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Old    Curtis (MalibuLX3)      Join Date: May 2010       07-09-2010, 11:18 AM Reply   
So I took a couple of my friends out the other day who have never been wakeboarding before, although they have been snowboarding for sometime. I've been wakeboarding for a couple of years now, although I still consider myself a beginner, and I don't really even think about how I get up, I just do it. When I started telling them what to do, I barely knew what to say. All I could think of was pull your legs in and point your toes forward and just let the boat pull your up. Well needless to say, with my limited directions neither of my 2 friends were able to get up that day. I've watch some youtube videos coaching others on getting up, but what do you guys say or do when taking a first timer out??

Hopefully they'll come out again, cause I know once they get up, they will love it.
Old    Chaserwaser            07-09-2010, 11:43 AM Reply   
Some of the biggest instructions I give are...
When the boat starts to go DO NOT try to stand up, let the boat pull you up... Alot of new riders tend to think once that boat engine hurls they need to stand up which causes that frontward knees bent fall / or ripping the rope from there hands..
When the boat starts to pull you up .. keep your elbows and knees bent very slightly and start to push your legs downward like your crushing someones head ( this will alow the legs to straighten instead of the knees bent when getting up which again causes that foward fall...
Once they stand up tell them to bring the rope into there leading hip so its touching there hip, this will cause their back to straighten instead of that "rope out in front of them knees bent frog look "

one of the big things I try to tell people is to keep there board horizontal and once the board is surfaced on the water that is when they should bring the rope to there leading hip allowing the board to turn...

It will come naturally to them just give it time just make sure you tell them to keep there knees bent and once they feel the boat pulling is when they need to start acting like there crushing someones head in the water with there legs to straighten them coming out thats one of the big keys
Old    Ryan (ryanw209)      Join Date: Jan 2010       07-09-2010, 12:11 PM Reply   
I keep it very simple... I tell them to ben there knees, put there arms on the outside of thier knees, when the boat starts to pull you let your knees get as close to your body as possible then DO NOTHING and stay in this position!!! Don't try to stand up, pull on the rope, angle the board...NOTHING. If they can resist the urge to pull on the rope or extend their knees then they will get up.
Old    LEE DANEILS (hyperlite)      Join Date: May 2009       07-09-2010, 12:17 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanw209 View Post
I keep it very simple... I tell them to ben there knees, put there arms on the outside of thier knees, when the boat starts to pull you let your knees get as close to your body as possible then DO NOTHING and stay in this position!!! Don't try to stand up, pull on the rope, angle the board...NOTHING. If they can resist the urge to pull on the rope or extend their knees then they will get up.
agreed. also tell them cannon ball position. that works as well
Old    John Anderson (fly135)      Join Date: Jun 2004       07-09-2010, 12:29 PM Reply   
Let a girl try first. In my experience the girls are much better on the initial getup. Then the guys feel stupid and try harder.
Old    Will Rice (willrice)      Join Date: Feb 2010       07-09-2010, 1:27 PM Reply   
Knees in your chest, arms completely straight between your knees. Then do nothing, let the boat pull you up.
Old    Jay Conrad (pwningjr)      Join Date: Apr 2007       07-09-2010, 1:28 PM Reply   
I always tell people "Heels to bum." This makes them take the cannon ball position as mentioned by Lee as well as takes care of the pointing their toes forward so they're not plowing water. Then tell them that they could ride all day in that position, they don't need to stand up until the board is completely out of the water. That usually gets real close.
Old    Brock Moran (Maddog10)      Join Date: Jun 2010       07-09-2010, 4:19 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by fly135 View Post
Let a girl try first. In my experience the girls are much better on the initial getup. Then the guys feel stupid and try harder.
It's so weird you said that. Just this past weekend I took my girlfriend, my sister and a couple of her "guy" friends out wakeboarding, none of which have ever been before. I've been wakeboarding a lot lately so I don't really even think of how to get up, I just do it. Like the OP said, I kinda had a hard time explaining it to them. The funny thing is though that both my girlfriend and my sister got up after just a few tries. None of my sisters friends got it the whole day. It was pretty funny to be honest... You might be on to something with this girls theory.
Old    Jeremy Byrom (wakerider111)      Join Date: Jul 2006       07-09-2010, 7:03 PM Reply   
if you have enough people and gear try going on a two-some.

you can help beginers get their board in the right position. help grab the rope for them and other things.
you can talk to them easier. even after they get up
basically teach by example. which is one of the best ways to teach, especially if you find yourself in a rare situation teaching someone with a language barrier... which is how i cam e up with this method and started using it.
Old    Dennie (wakeboardgeezer)      Join Date: May 2009       07-21-2010, 7:02 PM Reply   
I hear what your saying Curtis,

Since we started out riding it seemed every time we turn around someone wants to learn how so
we wrote up a gouge on how to get up first time riders.
It is lengthy but I will post it up here if you want.

regards,
The Geeze
Old    Seahawks #1 Fan Robert T (cwb4me)      Join Date: Apr 2010       07-21-2010, 7:20 PM Reply   
the above mentioned are all excellent advice the only thing i add is i get the person to sit on the deck with knees bent slightly . i give them my hand and tell them let me pull you up. then i point out how they let their butt come to their heels with their toes up and they stood up leaning against my arm and had their arm extended.then i let them put on their board and float away about ten feet . then i tell them to grab the handle and i say okay i'm the boat and i pull them towards the boat. i can watch how they handle that. and go from there. and you all are right it's much easier to teach girls or women because they listen and let the boat do the work. most but not all men want to prove they are stronger than the boat = faceplant or rope pop.
Old    Mason Love (Mason)      Join Date: Jul 2010       07-21-2010, 7:36 PM Reply   
I like to point the tip of the board towards the boat when the slack in the rope tightens. Then just bend your knees and lean back. Let the boat pull you up don't just stand up
Old    Dennie (wakeboardgeezer)      Join Date: May 2009       07-21-2010, 9:05 PM Reply   
Here is the down and dirty version we use Curt,

I know you know all this stuff.
Putting it down somewhere so it is handy is very helpful when teaching new riders.

We try to do alot of little things to give every advantage we can to the new rider trying to learn how to get up on their first deep water start.

Hope some of this helps but in any case please use at your own risk.

Give them a quick safety brief; Put them at ease; tell them about the signals to be used between them and the boat driver.
Tell them you will be in the water with them when they start and at anytime they feel concerned or threatened just let go of the rope etc.

1. find out if they are regular or goofy footed (to determine use, tug of war, push from behind with their eyes closed, skateboard foot push off methods etc)

2. Spread out the bindings on the board, with dominant foot at about 9 degrees ducked out and on the first set of binding holes and back foot at 90 degrees to the board and all the way at the back set of binding holes. What this does is cause 30% of your weight to be on the front of the board and about 70% of your weight on the back foot. This stance also helps the first timer from being pulled out the front once they get up. (this stance is just for getting up and doing some cruising no tricks using this stance as injury could result.)

3. Use only one fin at the back of the board, take the front fin off. (This helps turn the board when they first get up) Also try to use a larger fin in the back than normal if you have one. On our Sol and Rhythm we have several over-sized fins that we use in place of the stock fin to help make the board more stable for the newbie.

4. Test getting up using line in the boat first. Give handle to newbie put them in the correct position, ie tucked with heels to buttocks, shoulders back, chest up, knees bent, arms straight with knees inside arms. Fit the wakeboard to the rider, a 133cm board probably wont work for somebody 6'3' at 235 lbs (you get the drift). Generally for a newbie the bigger the board the better because: it slows things down once they get up and "generally" a bigger board creates more lift making it easier to get up for the first time which is all we are trying to do at this point.

5. Have someone that knows how to ride get in the water with them to assist them getting them into the correct position and to put them at ease (this probably helps more than anything else we do for the rider)

6. In the water put them in the proper stance, have the driver take up extra slack and put the new rider under "slight" tension and when they are ready tell them to holler out "hit it" or whatever signal you use.

It is also important to diagnose what they are doing wrong if they don't get up the first 3-4 attempts so you know what to tell them to correct the issue. There is nothing worse than an eager rider asking you "What am I doing wrong" and you not being able to articulate to them what to do. Here are a few common problems and fixes I found on the net that have been helpful to us;

Standing up too soon causes the board to sink. Keep in mind that you really can't stand up too late. If you want to ride around the whole lake in the original crouched position in which you started, you can certainly do that. Always err on the side of caution and stand up later rather than sooner. If you're working hard to stand up, it's probably too soon. Turning the board too soon will also often make the board sink. Remember, wait until the board is on top of the water before you stand and turn the board.

Muscling your way up often results in the "bungee-effect," where the rope suddenly becomes a weapon that you use to nail your friends in the boat with.
So keep your arms straight and shoulders back, and let the boat pull you up.

Plowing through the water is murder on your back and you'll feel it the next day. When you're hanging on and all that seems to happen is that water is pushing against the bottom of the board, thus stretching out your arms by a couple of inches, there's a simple solution - Slightly point your toes. You see, what's happening is that no water is getting under the board to lift it up. By pointing your toes, the board is put at a slight angle, allowing for water to rush under it and, as a result, lift it up.

Being pulled out the front If you don't hold your shoulders back, they will roll forward. When they roll forward, you'll lose leverage and get pulled right over the board.

What if you got up alright, but just can't seem to stay up? Here are some common mistakes that may be causing your problem...

The uncontrollable side slide is a precursor of the dreaded face plant. When the tail end of the board comes sliding around so that the front tip is no longer pointed in the direction of the boat, but rather both your feet are pointed at the boat, it is most often a result of not twisting at the waist and/or not keeping the handle at your lead hip. Twisting at the waist keeps your shoulders facing the boat while your feet face the shore.

Again Being pulled out the front may also result in a face plant. The cause? Improper weight distribution and/or leaving your arms straight out in front of you. If you find that you are constantly being pulled forward, consider putting a little more weight on your back foot. Ideally you'll want equal weight on both feet, but in the beginning, until you are more comfortable on the board, you may want to think of placing 70% of your weight on your back foot, and 30% on the front.

That is the jest of the main things we try to do and tell the new rider when trying their first deep water start.

We basically commit this stuff to memory because we often run into folks that want us to teach them to ride.

I am 56 and my memory isn't quite what it used to be so for me I have the info saved on my cell phone. I also have some videos on my phone of the steps for deep water starts and an example of all the steps to show the newbie in the boat after I finish with the talk/walk through.

This way I don't have to trust my memory and I don't miss covering anything with the new rider.

Good Luck, hope some of this stuff helps.

Regards,
The Geeze
Old    Tim (dukeno1)      Join Date: May 2006       07-22-2010, 6:18 PM Reply   
All of these responses are good and a lot of the same stuff we do. We took my friend's wife out the other day....never been on a board....she popped up the first pull! What I did for her, which really helped I think, was to have her put the board on in the yard and got her in the proper position, knees as close to her chest as possible. I told her to stay tucked in that position and then handed her the handle. I then pulled the rope by hand until she basically came up on to her feet in that same squat position. I told her that it would work exactly the same way in the water. We got her in the water and sure enough she popped right up. Didn't go that far the first time mind you but she got up! I think I will try that method again the future with any newbies. If you can get someone to just stay in that compact position and not try to do anything but hold on, they will most likely get up easily. I wish I had known that when I first learned! Would have saved me a lot of time and a bruised ego....
Old    Curtis (MalibuLX3)      Join Date: May 2010       07-22-2010, 8:34 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeboardgeezer View Post
Here is the down and dirty version we use Curt,

I know you know all this stuff.
Putting it down somewhere so it is handy is very helpful when teaching new riders.
Thanks for the reply's everyone, some really great advice. Dennie, thanks for your post, I'm going to print that out to take with me next time I take some new boarders out.
Old    Brant Williams (kitewake)      Join Date: Jul 2007       07-22-2010, 11:49 PM Reply   
I always have good luck getting first timers up and riding. What I do is this. I put my pop bags against the rear seat at an incline like a board in the water. I have them sit down in the boat...with their knees a bit bent, their butt on the floor. Put their feet on the pop bags. I give them the handle...and I stand on the engine cover and make a loop in the rope to pull on. I teach them to relax...keep their arms straight...and as I pull them...slide their butt forward until it hits their heels.....THEN let the pull lever them up over their feet...THEN finally stand up. You practice this a number of times in the boat.

You can see the errors they all make. They pull with their arms instead of relaxing and keeping them straight. They let their shoulders come forward instead of keeping them back. They don't relax their legs and let the knee bend increase. As soon as I see a hint of these errors...I stop the pull on the handle...and don't pull them up (off the boat floor). I make them relax and do it right. Do this 10 times and get them doing it right...and they know the feel. They usually get up pretty easily.

Once they are in the water, another key is to pop them up FAST. Hit the throttle hard. If they are relaxed in the arms and legs...and have a good grip...they will be up before they know what happened...

Last edited by kitewake; 07-22-2010 at 11:52 PM.
Old    KEVIN (kko13)      Join Date: Jul 2006       07-23-2010, 10:53 AM Reply   
Alot of the things here is the way I use to do it and had a good success rate.
The other day a thread came up about deep water starts. Not knowing what they were talking about I read into the post. I tried starting like this and found it so easy. I took a couple of people out the other day the one guy had been out b4 about 8 months ago and I did get him up the other had never been. I gave them the tips I learned about the deep water start. The guy who had been b4 was like WTF why didnt you teach me this way b4 (because I didnt know about the deep water start back then). the other guy took right to it and got up and looked like had been doing it for years. I will use this for all the new people I take out from now on. No more pulling to hard pulling over the front or I cant hang on. The deep water start is the way to go.
Old    Brock Moran (Maddog10)      Join Date: Jun 2010       07-23-2010, 2:27 PM Reply   
You can give them tons of instructions and it helps a great deal, but for me it seems like nothing is better than just letting them get out there and give it multiple tries. I mean I don't just strap them up and throw them the line saying "give it a shot." I guide them and try to help as much as possible but really they just have to try it to see what it's like. Once they ever get up it's like someone flipped a switch and they will get up everytime.
Old    Seahawks #1 Fan Robert T (cwb4me)      Join Date: Apr 2010       07-26-2010, 6:57 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by kko13 View Post
Alot of the things here is the way I use to do it and had a good success rate.
The other day a thread came up about deep water starts. Not knowing what they were talking about I read into the post. I tried starting like this and found it so easy. I took a couple of people out the other day the one guy had been out b4 about 8 months ago and I did get him up the other had never been. I gave them the tips I learned about the deep water start. The guy who had been b4 was like WTF why didnt you teach me this way b4 (because I didnt know about the deep water start back then). the other guy took right to it and got up and looked like had been doing it for years. I will use this for all the new people I take out from now on. No more pulling to hard pulling over the front or I cant hang on. The deep water start is the way to go.
kevin you may be able to teach a new rider the deep water start. but i think the regular sideways start is better for beginner because of balance and body position. they have no clue until they feel it . now if someone has wakeboarded two or three times and rode some distance ie 1/2 a mile or so they will understand but not necessairly believe they can get up that way[much like me and you when we first tried]but riders with some experience seem to always have sucess.thats why i would teach regular then deep water after they have been up a couple of times at your judgement.happy boarding

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