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WakeWorld Discussion Board » >> Boats, Accessories & Tow Vehicles Archive » Archive through February 10, 2003 » Long distance towing « Previous Next »
By Lady Boarder (ladyboarder) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 5:43 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Hi guys, the farthest I have ever towed my boat is 4.5-5hrs, never even thought about going further than that. However, next summer I may very well be towing long distances, like 7-9hrs. I tow with my dad's 02 Avalanche with Z-71 package. What do I need to check on the truck and boat when I'm towing such long distances. I do tow with the tow/haul on, I know that much. I plan on taking the boat to a brake shop before I tow to have the wheels/hubs/brakes checked out. Anything I need to keep an eye on with the truck. It has a tendency to burn oil I think. I realize that some are going to say "get an F-250 Super Duty" or "get a Chevy 2500 HD." As much as I'd love to, I just bought a Ford Ranger and I love it, so a new vehicle is not an option.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Later
Tiffanator

 
By Mark Bellaver (markb) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 5:47 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Not sure if the Z-71 package comes with a transmission cooler, but if it doesn't that would be a really good investment. I think U-Haul installs them for like 100 bucks.

(Message edited by markb on December 06, 2002)

 
By Matt Legge (leggester) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 5:57 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Tiff,

Do a search, I think there was a really huge thread about this very thing.

Basically, all the normal stuff and when you make any stops, check the hubs for excessive heat. Also, check the trailer tire at the same time. Look at the tread! I made a stop on the way to Powell last year and saw that the right trailer tire was starting to delaminate. Glad I looked, it was easier to change the tire at the gas station than have a blow out on the highway.

 
By Mark Strittmatter (prostar205v) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 6:58 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
I just returned from a 2600 mile round trip to florida and back. I have just trader a Expedition w/4.6 to a Navigator w/5.4. Had no problems at all. I check the trailer hubs every gas station stop (which is often). I have a MC with the see through oil caps for the hubs which make it nice. We have a 2003 209 probably 4800# loaded. This past summer we took our old 205v down to Key West from Missouri (over 3200 miles round trip) with the Expedition. It labored because of the engine size but still no problems. That trailer had the hubs seals that would leak when the lube would get warm. I worried because of the leakage on that trailer. I agree with the others, good trailer brakes, lubed hubs, transmission and oil coolers. Good Luck!
 
By Tony Neal (aneal000) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 7:47 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Mark, we need to hook up. I live in Lake Saint Louis, I guess it has been two years ago we took our Malibu down to Destin, FL. Been seriously thinking about taking another trip, considering farther south. How long did it take you to get to the Keys? Was the water worth it? I can only imagine it was! We were thinking about making another trip this spring. Would love to hear about your experience.
Tony

 
By ChadB (wantboatnow) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 7:55 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
The truck will tow the boat no problem. They are rated to tow a lot more then you will be towing. Is the main part of your driving flat or is it grades? I've towed our old boat which was about 3500lbs to Lake Powell, about 12 hours, with a 4.8L and had no problems. A lot of the way was some good sized grades. With my 5.3, there is always plenty of power left to pass at 70+.
 
By trash (trash) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 8:13 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Hey Tiff, I have an Avalanche as well, and with my boat (probably close to 4500 lbs with gear) I have no problem towing. If it's a 2002, the transmission cooler is built in already. If you live in a real hilly area you might find the 327 a little weak, but out here in the flatlands of Canada there is definately no problem. My trailer is a double axle, so there is no sway on the highway when it's windy, and I check hubs before I leave and at every stop we make. Doesn't take much, just walk around to each wheel and grab the hub. Mine are always warm but never hot.

I tow 6 hours (3 hours each way) every weekend (which is going to stop this coming year as I can't afford the gas to do it anymore :-( )

Trash

(Message edited by trash on December 06, 2002)

 
By Mark Strittmatter (prostar205v) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 8:44 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Tony, We live in Columbia and take the boat to Orlando 2 times yearly. My brother lives there so it makes it nice to combine family and pleasure. We just returned from Orlando last week and made the trip back in 16 hours. Yes, needless to say we had the hammer down. Really it should be about a 18-19 hour trip from Columbia. From Orlando you are looking at another 400 miles or about 8 hours. Can't make good time once you hit the Keys. The highway is single lane for 100+ miles through towns and some Tikki bars for refreshments. We decided to take the 205v down because it handles rough water well. It was WELL worth the extra gas money. We rented a house off Duvall and I paid $20 day for covered storage. The city boat ramp cost $7.00 per day and has a fresh water flushing station (important). The water on the bay side is skiable. We didn't ski just took boat rides, snorkeling and swimming. We went to Sand Key about 7 miles from Key west 3 different days and tied up to the mooring buoys. Plenty of dolphins, turtles ect. The water clarity was unbelievable. Depth Finder would read 20-40 ft and you could still see the bottom. Needless to say we didn't want to leave. If you leave Sand Key you will enter the Atlantic where the water turns colbalt blue and you max out the depth finder. We were lucky the waves never were over 1-2 ft that trip. With the new 209 I don't think it will be able to make that trip again. The nose drops to close to the water. For what it is worth it was well worth the time. Besides, the money it took to get it down there still was less that what you would pay for a family of 4 to take a 4 hour dolphin excursion. This way we had 7 days anytime and wherever we wanted to wander. We have a group of 5 MasterCraft owners here in Columbia that make all the holiday trips down to Norfork lake maybe some time we can get hooked up.
 
By Sean M (magic) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 9:31 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
What Matt said. Check your trailer hubs, check your trailer hubs and oh ya, check your trailer hubs.

Check you tire presure. Even new, in good shape tires can blow. I have had a tire blow and smoked an axle all with one year. The axle was an issue with it no being assembled correctly, the tire is still a mystery to this day. Both occured on a 4 hour tow.

 
By Chris Neelley (hatepwcs) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 9:44 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Good rule of thumb is every 3 hours check the tires/hubs and the hitch/ball. One of the most common mistakes is over greasing your hubs and blowing out the seals. Grease thats streaking your wheels could be a sign that a seal is bad. It takes very little pressure to blow them out. Don't get carried away with the grease gun.
 
By Lady Boarder (ladyboarder) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 11:13 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Thanks for the suggestions everyone, I'll remember them when I start to travel. Chris, my dad said that you fill the hubs until grease comes out, is that wrong? I filled them about two shoots of grease each, then he went back and topped them off. How much grease should go in them.
Thanks
Tiffanator

 
By Tony Neal (aneal000) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 2:02 pm:    Edit Post Delete Post
Mark, that sounds awsome. Thanks for the info. We do Norfork quite a bit during the summer. We usually stay at the Norfork Inn in Henderson. That is really the nicest lake around here. Let me know when you guys are going, maybe we can meet up with all of you (even though I am a Malibu owner :-)
 
By Mark Strittmatter (prostar205v) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 2:18 pm:    Edit Post Delete Post
Tony, We stay at the 101 resort. We will definately be there Memorial, 4th and labor day. The other guys have a course they set up in 1 of the coves. We have several of the groups kids that would love to see some wakeboading that you show in your profile. Unlike alot of the people that bash boats on this board, we could care less whether you have a MC, Nautique, Malibu ect. The fact that you have a boat and ride is good enough for us! These companies have been in business for along time so they must be doing something right.
 
By Mark Strittmatter (prostar205v) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 4:08 pm:    Edit Post Delete Post
Tony, We stay at the 101 resort. We will definately be there Memorial, 4th and labor day. The other guys have a course they set up in 1 of the coves. We have several of the groups kids that would love to see some wakeboading that you show in your profile. Unlike alot of the people that bash boats on this board, we could care less whether you have a MC, Nautique, Malibu ect. The fact that you have a boat and ride is good enough for us! These companies have been in business for along time so they must be doing something right.
 
By Lee Tudor (leetudor) on Friday, December 06, 2002 - 7:16 pm:    Edit Post Delete Post
For trailer hubs you want just enough lube to expand the spring. That will give room for the lube to expand when the lube heats up. If hub is filled completely the seals will blow out when the lube gets hot.
 
By Bob (bob) on Monday, December 09, 2002 - 10:14 pm:    Edit Post Delete Post
overfiling will force the lip of the "double-lip" seal to pop out and then it wont be sealing the water out and keeping the greese in, oh yea the hubs with the brakes will be hotter then the hubs without and if your running disk brakes they will be warmer then drum but not smoking hot(remember when your checking them you just slowed down from 65/70 so the hubs will be a bit warmer from the braking), key is to compare the two and they should be about the same temp
 
By Chris Foye (wakejunky) on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 - 5:20 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Also, invest the $$$ into a spare tire and mount for the trailer. If you do blow a tire, at least won't be stranded.

Chris
get the grip you deserve
www.wakejunky.com/gatorgrip

http://home.surewest.net/cfoye/96sportnautique/96sportnautique.htm


 
By salty87 (salty87) on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 - 8:25 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
how hard are the seals to replace? i have one of the 4 that always leaks grease on the wheel. it is opposite a tire that went flat last year.
 
By Allt (allterr1) on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 - 8:32 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Salty.....

Probably easier to just replace the whole hub. You can get them for between $30 - $40.

 
By Chris Neelley (hatepwcs) on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 - 11:11 am:    Edit Post Delete Post
Tiffany-
Sorry for the late response. What Lee mentions is my protocol as well. Make your dad pay for the seals!!!! If you make the trip before replacing, keep a close eye on em and grease gun handy.

 
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