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Go Back   WakeWorld > >> Wakeboarding Discussion Archives > Archive through November 07, 2008

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Old    Dave (victory07rdr)      Join Date: Aug 2008       09-29-2008, 4:46 PM Reply   
Alright, I'm 6'5" tall and 225 lbs. I tried wakeboarding for the second time and still could not get up. I was on a Ronix Ibex 144 so I'm sure the board is fine. I've read a lot about how to get up, and I'm pretty athletic so obviously I'm a little frustrated. Why do I just plow water and then have to let go of the handle? It's like I'm being pulled under water or something. I'm not trying to stand up too early, just trying to wait for the board to plane but that never happens. I'm using the ski pylon in a direct drive boat, but I've read that shouldn't matter. Any advice? Thanks
Old    Cal (phenom_1819)      Join Date: Jan 2008       09-29-2008, 4:56 PM Reply   
Dave,

This is what I see as the problem:
"I'm pretty athletic so obviously I'm a little frustrated". I'd be willing to bet that it's the fact that you consider yourself athletic that's holding you back.

We pop unathletic girls (and guys) out of the water, because they don't visualize themselves standing up and riding the board. It's the athletic guys (and girls) that seem to have the hardest time getting up.

The key to getting up is... don't do a damn thing! Get your body as tight as you can (it will be uncomfortable at first), and let the boat pull you out of the water.

Generally, when people push water it's because your body is too open. Pull your heels as close to your butt as possible (not your butt to your heels!), straighten your arms as much as you can pressed around the outside of your knees, get tight and hold on. Even when you're ready, DON'T stand up (you could ride forever crouched...just focus on getting up).

When done right, there will be little to no strain on your body, hands and arms.

Hope that helps.
Old    Nick in the TC (nick_in_ssp)      Join Date: Aug 2006       09-29-2008, 4:57 PM Reply   
When someone is having trouble like you said I always tell them to try to come up and over the tow edge of the board. The harder you try the harder it is going to be. Sometimes I also tell the rider to not even try to get up on this try just try to go up over the board and do a belly flop on the other side of the board. Once you learn how to come up and over all you have to do is turn your board and stay on top of the water. Easier said than done sometimes.
Old    WakeViolater (wakeviolater)      Join Date: Sep 2004       09-29-2008, 4:57 PM Reply   
keep your arms straight, and knees bend. you should have your elbows touching your knees. start on your back in this "fetal position". when the boat starts pulling let the rope rotate you so the board goes under your butt. STAY SEATED and with your elbows touching your knees until the board is above the water, sliding sideways, then stand up.

I think the key is that when you start getting pulled you need to let the rope pull you from "back flat on the water" to "board flat on the water", a 90 degree rotation towards the boat. this should be done with little to no strain on you.
Old    Brett (wakebrett)      Join Date: Sep 2008       09-29-2008, 4:58 PM Reply   
My dad was having the same problem, and sorry to say I couldn't help him either. hes about your size just a little smaller. all I can say without messing you up is dont give up! eventually it will happen and become second nature to you! good luck and I hope someone can give you more help then I did
Old     (1boarder_kevin)      Join Date: Mar 2007       09-29-2008, 4:59 PM Reply   
take your elbows and wrap them around your knees while touching your butt to your heels. as the boat goes in gear, slowly push the board down so you are at a 45 degree angle. The tighter ball your body is, the easier to get up. Make sure the driver isn't snatching you up. I would rather pull a beginner up too slow than too fast

it sounds like you are flat on your back plowing as the boat takes off. it is impossible to get up flat on your back
Old    Timothy (timmy)      Join Date: Jul 2001       09-29-2008, 5:08 PM Reply   
Your problem is that you are pushing with your legs and possibly also pulling with your arms. This almost without fail happens to athletic guys when they are learning.

Concentrate on not pushing at all with your legs. Stay tucked in a ball, knees to your chest and ankles to your butt. Let the boat rock you up on your feet as it gains speed, wait until you are planing to stand up.
Old    steve (ss1234)      Join Date: Jul 2005       09-29-2008, 5:20 PM Reply   
When teaching people who have this similar issue, I've told them to turn the board so the nose is a bit out of the water. It seems to help them get out of the water plow and get the board on the water quicker. They come out of the water already on edge heading out of the wake rather than in a board slide position.
Old    Dave (victory07rdr)      Join Date: Aug 2008       09-29-2008, 5:35 PM Reply   
How do you keep from being flat on your back when starting out? It seems like I lay pretty much on my back just due to how the life jacket positions me.
Old    PAUL (pnichols)      Join Date: Jan 2007       09-29-2008, 5:44 PM Reply   
All good advice above...the only thing I can add is point your toes up as well. This will help prevent you from digging your toe side edge in once you do get up. Good luck!!!!
Old    Jill (raynegrl)      Join Date: Jun 2008       09-29-2008, 6:03 PM Reply   
What helped me was: Stay tucked with butt to the board, elbows next to knees, don't take your eyes off the tower (don't look down at the water), DON'T push out with your legs...just relax and let the boat pull you up, don't think about it!! Don't give up - you'll get it! lipart{happy}
Old    Dave S (bogiedog1)      Join Date: Jun 2008       09-29-2008, 6:25 PM Reply   
When I have a first-timer i bring a portable dvd and show Murray's Detention 2012 segment about getting up, it shows from the side an under water shot of someone getting pulled up. It really helps visualize how it is done. If you plan on riding a lot the dvd will teach great basics.

I agree with those that said your pushing too much with leg's, like your doing a leg press....Stay tightly tucked, angle the top of the board forward and as your getting pulled "ride" it up to the surface of the water.
Old    walt            09-29-2008, 6:49 PM Reply   
I'll share a trick that someone showed me once. Have the newbie in the water and throw them the handle. Pull them up to the swim deck in the starting position (Knees bent and arms straight out while the board is touching the swim deck) Now pull on the rope while they hold on and BINGO. It's the same exact feeling as the real thing. Let the boat do the work ! Big guys seem to have a hard time wrapping their mind around that. (me included)

I watched a guy trying for 20 minutes or so when I was riding over the summer. When I was done with my set I went over and asked him if he wanted help and he did. I jumped in and after telling his driver to STOP power turning I used this technique and he got up on the first time.

It was pretty cool to see him out there shredding the Knar after banging his head on the wall for so long.

Good luck !
Old    Sparky Jay (wake_upppp)      Join Date: Nov 2003       09-29-2008, 6:54 PM Reply   
Point your toes at the boat. The board needs that angle or it will never "pop" out and up on the water.
Old    Keith (tversetti)      Join Date: Jan 2008       09-29-2008, 7:42 PM Reply   
The problem with my friends was always the toe pointing...stay tight and spin the board soon enough when you are first learning and you will be all set.
Old    wes graves (dkmode34)      Join Date: Mar 2004       09-29-2008, 8:03 PM Reply   
wHEN THE BOAT STARTS TO PULL YOU LET YOUR BUTT GO TO YOUR HEELS AND LET THE HANDLE TRAVEL OVER THE BOARD. THAT WILL POP YOU OUT OF THE WATER.
Old    Loren (helix_rider)      Join Date: Mar 2003       09-30-2008, 7:35 AM Reply   
Dave, almost all good points here...make sure you do as someone suggested (bring your heels to your butt...NOT your butt to heels, it is an important distinction).

With regards to the laying with your back on the water...that is okay. As you lay on the water, once the line tightens up it will tend to pop your shoulders up and out of the water. At that time, you should be ready to go. Once the boat begins pulling, you need to visualize actually 'pulling' the board under the water. You cannot wait for the boat to pull you on top of the water, it won't happen. You need to pull your heels backwards/down towards your butt. Once that board gets under the water, Bernoulli's principle will do the rest (just like an airplane wing). The key is pulling the board under the water BUT still stay crunched up...do not straighten your legs or pull in on the handle. Best of luck.
Old    Nick Bigger (nbigger)      Join Date: May 2008       09-30-2008, 8:26 AM Reply   
Another good way to learn is on a barefoot boom on the side if you know someone who has one. It will give you the feeling of geeing up and then you move back to the rope.
Old    Jeremy Byrom (wakerider111)      Join Date: Jul 2006       09-30-2008, 1:37 PM Reply   
The shortest easiest way to describe the average get-up-position is "Cannon Ball" position. just thought i'd add that for a short sweet and simple version if helpful.

i found this on an early thread and i find it usefull too

Upload
Old    Buzz (buzz_grande)      Join Date: Mar 2004       09-30-2008, 1:57 PM Reply   
Prefect Jeremy. I have seen that as the biggest problem when someone is plowing. Great pic by the way! They push with their heels, and the board just digs in. Point your toes so the board is at an angle, and it WILL come up on top of the water and start skimming.

(Message edited by buzz grande on September 30, 2008)
Old    michael z (absoluteboarder)      Join Date: Aug 2002       09-30-2008, 4:06 PM Reply   
I dont believe it was mentioned but slow down. if the driver pulls real slow and only gradually increases speed it allows you to sense what you need to do, only when you appear to have it should the driver give a little more.
when learning, some pull too fast not giving the beginner a chance to adjust
Old    Tim B (nvboarder)      Join Date: Nov 2005       09-30-2008, 5:52 PM Reply   
Okay I didn't read all the post but I have gotten about 50 people up and usually by the second try. The biggest mistake everyone makes, is placement of the board. Heres what I tell everyone, inside of elbows to the outside of your knees, knees bent and the board needs to be at about a 45 degree angle, and UNDER THE WATER 6" - 12" If you are plowing water and your fingers smack the board because you can't hold on any longer you did not let the board go under the water!!! Slower speeds help to, you don't have to gunn it to get up!!!!
Old    Tim B (nvboarder)      Join Date: Nov 2005       09-30-2008, 6:00 PM Reply   
You mentioned earlier that when your in the water you float on your back, because of the vest which is fine and the board is straight up and down. Which is normal, have the driver put it in gear just a little, when you feel a slight pull from the boat, allow the board to go under the water a little pull your ankle to your butt and have the inside of the elbows wrapped around the outside of your knees and you will be in the right position and then say hit it and you will pop right up.

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