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WakeWorld Discussion Board » >> Boats, Accessories & Tow Vehicles Archive » Archive through November 17, 2003 » amps /batteries « Previous Next »
By martin potts (kiwi) on Tuesday, September 09, 2003 - 1:29 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Ok I'll admit it I'm a complete dummy when it comes to wiring up anything ;but I have a problem
I've got a lightningaudio 150:2channel to run my 500watt sub .I have also got a 600watt 4channel lightning amp I'm going to install .Ihave 4x100watt kenwood tower speakers and 2 clarion 100watt in the boat .
A. With these running will I need to put in another battery or do I put in something else ie;
capacitator and if so what does it do and where do I put it.

B.Is the 600watt enough to power the tower and boat speakers or i it to much

C. Can I run the negative from my 600 watt straight to the earth on the 150 that I already have fitted .I'm taking the power wire all the way back to the battery.

Sorry for the long post but so many questions; and the people that u talk to at the audio shops speak a different language .
And lastly what does brigeable mean and can it help me
Cheers

 
By Bob (bob) on Tuesday, September 09, 2003 - 9:39 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
A. With these running will I need to put in another battery or do I put in something else ie;
capacitator and if so what does it do and where do I put it.
Are these RMS or PEAK watts, if RMS then 150+600=750 watts \ 13.8 volts = 54 amps draw at max load if you wire your speakers to your amps that way. Im running 600+400+450 right now and am using 1250 watts of that with a stock alternator (barely- i try to charge my batteries before i go out each time) and two batteries running in parralel = just like if you were jump starting another vehicle. I do have a 1 farad cap but its up in the air exactly how much these things do help, most people recommend just making sure your power wire is plenty big (im running 4 ga to the cap top and from there it split off to three short runs to each amp. 4 ga runs approx 15 feet to the cap from the battery then about 1-3 ft to each amp. If i take out the 600 rockford for the subs and add a 1000 watt rockford id probably need to go with 2 ga, just to give you an idea of what size wire.

C. Can I run the negative from my 600 watt straight to the earth on the 150 that I already have fitted .I'm taking the power wire all the way back to the battery.
NO you cant piggy-back the grounds unless the wire size for the 150 is large enough to carry the load of both amps, oh and the fuse needs to be large enough for both (DONT TRY TO JUST PUT A BIGGER FUSE ON THE SMALLER WIRE UNLESS YOU WANT TO TEST OUT THAT FIRE EXTINGUISHER)
Think of electricity like a big circle, power comes out one terminal of the battery and its trying to get back in the other terminal through your wire and amp and anything else (you leave one thing in the circuit too small and you will run into problems, only thing that should be small is the fuse so it goes before something detrimental happens).

B.Is the 600watt enough to power the tower and boat speakers or is it to much? Im running 200 watts to my 4 boat speakers and 450 watts to the tower.
I did it different though, one amp=subs, one amp=towers, one amp=boat speakers

 
By Rod McInnis (rodmcinnis) on Tuesday, September 09, 2003 - 11:33 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Martin:

Adding a second battery can do one of three possible things for you: It can double the time you can play your stereo with the engine off, or it can be a reserve so that you can always start your engine once you have run the primary battery down, or it can be a totally separate system so that no matter what you do with the stereo it won't run down the main battery.

Which of these scenarios you get depends on how you hook up the second battery.

The easiest installation is to simply add another battery and hook it up in parallel to the first battery, i.e., you connec the Positives together and then the Negatives get connected together. This gives you twice the battery, but doesn't offer any isolation or protection. If you run the stereo too long without the engine running, you will end up with two dead batteries.

A slight variation to this idea is to add a battery switch, and connect the positives of both batteries to the switch. This allows you to run off either battery or both at the same time. IF you remember to switch to just one battery, then the other battery will be held in reserve (assuming that it was charged up to start with). This works as long as you remember to operate the switch: On "BOTH" to charge, on "1" or "2" when the engine is not running. If you forget to operate the switch, you can end up with dead batteries. An improvement to this installation would be to add a "battery isolator" at the output of the alternator, which will allow it to automatically charge both batteries regardless of the switch setting. Then you just leave the switch always in one position and you are safe.

A third method is to have the stereo, or at least the amps, connect to the new battery and leave everything else on the original battery. Use the battery isolator (mentioned above) so that the alternator will charge both batteries.

Another option to the battery isolator is a "battery combiner". This is a device that monitors the voltage on each battery and if one is getting charged, it connects the two together so that the other can share the wealth. These are actually easier to install than an isolator and don't degrade the alternator output like the isolator does.

You should also note that just adding more battery is not the solution if your alternator is not big engough to start with. If your stereo is drawing 50 amps, and your basic boat operation is drawing another 10 amps (ignition, pumps, lights, blowers, etc.) then you had better have at least a 60 amp alternator or your battery can go dead while you are driving around.

As for what "bridgeable" means: Many amps allow you to connect the outputs together in such a way that it doubles the voltage output. Obviously, this requires two channels of the amp to drive a single speaker. This is commonly done with the subwoofer, which is usually a mono channel anyway.

The reason that you would want to do this is because you were driving a higher impedence speaker, like 8 ohms. The higher the impedence, the higher the voltage required in order to get a certain amount of power. Note that you are NOT doubling the power output of the amp, you are allowing the amp to drive the power it is cabable of.

If the speaker impedence is low, then you don't want to bridge the output. In fact, most amps won't be able to handle a bridged output if the impedence is less than 4 ohms.


 
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