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-   -   Winterizing v drive (http://www.wakeworld.com/forum/showthread.php?t=800094)

aaron_bloski 09-26-2013 8:48 AM

Winterizing v drive
 
Hey guys, I'm new to the world of v drive boats and am wondering if someone could help me with a few questions. I recently purchased a 2007 Chopper CH-428, unfortunately there isn't a lot of information available on these boats except that they are out of business and were built in Madera, California. I have had it out a few times and love it. It isn't as luxurious as a top of the line Malibu, but from what I can tell is it just doesn't have the features. Rumour has it that it is even a Malibu hull, depending who you talk to....

So first off, any info that anyone has on these boats would be greatly appreciated, good or bad.

My main questions are about winterizing. The boat has a scorpion 350, and a Walter V drive in it, and was winterized two weeks ago. Then I bought it, and well there was no way I was waiting till next spring to run it. ha ha

I have had a few boats in the past, although both of them were Sea doo jet boats. One I had to run antifreeze through the system and the other was basically an oil change since it was a closed loop cooling system. So I am just wondering what steps I need to take to winterize this new one. I live in Saskatchewan, Canada, and it is going to get down to -40 Celcius soon enough. I would love to say I have a heated garage to store it in but, I don't. Although I am in the process of insulating mine to help.

Thanks for any help, I really appreciate it!

Aaron

dezul 09-26-2013 9:41 AM

In order to not have to retype everything. I will provide you some links for you to read. They are considered required reading. Post questions only after you have read them all.

http://www.wakeworld.com/news/featur...your-boat.html

http://www.wakeworld.com/forum/showt...ight=winterize

http://www.wakeworld.com/forum/showt...ight=winterize

dezul 09-26-2013 9:45 AM

Basically suck some antifreeze solution that is rated well below -40 Celcius through it and the ballast system, fog the cyclinders and throttle body, use some stabil solution in a full tank of gas, pull the batteries, wash and wax boat, ensure all water is out of the bilge area,

Optional: put the rear of the trailer on jack stands to get the tires off the ground.

I hope that helps.

Iceberg 09-26-2013 9:54 AM

1. Remove the drain plug from the boat.
2. Thoroughly clean the boat inside and out. Inspect the hull for any residue or algae growth and remove if required.
3. Clean the bilge area thoroughly and operate the bilge pump to remove any water from the bilge hose.
4. Remove all seat cushions and open all storage areas to allow air circulation in the boat interior. When thoroughly dry, replace cushions and close storage areas.
5. Top off fuel tank to prevent any condensation from accumulating in the fuel system. Use a commercially available fuel stabilizer to remove water and prevent gumming.
6. If the boat is stored on its trailer, ensure that the boat is properly positioned. If possible, lift the tongue so that the bow is slightly raised to promote drainage from the drain hole.
7. Install the canvas cover and secure the straps in accordance with cover instructions.
8. Always be sure to fully drain ballast tanks before storage. If water freezes in tanks or pumps, major damage can occur.

Engine:

Change your oil. (you may not have to being it was just changed)

Before your last water outing, if you can, change your transmission fluid If it needs it. Ensure you have no moisture in the transmission fluid. Do not run you transmission while the prop-shaft is out of the water!

Flush your engine for a minute or so using the hose attachment point.

Ensure water filter/inlet is empty or drain it.

Ensure filler hose is drained (open) when draining the system.

If it is a open loop (runs water through the engine and out the exhaust) you have to drain the engine block, manifolds and potentially the lower exhaust.
(If it is closed loop, you may only have to drain the manifolds, raw water pump and heat exchanger.)

Open engine block drain pet-cocks or remove lower water-jacket drain plugs. If no water drains, use a probe to clear debris. You must ensure the block is drained. Re-install plugs (22 lb-ft) or close pet-cocks.

Open/remove exhaust manifold drain plugs. Re-install. Depending on engine, one will be fore and the other side aft.

Crank engine briefly without starting to clear the Raw Water Pump. Disconnect both hoses to the pump and let drain. Re-install the hoses. This is also a good time to inspect your impeller and possible change it (or wait until spring).

Ensure fuel hose/drain is water free. This may require pulling a fuel line, so be fuel safe.

If you have a heater or water hoses that may trap water, remove the highest and lowest point to drain and run air through the lines to ensure they are clear. For the heater only, you could run some plumbers anti-freeze through the lines if you are concerned about trapped water in the exchanger.

That should keep you safe in a prairie winter.

Think of it this way, they are almost all small block chevy engine - marinized, with appendages that are engine brand specific. So in most cases, the engines and systems are very similar. If you don't have the boat manual or specific engine manual for your boat, you can usually find an engine manual on-line.

Pad1Tai 09-26-2013 10:08 AM

Where do you live and how many months till you fire it back up..

The reason I ask is don't fog the TB or cylinders if your going to be down for 4 months or so.. If you do, it's a spark plug change and TB cleaning... I run the fuel down to almost empty and leave it.. then top it off in the spring with 93 octane.. Never had water issues..

I also do not change the oil b4 winterizing, all that does is absorb moisture all winter.. I drain it in the spring when every ounce of oil has drained over the winter in the pan... Good Luck...

JArthurSquid 09-26-2013 10:25 AM

The best advice I was ever given on boat ownership was to pay a professional to winterize any v-drive boat.

If you miss doing any of the above listed steps perfectly, you could be looking at thousands of dollars in damage. For the amount of money it would cost in gas for a weekend of watersports, you can sleep easy knowing your boat was winterized correctly.

Just my 2 cents.

tuneman 09-26-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JArthurSquid (Post 1846779)
The best advice I was ever given on boat ownership was to pay a professional to winterize any v-drive boat.

If you miss doing any of the above listed steps perfectly, you could be looking at thousands of dollars in damage. For the amount of money it would cost in gas for a weekend of watersports, you can sleep easy knowing your boat was winterized correctly.

Just my 2 cents.

This is what delers tell you to scare you into thinking winterizing is crazy difficult and that engines are made of egg shells. Winterizing is super easy. Costs me $50 each season for antifreeze, oil and filter. If you just get the water out and the antifreeze in, you'll be good. Been winterizing for 15 years, in the Minnesota tundra, and never had an issue.

bcrider 09-26-2013 11:00 AM

As others have stated. Once you learn how to do it it's really not that difficult. Although I have a DD I still winterize it myself every year. It's not a hard process.

dezul 09-26-2013 11:16 AM

The thread posted below has some of the best pictures and how-to on winterizing your engine. You will have to sign up in order to see it.

http://www.centurioncrew.com/index.p...k-scorpion-57/

Giddyup 09-26-2013 5:22 PM

where abouts are you in Sask im also in saskatchewan, i have be getting a dealer to do mine the first couple of years as my boat was brand new, i did all my other vdrives myself, let me know, might be able to help
giddyup

Bumpass1 09-26-2013 5:56 PM

Quick question on the subjet that i ever seen the answer to, how are you getting the antifreeze into the engine? Pulling the hose and putting it in a bucket of antifreeze or is there a better way

dezul 09-26-2013 6:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bumpass1 (Post 1846828)
Quick question on the subjet that i ever seen the answer to, how are you getting the antifreeze into the engine? Pulling the hose and putting it in a bucket of antifreeze or is there a better way

Use a fake-a-lake and connect a piece of hose to it. Put the hose in a bucket of antifreeze. It will suck the antifreeze out of the bucket when you start it. I usually try to suck 3-5 gallons through it.

Bumpass1 09-26-2013 7:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dezul (Post 1846830)
Use a fake-a-lake and connect a piece of hose to it. Put the hose in a bucket of antifreeze. It will suck the antifreeze out of the bucket when you start it. I usually try to suck 3-5 gallons through it.

I thought about that but wasnt sure if it would be an issue with priming. I normally take it in and have mine winterized by the shop but they are expensive ($350) just to pump full of antifreeze and change the oil.

Simple enough to take care of myself.

dezul 09-26-2013 7:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bumpass1 (Post 1846835)
I thought about that but wasnt sure if it would be an issue with priming. I normally take it in and have mine winterized by the shop but they are expensive ($350) just to pump full of antifreeze and change the oil.

Simple enough to take care of myself.

No priming needed with the raw water pump. It pumps when the engine is started...aka that impeller you get replaced annually that is connected to the serpentine belt on the engine.

aaron_bloski 09-27-2013 9:42 AM

Thanks for the help guys, I think for this year I am going to get a shop here in Saskatoon to do it. He told me since the oil and filter was already done, he will drain the water out and get everything else set up for $100. Next year I will do this myself, but being so new to me I am just not comfortable enough with the boat to risk it, and my piece of mind is definitely worth the $100.

Thanks again, for all the info though, I really do appreciate the input.

On a side note. Anyone heard much of these Chopper boats? The lack of information out there is killing me!! Although I love the boat.

Thanks again!

jbach 09-27-2013 2:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JArthurSquid (Post 1846779)
The best advice I was ever given on boat ownership was to pay a professional to winterize any v-drive boat.

boat dealer give you that advice? you're most likely paying some 16 year old kid working after school to winterize your boat instead of taking 30 minutes of reading to learn how to do it correctly.

boardman74 09-28-2013 6:35 AM

Man if i could get someone to winterize my boat for $100 i'd be all over it. Thats a good deal.

rallyart 09-28-2013 7:25 AM

Aaron that is a good choice. There are not enough hours you put on to worry about the oils. Just make sure all the water is out and you are golden. That is an easy thing to do on a Mercruiser unless you have a heater, which you'll appreciate, or a shower. Adding a cylinder lube to the fuel is nice when it's stored for a long time but you live in a dry area so it's less of an issue. Mercruser recommends sucking it through the fuel line but I spray a fogging oil in the plug holes. I've never used antifreeze.
If the water is out completely you cannot freeze your block.
Chopper boats were a very small California manufacturer that made boats for a couple years before the US housing crash. When they were running it was very hard to get info on the boats.

Iceberg 09-28-2013 8:42 AM

Chopper boats from an old thread. Consensus, looks like an MB and built by (possibly) previous MB employees. They entered the market at the worst possible time.

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...btCd6UJt5w9D2Q
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...vvGT2aMxznjCRl

http://www.wakeworld.com/forum/showthread.php?t=642095

rexlex01 09-28-2013 11:55 AM

Do you drain all the water out and then do the bucket of anti-freeze or just do the bucket method without a pre-water drain?

rallyart 09-28-2013 7:41 PM

You should drain water first so nothing is diluted. The RV antifreeze looks like a slurpy when it's really cold. The more water in it, the more solid it is. Don't use automotive antifreeze.

dezul 09-29-2013 6:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rallyart (Post 1847022)
You should drain water first so nothing is diluted. The RV antifreeze looks like a slurpy when it's really cold. The more water in it, the more solid it is. Don't use automotive antifreeze.

^^^ This. There is a plug on the V-drive that you should check also. It isn't a huge deal though, I normally never get water out of it once I pull all the blue plugs on the engine.

illini88 09-29-2013 7:16 AM

I like to drain the block and manifolds first and then run antifreeze through it. That being said, I've been a number of boat dealers who just set up big tanks of antifreeze, hook the boats up to them and let them run for a sufficient amount of time, without ever pulling the plugs. I like the peace of mind of knowing there shouldn't be any water in there, and I also would have to run more antifreeze if I wasn't going to drain, as you'd need to let it circulate longer to be sure all you have in there is antifreeze.

Also, I've started putting my wet/dry vac on the hoses after I pull the plugs. Just gets out that last little bit of water.

scottb7 09-29-2013 7:42 AM

In the past I have manually drained out the water and then poured in the rv antifreeze. This year - and maybe going forward - I am going to skip the rv antifreeze. Also, PCM - when I emailed them said that fogging the engine is unnecessary unless storing over a year.

joeshmoe 09-29-2013 12:14 PM

"boat dealers who just set up big tanks of antifreeze, hook the boats up to them and let them run for a sufficient amount of time"
only problem is if the boat has a heater the heaters don't circulate unless the boat is moving, so the anti-freeze is Not circulated into the heater core, so the heater hoses have to be drained anyway along with the water that is in a reservoir In the engine used for heating.


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