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-   -   Transitioning from toe to heel riding switch (http://www.wakeworld.com/forum/showthread.php?t=800623)

brycejb328 12-15-2013 6:56 AM

Transitioning from toe to heel riding switch
 
I have been snowboarding for 10+ years. My skills in snowboarding have remained the same for 9 of those 10 years.

I was staying on some easy hills with my gf so I decided I would make it challenging by trying to take every time down riding switch. I started getting a feel for it, but the same issue kept coming up. When I would edge toeside, I would have a hard time transitioning back to my heel side and would sometimes get "stuck" in a hard toeside carve and just end up riding it out to a stop.

Any tips or trick to avoid this? I thought a slight binding adjustment might help until I get a better feel for it.

dezul 12-17-2013 3:55 AM

What board are you using? Is it a directional or twin tip? The best thing is keep practicing. I know for me, it is tough because I ride all the way back on my directional tip board. Other notables is your weight distro. You may want to focus on going from Toe to Flat, then see if you can transition from flat to heelside. I know you will pick up speed quickly but the speed will help with the transition to the heel.

brett33 12-17-2013 6:44 AM

I agree with Tim. I would just concentrate on standing up a little more after your toe/ heel cuts and not changing so abruptly. Take your time in the cut and go heel to flat to toe, toe to flat to heel.

dvsone79 12-18-2013 11:48 AM

Another way to think of it: imagine your board is pointed directly downhill. It's easy to transition from one edge to the other, regardless of weight on front or back foot. Now imagine your board is pointing towards your toe side at a 45 degree angle and your weight is mostly on your back foot. This means you're probably pushing snow instead of carving through it. If you try to go to your heel edge you'll catch that edge. Now imagine your board is the same position: 45 degrees on your toeside, only this time you've got your weight on your from foot so you're carving through the snow instead of pushing it down the hill. When you get ready to transition to heel side, just go ahead and set that edge, but keep your weight on your front foot so you're continuing to carve through the snow instead of pushing it. Once that edge is set, for a split second you'll be on heel edge with your heels still facing downhill, which sounds like a recipe for catching an edge, but remember you're carving through the snow instead of pushing it, and before you know it you'll naturally start turning towards your heel side and with your weight on your front foot you can easily swing your back foot around and do a quick speed check. But by then it will probably have just taken care of itself and you can just continue shredding.

That was basically a long way of saying keep your weight on your front foot. But I wanted you to know WHY. In actuality weight distribution should be more or less even between front and back feet, but as beginners, we tend to keep way too much on our back foot so it just helps to think to ourselves "weight on front foot".

brycejb328 12-18-2013 6:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dvsone79 (Post 1856215)
Another way to think of it: imagine your board is pointed directly downhill. It's easy to transition from one edge to the other, regardless of weight on front or back foot. Now imagine your board is pointing towards your toe side at a 45 degree angle and your weight is mostly on your back foot. This means you're probably pushing snow instead of carving through it. If you try to go to your heel edge you'll catch that edge. Now imagine your board is the same position: 45 degrees on your toeside, only this time you've got your weight on your from foot so you're carving through the snow instead of pushing it down the hill. When you get ready to transition to heel side, just go ahead and set that edge, but keep your weight on your front foot so you're continuing to carve through the snow instead of pushing it. Once that edge is set, for a split second you'll be on heel edge with your heels still facing downhill, which sounds like a recipe for catching an edge, but remember you're carving through the snow instead of pushing it, and before you know it you'll naturally start turning towards your heel side and with your weight on your front foot you can easily swing your back foot around and do a quick speed check. But by then it will probably have just taken care of itself and you can just continue shredding.

That was basically a long way of saying keep your weight on your front foot. But I wanted you to know WHY. In actuality weight distribution should be more or less even between front and back feet, but as beginners, we tend to keep way too much on our back foot so it just helps to think to ourselves "weight on front foot".

This makes complete sense. I know for a fact that I am weighting the back leg too much making it difficult to manipulate the board.

granddaddy53 01-07-2014 2:19 AM

hard solution, but there is only one way
 
you have been flopping edges on regular because no real proper instruction, please do not be insulted but i learned at the burton method center in jackson hole wyoming learning on essentially was ice. snowboarding turns are initiated one foot at a time to bend or edge the board. as you go from toes to heals the front foot toe is raised while the back foot remains toe down. as you join the front foot with the back toe up to heals(the opposite of your problem) people slide out heals because the fail to put slight pressure on the toe front to stop the slide out after the back foot joins the front in toes up. conversely as you go from heals to toe, the front toe presses down while the back foot remains heal (again bending the board to initiate a hard edge bite), then when turn has been initiated from front foot only, then the back foot goes toes down to join the other foot when the board goes all toes. feet are supposed to be moved independently and at different times in the turn. then for your problem it is not only what i have described, it is the combiniation of flexing ankles and knees more to come from edge to initiate turn and then after the independent foot movements have been accomplished you must extend knees and ankles and rise up on to your "T"( meaning you have to lean down the mountain like skiing which on the board creates a T between you and the board the board is the top of the t and you are the stick that is now straight aligned with the board's down hill attitude. as your body is t'd to the mountain in a down hil attitude. as you extend your knees and ankles coming out of the turn. this is a rythmic movement that makes the edge bite and stop you from what you described which actually is skiing or boarding up hill in your curve because of no extension no tee down the mountain. again on our good side we flop edges like wakeboarding except you dont' have feet of water to which to flop your edge into which takes your flop movement easily. start initiating your turns with your feet front foot first after you have flexed your knees and ankles coming into the turn, then next foot and then t down the mountain as you extend knees and ankles. the result of not doing this is that people swish the back end of the board around which you can easily do regular though inefficient, then when you resort to that on switch you have not control because switch is like throwing a baseball with your left hand if your are right handed. so the bad method is no longer controllable. i have spent the last two years hard working this movement and came from breck at the dew cup and just kept working the system to refine my edge control, that edge is designed to bite, bit it will not without bending the board 1st and then extension of the knees and ankles which pushes it into the snow for edge bite when the feet are at same attitude. the final tip is that all of this accurs from the waist down only and only your head which i forgot to explain turns where you want to go 1st. then the knee and ankle flex with independent tow movement and the body above the waist stays still and in line with the board with your front hand palm flat on the front side of your front leg. the quite upper body allows all of the above to bite the board without throwing off your center of gravity and "T" down the mountain. how bout dem apples

granddaddy53 01-07-2014 2:22 AM

by the way watching danny davis after 4th place in pipe go down to the base and he was slashing any snow pile he could find was real cool to see in person. these dudes like many wakeboarders are ity bity except for shaun's powerful squat out legs. kelly clark is bigger than all of the boys except greg bretz who became only the 3rd dude(keven, danny now greg) do defeat shaun ever in a half pipe competition


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