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Old    BJ Cail (bcail)      Join Date: Aug 2007       03-24-2010, 11:41 AM Reply   
For those of you that shoot a lot of wake, in the manual mode, how do you deal with the constantly changing sun angles? Every time we round a bend in the river the sun angle is different.

I obviously haven't shot much in manual mode but want to more frequently.
Old    Scott (scott_a)      Join Date: Dec 2002       03-24-2010, 2:45 PM Reply   
Shooting in manual mode will become much easier with time. There aren't any real secrets to it, you just have to be aware of the shifting light condition and keep an eye on your light meter when you make turns. So always remember to watch that light meter and maybe take a test shot after each turn to see how your exposure is looking.
Old    Matt Roy (mroy)      Join Date: Mar 2008       03-24-2010, 4:18 PM Reply   
BJ, if I'm shooting wake I will usually shoot aperture mode, with clouds and changing light it just makes it easier to get properly exposed shots. But there are times when I will shoot manual but rare for wake.
Old    Walt (Walt)      Join Date: Jan 2003       03-24-2010, 7:28 PM Reply   
Quote:
Originally Posted by mroy View Post
BJ, if I'm shooting wake I will usually shoot aperture mode, with clouds and changing light it just makes it easier to get properly exposed shots. But there are times when I will shoot manual but rare for wake.
I shoot aperture priority most of the time too.
Old    Joe Umali (dakid)      Join Date: Feb 2001       03-24-2010, 8:25 PM Reply   
i shoot in p mode. "p" stands for professional, right?

i shoot in aperture priority quite a bit.
Old    BJ Cail (bcail)      Join Date: Aug 2007       03-25-2010, 6:38 AM Reply   
Thanks for the input guys, ap it is.
Old    RileyBangerter (steezyshots)      Join Date: Feb 2008       03-25-2010, 10:08 AM Reply   
I shoot M almost all the time
Old    RileyBangerter (steezyshots)      Join Date: Feb 2008       03-25-2010, 11:19 AM Reply   
Unless I am shooting in my housing then I use AV
Old    Rich Dykmans (richd)      Join Date: Oct 2003       03-28-2010, 6:31 PM Reply   
I shoot in AV or TV and use EC as follows: (courtesy of Arthur Morris)

Exposure Simplified
Here are the basics.

Get in the habit of working in Av Mode and adjusting the exposure suggested by your camera’s evaluative or matrix meter reading by dialing in exposure compensation.



When the sun is out at full strength, that is, on a clear day at least an hour after sunrise or at least an hour before sunset, your camera’s evaluative or matrix meter is smart. It is rare in these conditions that you will need to compensate more than 1/3 stop in either direction.

When you are working in the shade, or when it is cloudy or overcast, or when the sun is out at less than full strength, then your camera’s evaluative or matrix meter is dumb. You will need to help it out in order to get the exposure that you want. The closer your scene is to white, the more you will need to help the meter.

1: If the sun is out at full strength and what you see in your viewfinder averages to a middle-tone or lighter and there are no white or bright highlights, you can use the metered exposure.

2: If the sun is out at full strength and what you see in your viewfinder averages to darker than a middle-tone and there are no white or bright highlights, you can use the metered exposure less 1/3 stop.

3: If there bright or white highlights in #1 or # 2, use 1/3 stop less light than recommended above.



4: If you are working in the shade, if it is cloudy or overcast, or if the sun is out at less than full strength and what you see in the viewfinder averages to a middle-tone, the best exposure will always be either the metered exposure or the metered exposure + 1/3 stop.

5- If you are working in the shade, if it is cloudy or overcast, or if the sun is out at less than full strength and what you see in the viewfinder averages to lighter than a middle-tone, you will need to add light to the metered exposure to come up with a pleasing exposure. The lighter the scene, the more light you need to add.



For scenes a bit lighter than a middle tone, add 2/3 stop of light.

For images well brighter than a middle tone, add 1 full stop of light.

For images that average to white, add 1 1/3 stops of light.

In white-out conditions add 2 full stops of light.



6- If you are working in the shade, if it is cloudy or overcast, or if the sun is out at less than full strength and what you see in the viewfinder averages to darker than a middle-tone and their are no bright or white highlights, you can use the metered exposure.

Because of the wordy qualifications that needed to be included above, the principles may seem more complex than they really are. To simplify things even further, consider the following:



Situation #1- Sun out, middle tone or brighter = 0.

Situation #2- Sun out, darker than a middle tone = -1/3.

Situation #3- Sun out, bright highlights against middle tone = -1/3; against dark = -2/3.

Situation #4- Sun in, middle tone = 0 or +1/3.

Situation #5- Sun in. Lighter than a middle tone = +2/3.

Well brighter than a middle tone = +1.

White: +1 1/3.

White-out conditions: +2.

Situation #6-Sun in, darker than a middle-tone = 0.

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