
Bike is brand new (only used a few times)
Impecable condition: no scratches, no crashes!!!
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-29-2012, 1:15 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by alanp View Post
this showed up today. may be a little out of your price range but i bet it could be had for 1500

Road Bike - Cannondale CAAD 9 - 2010 - Size 50cm - $1800
White frame with red writting and some silver details
Full carbon forlk
All Dura Ace7800/7900 new components (DA 7900 deuraileurs)
53/39 crankset 170mm crankarm BB30 technology bottom bracket Carbon
Handlebar Easton EC90
Wheels Roval Classique Pave SL E5- 10sp w/ MichelinPro3 (new tires)
Bike was used only about 20 times
Bike is brand new (only used a few times)
Impecable condition: no scratches, no crashes!!!
I am sure that is just an example but there are a few things that are going to make it near impossible to buy a used bike. She is going to have to put the purchase on her CC so unless it is a used bike at an LBS it isn't going to work. Another problem with a lot of those race setup bikes is they have race cranks and she is going to need a compact crank since she is just using it for centuries and is use to a triple right now. I am hoping to find a compact doubel for her with a cassette something like an 11-27/27/28 or a 12-26/27/28 so she has some really low gears to grind up hills.

Thanks for the idea though. It would be a great way to go if she had cash.
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       02-29-2012, 1:25 PM Reply   
Either of the ones you posted will get the job done admirably, assuming they fit, have a women's saddle, etc. If performance is your LBS, I say go for it. If it's mail order.... meh. You'll end up spending fit $$$ one way or another at the LBS.
Old    Andy Graham (ottog1979)      Join Date: Apr 2007       02-29-2012, 1:26 PM Reply   
I second Alan's used bike route. Go the the bank, get a cash advance on the cc and pay the extra 3%. Even with that, you'll get SO much more bike for the money used. Or, it seems like with every statement I get "checks" to write against my credit card.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       02-29-2012, 2:26 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by shawndoggy View Post
Either of the ones you posted will get the job done admirably, assuming they fit, have a women's saddle, etc. If performance is your LBS, I say go for it. If it's mail order.... meh. You'll end up spending fit $$$ one way or another at the LBS.
Yeah, there is 3 or 4 peformance bikes in the Seattle area and one about a mile or 2 from my place so we will actually be able to try the bike out first and it will be completely built up and adjusted by performance bike. Not sure if they will offer lifetime tuneups or not but that would be nice.
Old    alan plotz (alanp)      Join Date: Apr 2001       02-29-2012, 6:00 PM Reply   
how about paypal? you can use a credit card with paypal and transfer the money instantly. i dunno the used bike market is just ripe with opportunities.
Old    Jeff Moore (jeff359)      Join Date: Jun 2005       03-03-2012, 8:07 AM Reply   
Remember that Internet vendors, just like an LBS wanna sell a bike. They tell you 90% assembled, but this isn't the case. I built two indentical bikes at work Thursday from a major brand. The first one went together smooth, with just a little wheel truing and minor adjustments. The second was a mess and needed threads chased, wheels needed truing, was missing stuff, bent derailer, and EVERYTHING needed to be dialed.

I'd rather start from the ground up and build, rather than build some of the 90% bikes. Don't always assume the internet is the best bet. If she's actually gonna ride it, make sure it fits great and works awesome. Only way to do that is at the LBS
Old    C.I.E..... Evan (guido)      Join Date: Jul 2002       03-04-2012, 8:35 AM Reply   
Brett, I was in the same situation with my wife a few years back. She signed up for some 60 mile rides and a couple of triathelons. We bought her almost that same Performance bike. It was on sale and cheap which worked great because it has not sit in my garage for 4 years. Hahahaha. It's a OK bike. Probably hard to beat for the price.

Honestly, I'd say to find a used steel frame with nice components, then pay a local shop to fit it for her. Almost every good shop will offer this as a service.

I've got a Bianchi 1885 that's aluminum with carbon stays and fork and it's actually pretty nice. It's a bit stiff for a all day bike, but it's quick and relatively light. I do love the new technology, but I still miss my old steel bikes. The were amazing for all day rides.

Reply
Share 

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 7:18 AM.

Home   Articles   Pics/Video   Gear   Wake 101   Events   Community   Forums   Classifieds   Contests   Shop   Search
Wake World Home

 

© 2012 eWake, Inc.    
Advertise    |    Contact    |    Terms of Use    |    Privacy Policy    |    Report Abuse    |    Conduct    |    About Us