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Old    Bill B (Task)      Join Date: Aug 2010       08-08-2010, 7:55 PM Reply   
Question to you all, if I am looking at some used older V-drive ski boats (2000 - 2003), is it safe to assume these older V-Drive boats will have a v-hull? Sorry, a bt of a newbie here, but am currently looking at some older V-Drive boats, but am not sure if they all have v-hulls (or if the manufacturer just put a v-drive into a non v-hull boat). Definitely want to buy a ski boat (Sanger, Malibu, etc), but want to be able to cut through the chop on the local lakes. Any feedback on this would be great (let me know if I need to clarify). Older boat suggestions to check out would be great as well.
Thanks!
Old    Tim C (lifetimewarranty)      Join Date: Oct 2008       08-08-2010, 8:11 PM Reply   
They are all different. Sangers are all generally at least semi-v (and have very good choppy water traits), but the others will all vary from model to model. I own a Sanger DLX, which is almost identical to the V210, and it handles big chop excellently.


As far as I know, most are not V-hull (like the older Malibu's, X-stars, etc).

Some of the older Mastercrafts - like the X10 - are not quite as flat as the typical ski boats, and that will help in the chop. I think that is why they made that boat, which is very similar to the original X-star in size, but the rear is convex (not v, more of a "U").

I'd bet that some of the Centurions are semi-v also...but not sure which ones.

I imagine we can start a list here:

Sanger V210 - definitely Semi V
Mastercraft X10 - Semi "U"
Too lazy to think of others...

Waterski mag online may have some online testing of that generation of boats - they go back a ways for their boat tests and should list the hull design.
Old    Jeff D (Jeff)      Join Date: May 2010       08-08-2010, 8:35 PM Reply   
I think you're confusing two terms because they both have a "V" in them. A v-hull and a v-drive don't necessarily have anything to do with each other.

You know what an "inboard" boat is right? Well, there are generally two types of inboard drive systems: Direct drive and v-drive and neither of those necessarily dictates the hull style.

It sounds like you already know what a V hull is but a v-drive refers to an inboard boat with a specific type of transmission. This transmission allows the engine to be mounted backwards (relative to a direct drive) and further back in the hull. The output shaft on the engine will point towards the bow and the v-drive transmission, through a series of gears, diverts the rotating force back about 160 degrees (Sideways "V" shape) or so. Advantages include better passenger compartment layout, better board sport wake. Disadvantages include drivetrain power loss due to the additional gearing and worse ski wake.

The most common application I know of for a v-drive is in 19-25 ft or so pleasure boats but they could be utilized for other applications.

If you're looking for a v-hull with a v-drive I don't know of any off the top of my head. The MasterCraft MariStar line (And their X... counterparts) have modified v hulls but they aren't nearly as deep as what you'd typically find on an inboard/outboard runabout.
Old    Jeff D (Jeff)      Join Date: May 2010       08-08-2010, 8:45 PM Reply   
Oh and the dead giveaway for a v-drive vs. direct drive is the big hump for the engine in the middle of the passenger compartment. If there is one then it's a direct drive and if there isn't one but there's a much larger compartment under the rear sundeck for the engine then it's a v-drive.

I'm sure someone will come along with some obscure exception to that rule but the above will apply to 99% of the inboards that you look at.
Old    Bill B (Task)      Join Date: Aug 2010       08-08-2010, 8:54 PM Reply   
Thanks guys for your responses.

Yes, I have been reseaching V-Drives and am familiar with direct drives. What was confusing to me (as you pointed out) was if having a v-drive automatically gives you more a of v-hull type boat. Based on input it sounds as if they are not. I guess I should have asked what older v-drive boats might handle chop better than others.
Old    jdgreen1            08-09-2010, 7:11 AM Reply   
Not sure about other boats, but the early Malibu VLX's (v-drives) do not handle chop very well. This is my experience anyways.
Old    AtTheLake (bmartin)      Join Date: Jan 2007       08-09-2010, 9:27 AM Reply   
Most Vs on inboards are not as deep as you will find on typical I/Os but they will vary between brands and models. Centurions have some of the deepest Vs through the hull and in turn do handl chop better than some others. If you want to get a quick feel how deep a v is in a boat look at the stern of the boat. See the difference in pics:

http://www.onlyinboards.com/Images.a...&ImageID=40243

http://www.onlyinboards.com/Images.a...&ImageID=40972
Old    Tim C (lifetimewarranty)      Join Date: Oct 2008       08-09-2010, 9:48 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Task View Post
I guess I should have asked what older v-drive boats might handle chop better than others.
See my original post...

To add to my list, I would also concur that the Maristars are made for heavier chop (although that generation X-star is a flat bottom), and I know that the Malibu's handle chop well also - although their hull seems really flat compared to some. Could be that they are just really solid boats, though.
Old    Brett Yates (polarbill)      Join Date: Jun 2003       08-09-2010, 9:50 AM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Task View Post
Thanks guys for your responses.

Yes, I have been reseaching V-Drives and am familiar with direct drives. What was confusing to me (as you pointed out) was if having a v-drive automatically gives you more a of v-hull type boat. Based on input it sounds as if they are not. I guess I should have asked what older v-drive boats might handle chop better than others.
The answer your question, NO. If you want an early 2000's vdrive that handles chop well then look at most Centurions, Sangers and Tige's. Those 3 brands are known for having deeper V hulls than other brands in that year range. This is just a general statement though and not all their models have deeper V's.
Old    KEVIN (kko13)      Join Date: Jul 2006       08-09-2010, 4:17 PM Reply   
The two I like for the deep V and good ride in that era are the Tiges and Supra. I run my 03 Tige in the gulf and in the bay handlees chop excellent. Sanger looks like they would do well but never had one out in the ruff stuff so I cant say for sure.
Old    Nick in the TC (nick_in_ssp)      Join Date: Aug 2006       08-09-2010, 5:32 PM Reply   
I have a a '97 Malibu VLX and doesn't ride very well in bigger waves. I was on a v-drive Sanger and it cut through bigger waves with ease. I was very impressed with how nice the ride was.
Old    Adam (apwrx)      Join Date: Feb 2008       08-09-2010, 6:35 PM Reply   
I had a 2001Malibu Wakesetter and as long as the center ballast was full it handled chop very well,better than the 98 reinell i/o it replaced.
Old    Bill B (Task)      Join Date: Aug 2010       08-09-2010, 8:11 PM Reply   
Thanks guys! Your feedback has really helped me ( a lot). The comments here have given me quite a few boats I need to research and look out for on Craigslist, etc. If there are others, please post em!
Thanks!
Bill
Old    Bill B (Task)      Join Date: Aug 2010       08-09-2010, 8:29 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmartin View Post
Most Vs on inboards are not as deep as you will find on typical I/Os but they will vary between brands and models. Centurions have some of the deepest Vs through the hull and in turn do handl chop better than some others. If you want to get a quick feel how deep a v is in a boat look at the stern of the boat. See the difference in pics:

http://www.onlyinboards.com/Images.a...&ImageID=40243

http://www.onlyinboards.com/Images.a...&ImageID=40972
yeah - those two pictures give me a much better understanding of what to look for between boats. You can definitely see a difference.
Old    RM (RPM_DLX)      Join Date: Jul 2010       08-09-2010, 8:56 PM Reply   
I have a Sanger DLX that I just bought a month ago. I came from a deep vee I/O (19 foot four winns). I am impressed with how well the sanger handles the chop. Its still not as good as the 19 foot deep vee but it does quite well and better than I expected. I will also say that when the sanger takes a good hit, the boat does a good job on taking it, like its a very solid boat. I am not sure on all the influencing factors, since the sanger is a heavier and longer boat as well.
Old    WakeMikey (wakemikey)      Join Date: Mar 2008       08-12-2010, 10:18 AM Reply   
Supra has been well known for having some of the deepest vee-bows on the market and they have since the 80's. If you are looking at early 2000's check the Supra Launch.
Old    Bill B (Task)      Join Date: Aug 2010       08-13-2010, 8:55 PM Reply   
Thanks for the tip! I will also check out Supra.

Also, I'm not going to limit myself to just v-drives. Many more used boats out there have the direct drives so think I will be targeting those as well.
Old    Dirtracer27x (dirtracer27x)      Join Date: Apr 2010       08-15-2010, 9:53 PM Reply   
my 04 centurion hurricane aka elite v drive handles chop with no probs,

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