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Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-27-2011, 11:35 AM Reply   
Hey all. I just picked up a depthsounder off of eBay to install in my '03 Malibu 23 XTi since it didn't come with one from the factory. I am going with the glue in puck-style transducer, but not exactly sure where to mount it. I found info on mounting locations for other boats, but not wakeboard boats in particular. I know I want to keep it away from any turbulent areas under the hull such as running gear, ballast ports, etc. And mount it where the hull is constantly in the water, i.e. not up around the bow.
I was wondering if anyone has installed one of their own. Or if your boat came with one from the factory, where is your transducer located at?
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       01-27-2011, 11:39 AM Reply   
on the malibu vdrives they install the puck right next to the transmission (under the rear seat). Dunno how that relates to the XTI, exactly, but I'd put it somewhere close to the centerline near the back. The resolution on these things isn't down to inches, so if you are a few inches above the lowest part of the boat it's still going to be good enough.
Old    Mikeski (mikeski)      Join Date: Aug 2003       01-27-2011, 11:39 AM Reply   
I mounted mine right next to the v-drive unit as low as I could get it. This way I could access it through the v-drive access panel.
Old    Mikeski (mikeski)      Join Date: Aug 2003       01-27-2011, 11:40 AM Reply   
On my direct drive it was right under the motor about 6" from center so it didn't get turbulent water from the fins
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-27-2011, 11:54 AM Reply   
Thanks for the quick info guys! Sounds like under my motor/transmission (since it is a direct drive) would make sense. I don't have to pull floor apart then.

Shawndoggy, I recognize you from over on Malibu Crew!
Old    Shawndoggy (shawndoggy)      Join Date: Nov 2009       01-27-2011, 12:07 PM Reply   
that's me.

On the turbulent water point... if you are going fast enough for the water to be turbulent, the depth gauge isn't going to help much anyway, eh? It doesn't predict depth in front of you it tells you how deep it is under the boat. It could correctly read 50' right up until you hit the rock outcropping.
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       01-27-2011, 12:49 PM Reply   
on my direct drive I put it almost center of the boat under the transmission, right near the output flange but leaving enough room to work with the coupler and be able to remove the trans if I ever have to. Picked this because it was not farther forward of the engine coolant intake, so should always be wet, and nothing tubulent in front of it. I was going to place it to the side, exactly opposite the water intake, but the hull wasn't flat there, so I went to closest spot that was flat to get the best fit and prevent runs/air pockets in the epoxy.
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-27-2011, 5:25 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by shawndoggy View Post
that's me.

On the turbulent water point... if you are going fast enough for the water to be turbulent, the depth gauge isn't going to help much anyway, eh? It doesn't predict depth in front of you it tells you how deep it is under the boat. It could correctly read 50' right up until you hit the rock outcropping.
I understand what you are saying and agree. But I still want to have it located where turbulent water won't affect it because I like to keep a constant watch of the water depth. Say I am cruising along, in some cases I can monitor the depth as it gradually gets deeper or shallower as it does in most cases for the lakes I frequent (except Powell) By no means does this insure no hazard will 'pop' up, but more or less peace of mind for myself.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cadunkle View Post
on my direct drive I put it almost center of the boat under the transmission, right near the output flange but leaving enough room to work with the coupler and be able to remove the trans if I ever have to. Picked this because it was not farther forward of the engine coolant intake, so should always be wet, and nothing tubulent in front of it. I was going to place it to the side, exactly opposite the water intake, but the hull wasn't flat there, so I went to closest spot that was flat to get the best fit and prevent runs/air pockets in the epoxy.

Did you do any test runs before epoxying? If you seemed to have had success, I may just go straight to epoxy and save myself some time. What kind of boat do/did you have? I am assuming it was a wakeboard boat, and had a similar hull design to a Malibu.
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       01-27-2011, 6:11 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRum View Post
Did you do any test runs before epoxying? If you seemed to have had success, I may just go straight to epoxy and save myself some time. What kind of boat do/did you have? I am assuming it was a wakeboard boat, and had a similar hull design to a Malibu.
I was going to do some test runs but didn't want to deal with getting water in the bilge and such to make it work. Can't be any air pockets or the gauge won't work. I just winged it. Checking inside and bottom of the hull and was pretty sure it would work. Boat is an '89 Supra Saltare.and I used a Humminbird HDR 610. I put it pretty much under the trans right in front of the coupler but behind the body of the trans. Looked far enough behind the fins that it wouldn't cause a problem. Gauge works great at idle and at speed. Boat tops out at 47 MPH on GPS and good readings even at top speed in chop.

Coudln't find a picture of the transducer mounted and boat is all buttoned down now, but in this pic it would be mounted right under the trans just a hair in front of the coupler and maybe slightly offset to starboard.

Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-27-2011, 6:39 PM Reply   
Perfect! Thanks Cory
Old    Harold Hemming (h20king)      Join Date: Dec 2009       01-28-2011, 5:43 AM Reply   
Although not the same glue in transducer you can see the location where I mounted my thru hull transducer its just in front of the v drive and slightly to one side where the fiberglass is flat.
Attached Images
  
Old    Baitkiller (baitkiller)      Join Date: Jan 2010       01-28-2011, 6:19 AM Reply   
When doing a "shoot-through" instillation (glue-in) a good trick to find a good location is to fill a zip lock bag with water, no air bubbles. Place the ducer on the bag and move it around until you get the best return.
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-28-2011, 6:29 AM Reply   
^^^^^
The boat has to be in the water to do this though, correct?
Old    Baitkiller (baitkiller)      Join Date: Jan 2010       01-28-2011, 6:43 AM Reply   
Yes we do this while underway to find the sweet spot that provides good returns at all speeds. Takes two people.
Granted we are talking actual fish-finders where return definition is very important. However I prefer to have trust my sonar regardless of class.

Another note, abrade the hull with some 80 grit and clean with acetone. Put silicone on both surfaces and push down with a slow twist. I have had the best luck with the fewest bubbles using this method.
Old    Sparky Jay (wake_upppp)      Join Date: Nov 2003       01-28-2011, 7:38 PM Reply   
I'd advise against silicone. Twp part epoxy is a much, much better choice. And acetone is too "hot" for some coatings and can soften or even melt them. Lighter fluid or naptha (pretty much the same thing) is far less harsh for general cleaning and works great as a wax and grease remover around the boat.
Old    Mikeski (mikeski)      Join Date: Aug 2003       01-29-2011, 9:15 PM Reply   
For what it's worth my old hummingbird type of depth sounder only provided good info about 50% of the time. My Faria oil bath sounder provides good info about 80% of the time. At first I was a bit hesitant about the oil bath well remaining sealed but it has not leaked a drop in 4 years.
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-31-2011, 1:36 PM Reply   
Bringing this thread back again....

Right along the centerline of my hull, there is a flat spot, which is kind of where I want to mount the transducer. I am thinking of putting it just forward of where the direct drive shaft passes through the hull. One thing though...tracking fins. I am wondering just how much turbulence these things produce. There are three of them right on the centerline. My thought is that they slice through the water line a knife and probably don't produce a whole lot of turbulence. Also, the spot where I am wanting to mount the transducer is about 5 feet back from the last tracking fin. I did a quick google search and found some info on a Perfect Pass install where they recommend that the distance from any strakes, fins, etc for the paddle wheel be 5-6 feet. Sounds like this should about the same for a transducer since neither of the two should have turbulent water passing by them.

My other option as mentioned by another user here is to mount it slightly off the centerline. But my engine water intake is on one side, and the other side has 5 brass ports sticking out for bilge plugs and ballast intake. Also, then I wouldn't exactly be mounting on the flat surface either. I feel that the tracking fins are going to produce the least amount of wash given my options.

Cory D, does your Supra have the fins as well?
Old    Sparky Jay (wake_upppp)      Join Date: Nov 2003       01-31-2011, 3:47 PM Reply   
You should not mount it right behind the tracking fins. Too much turbulance. Sounds like the best place would be either right in front of the raw water pickup or in front of the ballast intakes on the opposite side. A slight slant where the puck is mounted is not going to make a big difference in the guage performance but mounting it downstream of turbulance will make it very eratic.
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-31-2011, 4:01 PM Reply   
At the risk of sounding stupid lol......

Will the raw water pickup always stay in the water? Being that it is roughly at mid-ship, right under the engine, it seems like it could pop out of the water every once in a while, especially in the chop. If I go in front of that with the transducer, it seems like I would risk having that part of the hull out even more so.
That's why I was wondering although behind the tracking fins 4-5 feet would be enough to be turbulence-free while still having the hull remain in the water all of the time.
In reality, my main concern for a good reading would be at idle speeds when getting close to a shore line, so I would probably be OK going that far towards the bow with it. It would just be nice to be able to get a reading while at cruising speeds too.
Just thinking out loud, perhaps I am putting too much thought into it!
Old    Earmark Marine (david_e_m)      Join Date: Jul 2008       01-31-2011, 4:21 PM Reply   
Seth, a couple of things to consider. I'm just a stereo and electronics guy so I'm not that familiar with all the boat details. But, you used the Perfect Pass mounting recommendations as a reference. I'm assuming that the PP sensor is a mechanical paddle wheel of sorts that reads speed? The depth transducer is a sonar sender/receiver. The two have very little in common. One might have a limited tolerance for turbulence while the other may have far less tolerance for air bubbles. So I would avoid a path directly behind the fins at any distance. Most boats will always place transducers a bit off center. As long as you are out of the path of another device or inlet and its a location that stays within the water then you should be good. I really wouldn't worry about the depth distortion created by the small dead rise angle that is greatest in deep waters and minimized in shallow water where your safety concerns are. As a test, using the water-filled ziplock bag method when underway should verify the good and better locations and provide a bit of confidence.

David
Earmark Marine
Old    Seth Rozic (RedRum)      Join Date: Nov 2010       01-31-2011, 4:32 PM Reply   
That makes sense about the different tolerances for turbulence, never thought about that.
FYI- yes the perfect pass sensor is indeed a mechanical paddle wheel
Thanks!
Old    Sparky Jay (wake_upppp)      Join Date: Nov 2003       01-31-2011, 4:57 PM Reply   
Neither one should have any turbulance if you want it to perform consistent. That is why most PP installers will put the paddle wheel directly across from the raw water pickup on the opposite side of the hull but in the same spot. The boat manufacturer knows the cleanest spot to install the raw water intake. Regarding the raw water pickup being out of the water, you would have to be hitting some serious chop to get the hull out of the water that far back buddy! If you're hitting waves that big, you ain't gonna be worried about an inconsistant depth reading!
Old    Harold Hemming (h20king)      Join Date: Dec 2009       01-31-2011, 5:34 PM Reply   
If you are super worried about consistent accurate readings look for a different style unit.I think I have tried about every depth sounder made and the glue in transducers work some of the time at best.If you want accurate consistent readings a thru hull is a must.I have found The uniden QT 206 with a thru hull transducer to be about the best unit for the money I think mine was around $230 and it always works at all speeds but the down side for a lot of guys is it requires another hole in the boat.JMTC
Old    Sparky Jay (wake_upppp)      Join Date: Nov 2003       01-31-2011, 5:56 PM Reply   
Interesting. I've had nothing but Humminbird glue in type in my last 3 boats and all have performed quite well...
Old    Cory D (cadunkle)      Join Date: Jul 2009       02-01-2011, 9:46 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRum View Post
Cory D, does your Supra have the fins as well?
Yes, deep V up front with two fins. Transducer is several feet behind the fins and very close to centerline of the boat, maybe slightly offset to starboard. I have yet to see it blink or have trouble getting a reading.

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